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  1. turboplanner

    RAAus to disclose member details

    Last I heard it went into general revenue, and we certainly are reamed out on fuel in Australia, but this thread is about airfield operators charging landing fees, using radio to identify the aircraft landing, which then identifies the owner's name and address if the aircraft is registered VH, and in this thread specifically the decision of RAA to release the names and addresses of owners of RA registered aircraft, so what we pay in fuel taxes is not related to what we pay an individual organisation for using their airfield.
  2. Who knows. I just had a look at the Sydney VTC and some of the notes for Bankstown and Victor 1 and around Sydney. Not a single mention of any routes or requirements for singles compared to twins or any other type of or numbers of engines. Sure there's vfr routes in and out but they are for everyone regardless of engine numbers and for conflict prevention not to stop specifically singles. Same for the dedicated Choppers North and West - no freedom to go anywhere else just cos you got more than one donk. Oh and the other thing was he was over water at the time of the tail rotor failure. In the subsequent loss of control he travelled forward over land then made a left turn and travelled about the same distance again further over land. So the concept that this accident showed or was the instigator of travelling over creeks and waterfronts as somehow a safety thing doesn't make sense.
  3. Blinky Bill

    RAAus to disclose member details

    Just for interest,where does all the GST,Fuel Levies and Fuel Excise on Avgas get spent.I submit that we pay our way.
  4. onetrack

    Antoinette V16

    Yes there is! - A very powerful aircraft, of course! What else? 😆 Antoinette V16 aircraft
  5. From Helicopter Crashes in City | Dictionary of Sydney HOME.DICTIONARYOFSYDNEY.ORG This week on 2SER Breakfast, Dictionary special guest Dr Peter Hobbins talked to Tess about a terrible accident in the centre of the city in 1966 when a helicopter crashed onto Gold Fields House at… Maybe this is the source of the regulation idea? "While the investigation into the accident had consequences for the helicopter’s American manufacturers Bell, who faced litigation that went on into the 1970s, another long term outcome was that single-engined aircraft, like small planes and helicopters, could no longer fly over built up areas like the city, which is why today you see them flying along Sydney’s waterways like the harbour or rivers. "
  6. The machine leaves more questions unanswered than it answers. Q 1. How are the authorities going to treat this machine? It's an aircraft, so where are the rules and regulations for the operation of this thing? Q 2. At a maximum height of 16 feet, it's not going to clear a lot of powerlines and other aerial wiring in populated areas. In fact, it will be in direct conflict with them. So it would have to be operated at around head height or even less. That makes it exceptionally dangerous for people on the ground. Q 3. I can see some potential for the rig to be used in emergency work in marshy ground, exploration in remote areas, and in farming operations, in open paddocks/fields. But if the countryside needing to be accessed has trees more than 16 feet high, what then? Duck between the trees, and duck the passing swishing branches? I think the applications for the machine are going to be extremely limited, and the controls of its operation, very tight. Meantimes, back at the Ranch - how are the Dubai Police getting on, with their hoverbikes?? New Atlas - Dubai Police hoverbikes Can you imagine what a bank-robbing crim could do with a high-powered weapon - or even a shotgun, to one of these things?? Talk about a suicide mission. I guess the next American version will have it sorted - a .50 cal Browning MG mounted in front of the operator, will be their answer. 😓
  7. Blinky Bill

    RAAus to disclose member details

    The Board are not interested in listening to the Members views and when challenged tell a convenient truth. Member access to RA Aus Member Services, has now been restricted to Monday, |Wednesday & Friday (3 days a week), down from 4.5 days a week,who was consulted? Members need to raise a vote of no confidence in the CEO. Other staff who are followers of the CEO, including the people manager ie the smooth talker that tells us the convenient truth, must provide a higher level of Member Service.
  8. Colin Furze (in my top 5 Of youtubers) built one in his shed some time ago so there should be good factory sorted machines available now.
  9. I think the term CHOPPER will apply here, the chopped meat being the pilot or his mates on the ground.
  10. red750

