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  2. Just watched this on Netflix - Guy Martin: Last Flight of the Vulcan. Pure aircraft porn. Can't recommend it highly enough. (I have just had a couple of reds, so my judgement may be slightly clouded. Damn good watch though.)
  3. No worries, I'm one of those weekend flyers.
  4. I can appreciate your position - many of us began our careers that way. Firstly, you need to 'get the horse before the cart' as the old saying goes. While buying your own aircraft sounds 'logical' - given that you are only perceiving the advantages it offers you for future training - don't do it. You should firstly consider just what type of flying you'll need to help attain your RPL>PPL>CPL. Only 100 hrs of RAAus flying is allowable when looking at the 200hr CPL. So, RAAus isn't going to be the answer. And, you would require an aircraft with full panel instrumentation to do your RPL and PPL IF experience. For CPL, you'll need an aircraft with accepted navaids, at least up to NVFR level, and capable of 120KIAS and with CSU. That means you need an aircraft worth over $100,000 by my calcs - not worth it. In any case, as an owner of 11 consecutive aircraft since 1977, I can tell you that they cost far more to operate than the salesman will tell you. Unless you fly an aircraft 300 hrs pa, the overheads/annual charges are going to bury you. In order to learn your flying in aircraft of increasing complexity, you'll need to hire them. There are many ways to achieve good deals, including negotiating with a flying school, or joining an aero club with well equipped aircraft, or finding an owner who is prepared to hire to you for specific blocks of flight. eg, to increase the cross-country hours you need for CPL, you might negotiate the dry hire of an aircraft and take 2-3 passengers with you for a good long inland or northern winter flight. With a hired aircraft - you can have certainty of cost. Cost sharing is a legal and perfectly acceptable way to split the costs of any aircraft flight and this is easily verified when you use a hired aircraft. If you do 20-30 hrs of cross-country flying, yet only pay 1/3rd the total cost - your budget stretches so much further for the other required dual training. Another solution which may/may not work for you is to join in a group ownership scheme. There are quite a few around. Here, you buy a share, which might cost you anywhere from $3000 up to $20,000 - depending on owner numbers and, the value of the aircraft. Then, you fly that aircraft privately whenever you can - the more you fly, the lower becomes the 'overhead' component of each hours flying. Group aircraft are usually insured for training, and so are usable for your higher licence training - but remember that flying schools tend to scale up the instructor rates on outside aircraft. I became a member of the earliest Brisbane flying group in 1964, and did 100s hours in their Victa and C172 - leading on to my CPL. It worked well for me because I easily onsold my share of $500, (what's that worth now?). I was also very active in trying to meet each and every aircraft owner on Archerfield. I picked up a few 'ferry' flights that way, and also got to fly a Maule M5-210 for the local agent. You don't have to brown-nose to achieve this - a bit of talk, perhaps some help with the aircraft or in the hangar? It goes a long way to proving your character. Owners judge more on character than on what hrs you might have in your logbook. That's life. Good luck in your flying, happy days,
  5. rankamateur

    Free Flight Melb - Syd Jetstar

    Do you have to be named Ian Baker, with photo ID?
  6. Mike Borgelt

    What happened with the MTOW change for RAAus

    FAA policy is that aircraft certified at higher than 600kg gross cannot be LSA at 600 kg. Which leads to things like certain model Ercoupes being able to go to LSA and the same ones that were later allowed to go to higher weights and have the paper work to allow it cannot. Particularly unfortunate in the case of the Bolkow 208C which has a gross of 601 kg. Nice little aircraft and somebody needs to make it as a kit or provide plans as a homebuilt. Besides it can bare its fangs as a Biafran Baby (look it up). Note those rockets come in laser guided versions now. Paint it up as a low cost warbird.
  7. Today
  8. Kyle Communications

    Is a Lycoming 320 the way to go?

    100hp isnt enough?..why not a Rotax
  9. Won't be able to dispatch till Tuesday though...only ordered 10 today to get the cheap price so they should arrive on Monday or Tuesday
  10. Been thinking about this for a while but just bought mine. Thanks Ian/clear prop.
  11. Pilot Pete

    Thruster T84A rare single seater

    What was the registration number?
  12. poteroo

    another servey by RAAUS

    I'm reminded of a couple common sayings: Ask no questions and you will be told no lies............. (unknown,18th century) Never ask a question unless you know the answer....... (unknown, but very applicable to Canberra) happy days,
  13. Stupid me, I booked a flight from Melb to Sydney on the 4th June and whilst I was sure I picked AM it has come through as PM which is of no use to me. The flight departs Melb at 6.45pm so does any one want it...it's free or any donation is gratefully accepted
  14. Downunder

    Is a Lycoming 320 the way to go?