    Any Site Problems...Site Support

    Seems to have resolved itself.
  11. red750

    Any Site Problems...Site Support

    Clicked my default, What's New (All) and got this- [[Template core/front/streams/streamItems is throwing an error. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]] Doesn't happen with What's New (Unread).
  12. Received by email. Qantas expects to cut its fuel bill by as much as $40 million a year thanks to a radical overhaul to how it plots its flights across the globe. The airline has spent five years and millions of dollars building a new flight planning program – until now kept tightly under wraps – which it says will materially cut its fuel bill and bring its ultra-long haul ambitions closer to reality. Qantas’ team of dispatchers have used the same computer program for 30 years to plan the route of each flight, assessing weather, airspace traffic, safety, and legal constraints on three or four possible routes. The new system uses cloud computing to crunch data on thousands of possible flight paths, using millions of data points – including the latest wind patterns, and varying altitudes and flight speeds – to build a ‘‘cost map’’ that presents the most efficient route. Built in collaboration with the University of Sydney’s Australian Centre for Field Robotics, the Constellation system has been rolled out to Qantas’ A380s, 747s and Boeing Dreamliners since the start of October, and will be installed on the remainder of its fleet next year. Allen Dickinson, Qantas’ head of flight operations systems, said the entirely digital system (dispatchers on the old system churn through a full ream of paper every day) had already delivered impressive results. On recent flight from Sydney to Santiago, the system diverted a Qantas Boeing 747 slightly south to take advantage of a tail-wind which saved Qantas one tonne of fuel. ‘‘It’s just a subtle shift here to pick up a bit of wind. And that’s the beauty of this system – just being able to find those subtle changes where we couldn’t do that in the old system,’’ said Captain Dickinson, who is an A330 pilot. In some instances, the system has plotted unusual flight paths that may never have occurred to a human dispatcher. A flight to Johannesburg, for example, was directed to fly 160 nautical miles (300 kilometres) further than it would normally, but in doing so cut the headwinds it experienced by two-thirds. The 747 arrived only three minutes later than scheduled and saved more than a tonne of fuel. The new system’s introduction comes as Qantas assesses the viability of launching ultra-long, non-stop flights from Melbourne and Sydney to London and New York. In these cases, fuel burn would be a key consideration. The University of Sydney’s Salah Sukkarieh, a professor of robotics and intelligent systems who worked on the project, said the Constellation was the most advanced being used by any airline in the world. “The older system was almost like planning in your car – you just go left and right, basically,’’ Professor Sukkarieh said. The new system, which builds on work the centre had done with unmanned drones, ‘‘added wings to your vehicle and it lets you fly in that dimensional space and go to different altitudes in real time’’. In the project’s business case, it said Constellation would cut Qantas’ annual fuel bill by about 0.6 per cent. The airline now believes it will be closer to 1 per cent. That would translate to $40 million saving, based on this year’s expected fuel bill of $4 billion. Other airlines were already interested in buying the system from Qantas. Qantas would not reveal how much the new system cost to build, but says it expects it to pay for itself within a few years. Key points New computer system will save on fuel costs for airline. The new system will be fitted on all Qantas planes next year.
  13. If a flying car doesn't really appeal to you, how about a flying bike? A California company is apparently on the verge of making this dream a reality. However, much like the flying cars of today, this product too will not come cheap. The company, Hoversurf, claims to have developed their own engines and computerized flight systems to make their ‘aerial motorbike’ effective, safe and manoeuvrable in the air. All this translates into an asking price of $150,000. For this, you get an impressive, drone-like machine capable of propelling you into the air at something like automobile speeds. What is the Flying Motorbike and Where Does It Come From? This new type of vehicle is called the Hoverbike eVTOL S3 2019. Its makers, Hoversurf, say that the product is ready for sale. eVTOL refers to the battery technology found in the product, a form of the lithium-nickel-manganese block that powers the Hoverbike’s four large propellers. Indeed, the vehicle does closely resemble a drone and is even referred to as one in the company’s product-information material. However, this drone is capable of lifting a human (who weighs about 250 pounds or less) up to 16 feet off the ground. This human can sit on the Hoverbike, and control it via front-mounted stalks, much like a regular motorbike. A shot of the Hoverbike in flight. (Source: Howversurf) Hoversurf claims that their new “personal drone” can fly at up to 60 miles per hour. However, as with many other pro-sumer drones, it can only do so for about 25 minutes at a time. The company asserts, however, that the onboard computer is equipped with the flight-modeling and fail-safes necessary to control the risks of collisions or fatal cut-outs in the air. This modeling is also intended to address other dangers, including wind speed and turbulence while flying. So, Who Gets to Fly a Hoverbike? As with Terrafugia’s latest 'flying car,' the Hoverbike does not require that the user have a pilot’s license or other specialist training. Hoversurf commented on this saying that it has been categorized as an ‘ultralight aircraft’ by the FAA, thus rendering its use unrestricted and without the need for certification (in the United States, at least). However, a potential customer may need the financial flexibility needed to rationalize spending over $100,000 on what is essentially a giant bike-sized drone. These enthusiasts could also be advised to wear a helmet while riding their new flying bikes. Speaking of flying vehicles, the Hoverbike is not the only product its manufacturer has in mind. Hoversurf also seems to be working on developing flying taxis too. This new type of drone is also powered by eVTOL technology and is portrayed as having an enclosed cabin. The “electric flying car” may be propelled by Hoversurf’s new type of engine, the Venturi. The company claims that this is a hybrid between the engines of an aircraft and helicopter but gains additional jet-stream by sucking ordinary air into it, which, in turn, increases efficiency and reduces noise. New Type of Taxi, New Type of Engine The Venturi’s moving parts are all contained within a carbon-fiber shell, which is intended to boost safety and also reduce the engine’s volume. The company has also apparently secured a patent for the Venturi engine. These may be incorporated into the ‘drone taxi’ (also known as Project Formula) to give it vertical take-off and landing. This vehicle is also described as containing sensors for a 3D perspective of its surroundings and object recognition, which may be controlled by an AI for safe and effective flight. It is also to be equipped with an airbag, a ballistic parachute and landing gear in cases of difficult landings or adversity during flight. In addition, from the implication of the title 'drone taxi' and the fact that the scope for only one passenger is mentioned, it appears that this vehicle is also to be driverless. In that case, it is to be hoped that it comes equipped with mapping, traffic control and aerial co-ordination systems like those proposed by a team at MIT for such flying vehicles. Hoversurf does not mention plans to market or sell this particular product (i.e., the taxi), any time soon. However, it is yet another exciting hint of a future with real, personal flying machines!
  14. Airservices Australia today announced it has reached two major milestones in OneSKY, the world-leading program being undertaken jointly with the Department of Defence. Air Traffic Management (ATM) service facilities in Sydney, Melbourne and Perth have switched over to the Civil Military ATM (CMATS) voice communication system. Brisbane’s air traffic service centre will follow suit in early 2019. Voice communications are a cornerstone of any ATM system, allowing air traffic controllers and pilots to talk to each other. “The new CMATS voice communications system enables greater efficiency of our air traffic resources, enhances safety outcomes and minimises service disruptions,” according to Airservices Chief Executive Officer Jason Harfield. “These benefits will be experienced by all users of Australian airspace, from the major airlines and their passengers right through to the smallest ultralight aircraft.” The Airservices and Defence project team worked with operational staff and industry partners, Thales Australia and Frequentis, to ensure a seamless transition to the CMATS voice communication system in the first three locations. “Achieving this milestone on schedule and with no disruption to existing services is an exceptional demonstration of how civil and military air traffic operations will work together,” Mr Harfield said. Airservices and Thales have also just completed the system definition review for CMATS, the technical platform that will unite Australia’s civil and military air traffic control systems. The project now moves into the detailed design phase. “We are proud to deliver these key milestones in the OneSKY program just nine months after signing contracts with our military and industry partners,” said Mr Harfield. About OneSKY OneSKY is a world-leading program to align the needs of civil and military aviation, while catering for the forecast growth in the aviation sector. Over the coming years, advanced air traffic management technology will be introduced in stages to unlock more than a billion dollars of economic benefits for Australia.
  15. spacesailor