    Lots of lightweight parts for Lycoming's around these days. I think you could build one quite light. Rotec specs 100 kg dry for the 2800 so it wasn't too much of a lightweight. http://www.heavy-fuel-engines.com/lycoming-solutions/ http://www.continentalmotors.aero/titan/experimental-kit-engines.aspx X320.... 121 kg X340... 117 to 134 kg Electronic ignitions and fuel injection from SDS for example. http://www.sdsefi.com/lycoming.htm You could also run unleaded (if inclined ) with right configuration...
  15. Marty_d

    Engine mount - build or buy?

    Thanks for that. According to the bed mount plans the front tubes are open (guess I could always weld caps on the ends).
  16. Downunder

    Engine mount - build or buy?

    Weld up your mount fully sealed. Fit a schrader valve and small pressure gauge. Put a little bit of air pressure in your mount. (A few psi) If your mount cracks you will lose air pressure.
  17. Marty_d

    Engine mount - build or buy?

    Think I've actually got enough 4130 to do the job. So yes I could cut it and prep for welding.
  18. Marty_d

    Engine mount - build or buy?

    Er... no? Please explain!
  19. FlyingVizsla

    another servey by RAAUS

    Did mine, but have to wait till we get home to Mr FV's iPad for him to do his, as my computer says "You have already completed this survey", I guess that's to stop people doing hundreds of responses on the one computer. One question was intended as a multi choice, but would only allow one response - so I put them in Other. I'll keep an eye out for the results.
  20. nomadpete

    another servey by RAAUS

    This survey is a great opportunity for everyone to tell RAAus in no uncertain terms, what we think about all the stuff I see posters here complaining about:- The push for CTA (access or transit only, and under what proviso) The push for 1500kg MTOW (or other weight, and under what conditions) The lack of feedback after a survey The lack of information to confirm what policy or rule changes are (or are not) happening. Etc....... Don't complain about the survey. Just do it.
  21. Downunder

    Engine mount - build or buy?

    I'm told ring mounts are better. I know one aircraft with a ring mount and the lack of vibration and smoothness are obvious. I don't know whether it just his setup/engine but he recons it's the mount. I can tell it's him taxiing past my hanger over any other rotax. Just so quiet and smooth. Could you purchase the cut tube, and then weld here? Might save on postage. You know the schrader valve and gauge trick? I have a bed mount but also an arm over the top from firewall to gbox....
  22. Yeah, I'd rather buy it from Clear Prop anyway, thanks Ian!
  23. Surely downgrading a mtow and flying within that downgraded weight makes the aircraft safer?
  24. peter

    Compass position

    The yellow one is the original and still works perfectly but I wanted to go hi tech with a colour screen hence the new one. The new one also has built in magnetic compass, cheers Peter
  25. Hey folks, I'm getting to the pointy end of the 701 build and starting to pore over the plans for the 912/912s engine mount. The one in the plans is the bed-style mount as shown below: I seem to remember that to buy a firewall-forward kit was somewhere north of $4,000. Not including engine, obviously. Zenair site quotes the bed mount by itself as US $750, so with freight and currency conversion that could be over $1500. Before I start planning in SketchUp, building a jig and contacting my long-suffering metal worker to tell him there's more 4130 welding on the way... is there a better option? Are these mounts "standard" or easily modified from other aircraft (and is it common that they're sold second hand?) What are the advantages of the newer "ring" style mount over the "bed" style? If building, are there traps to look out for? Is it a different level of welding? All helpful comments appreciated. Thanks! Marty
  26. I am wondering if the down grading of MTOW from that certified is a ICAO requirement. When NZ lifted the Ultralight MTOW to 600kg from 544kg a few years back I contacted the NZCAA about allowing a Jodel D11 into the Ultralight category and was told that as the D11 was certified to a higher weight (620?kg)That it could not be moved into the ultralight category and would have to remain experimental. Maybe CASA are now enforcing this and we will no longer see aircraft that are certified for a MTOW above 600kg being registered with RAAus.
  27. spacesailor

    Compass position

    Hi Peter. Which model of etrex is yours. A quick check of ebay shows different models. spacesailor
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