    icom airband handheld

    Is this the 25/8.33mhz, model, or the earlier 25mhz only. thanks Bryan
  16. old man emu

    Interesting cloud formations

    Hope his airways clearance was in order.
  17. I tried to become an Autogyro driver when they were in Easterncreek Sydney. But was frightened off with a $400 an hour training cost. Was told year's later it was a none funny joke, a particular man person tells. still don't get that joke !. Even have the business card from the Schofields flying club. That long ago. spacesailor
  18. spacesailor

    BLOG AWAY

    NUDITY. It's great I do it Every time I shower. Alway's wash your socks separately !. Every-one I know was born NUDE. Prove me wrong on that one. Don't wear a hat just because of "alopecia" spacesailor
  19. pmccarthy

    Antoinette V16

    Antoinette began as a private venture led by the engineer Léon Levavasseur. By 1904, most of the prize-winning speedboats in Europe were powered with Antoinette engines. During this time, he designed engines of various configurations of up to thirty-two cylinders. The company's primary business was the sale of engines to aircraft builders. Their engines were used in the Santos-Dumont 14-bis of 1906, Paul Cornu's rudimentary helicopter of 1907, the Voisin biplane that was modified and piloted by Henri Farman who used it to complete Europe's first 1 kilometer circular flight in January 1908, and other significant pioneer aircraft. There seems to be no information about the application of the v16.
  20. Owning and flying your own small airplane offers a nearly unmatched level of freedom and autonomy. Traveling “as the crow flies” without having to deal with traffic on the ground immediately shrinks your world, and makes possible all sorts of trips and adventures. Unfortunately the crippling downsides of plane ownership (storage and maintenance costs, knowledge that you might die in a fiery crash, etc), keeps most of us planted squarely on terra firma. But not [ITman496]. His dream of owning an ultralight has recently come true, and he’s decided to share his experience with the world. He’s got a long way to go before he slips the surly bonds of Earth, but there’s no better place to start than the beginning. In a recent blog post he documents the process of getting his new toy home, and details some of the work he plans on doing to get it airworthy. The plane in question is a Mini-MAX that [ITman496] has determined is not only older than he is, but has never flown. It was built by a retired aircraft mechanic who unfortunately had problems with his heart towards the end of assembly. He wisely decided that he should find a safer way to spend his free time than performing solo flights in an experimental aircraft, so he put the plane up for sale. After a considerable adventure transporting the plane back home, [ITman496] found it was stored in such good condition that the engine started right up. But that doesn’t mean it’s ready for takeoff by any stretch of the imagination. For his own safety, he’s planning on tearing down the entire plane to make sure everything is in good shape and assembled correctly; so at least he’ll only have himself to blame if anything happens when he’s in the air. One the plane’s structure is sound, he’ll move on to some much needed engine modifications including a way to adjust the air-fuel mixture from inside the cockpit, improvements to the cooling system, and installation of a exhaust system that’s actually intended for the two-stroke engine he has. When that’s done, [ITman496] is going to move onto the real fun stuff: creating his own “glass cockpit”. For Hackaday readers who don’t spend their time playing make believe in flight simulators, a “glass cockpit” is a general term for using digital displays rather than analog gauges in a vehicle. [ITman496] has already bought two daylight-readable 10.1″ IPS displays which he plans on driving over HDMI with the Raspberry Pi. No word on what his software setup and sensor array will look like, but we’re eager to hear more as the project progresses. If you’re not lucky enough to find a mostly-complete kit plane nearby on Craigslist, you could always just make your own airplane out of sheets of foam.
  21. Photo: Courtesy Pal-V While we devote much ink (both actual and virtual) in our aviation coverage to first-class cabins, business jets, and charter services, planes are by no means the only ways to experience the thrill of flight. In fact, people were enjoying soaring through the air even before the invention of the airplane in a contraption that will actually make an appearance later on this list. The point is, there are plenty of fun ways to get an elevated perspective on things, from functional jetpacks to autogyros. Hoversurf Hoverbike parked Photo: courtesy of Hoversurf Hoverbike The Hoversurf Hoverbike is technically a vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) vehicle. However, while most of the full-size VTOLs that hope to come to market will have to contend with strict FAA regulations (many of which still have to be debated and implemented), the Hoverbike was able to receive classification as an ultralight aircraft, which means that riders don’t need to get a pilot’s license or certification (though Hoversurf requires that the owner takes a mandatory training course). The fully-electric aircraft is ridden like a motorcycle, with four propellers at each corner to provide lift and thrust. Its carbon fiber body saves weight, which means Hoversurf was able to install larger batteries that can keep the personal drone aloft for 10 to 25 minutes (depending on rider weight and other factors). When pressed to its limit, the Hoverbike can fly up to a restricted 60 mph. The company is taking orders now for the $150,000 machine, which will be delivered in two to six months. The mandatory training package costs another $10,000. FlyDoo light sport balloon in flight Photo: courtesy of SkyDoo Hot Air Balloon The oldest form of air transportation on this list, unmoored ballooning has been around for more than 200 years (fun fact: The world’s first balloon passengers were a sheep, a duck, and a rooster). Although many people think of ballooning as fodder for cheesy romantic dates or remember it for its Mandela Effect–like non-role in Jules Verne’s Around the World in 80 Days, there are still enthusiasts out there who turn what is a once-in-a-lifetime experience for most people into a serious hobby. And why not? While most of the vehicles on this list are meant to stir up your adrenaline, ballooning is about relaxation and killer views. One exciting new development in the field is the two-person FlyDoo, which could become the first hot-air balloon in the light sport category if the FAA approves the design. This development would make ballooning much more accessible to those with a casual interest. A complete FlyDoo is priced at around $21,000, but for an extra $14,000, you can add a vectored thrust unit (aka a motorized propeller) to help you direct your course. Apollo Flight Labs JetPack Photo: Courtesy Apollo Flight Labs Jetpack In most people’s minds, jetpacks are the stuff of science fiction and action movies. However, while no practical working model has been produced at scale, there are a few designs out there that you can actually get your hands on. Recently, Gravity Industries put a number of their Jet Suits on sale at Selfridge’s for $373,310. The suit employs a main thruster that attaches to the pilot’s back and two thrusters on each arm to control direction (yes, just like Iron Man). You may also want to comb the back alleys of eBay to get your jetpack fix. In September, Apollo Flight Labs put one of their used jetpacks up for auction to clear out some space in their shop. The Calidus AutoGyro has been flying in Europe since 2009 Photo: Courtesy Calidus Autogyro The technology behind autogyros is not new; It was developed nearly a century ago by Spanish engineer Juan de la Cierva with the goal of creating an aircraft that could fly safely at low speed. Classified along with helicopters as rotocraft, an autogyro is different because instead of a motor driving the rotor blades, it has a free-spinning rotor that provides lift simply by the aircraft moving forward—thrust that is usually provided by a motorized propeller at the rear. Thankfully, autogyros are much easier to pilot than helicopters and revised FAA regulations have made it easier for models to get certified. The Calidus Autogyro, one of the most popular designs in Europe—where autogyros are a more common sight—was recently certified in the U.S. and can now be purchased for around $100,000 from its U.S. distributor, AutoGyro USA. If you’re in no rush, you can also check out the Pal-V, an autogyro design that’s in development, with certification planned for 2020 (though this date has moved back a few times in the past). This unique vehicle is not only an autogyro; when it lands, its rotors and tail fold away, transforming it into a road-going three-wheeler. The Pal-V Liberty version is priced at $600,000, while the PAL-V Liberty Sport costs $400,000. DJI Goggles give you an immersive view from your drone. Photo: courtesy DJI Drone with VR headset The consumer drone revolution has made the buzzing little aircraft the easiest way to begin a lifelong obsession with flight. But controlling a drone from the ground while watching its camera feed through your phone isn’t quite the same experience as being up in the air yourself. That’s were another revolutionary technology that’s picking up steam comes in. Many drones now support VR headsets that give pilots a completely immersive first-person view. Alternately, you could let a friend wear it while you pull off your most daring aerial maneuvers and try to make them sick. Market leader DJI offers a pair of $350 VR goggles that work with its popular Mavic, Spark, Phantom, and Inspire series. This pair also features headtracking mode, in which the viewer can control the pitch of the camera and yaw of the drone with just their head movements, letting you take in the scene as if you were a passenger in the drone itself.
  22. Rising interest in sports involving aircrafts including aerial acrobatics, and airplane racing has greatly put the focus on the usage of ultralight models of aircraft around the world. Moreover, the increasing application of ultralight aircraft in public and defense operations such as reconnaissance flights, search and rescue operations and more. Rising importance on aircraft operation and production regulations along with technological innovations by manufacturers is anticipated to boost the demand in the ultralight aircraft market in the years to come. Relaxation in Regulations to Boost Production of Ultralight Aircrafts Rising amounts of investments are being put towards the use of ultralight aircraft for sports and recreational activities for learner pilots, especially for travelling short-distances. With manufacturers giving increased importance to enhanced performances and flight speed for new ultralight aircraft designs, the demand for these aircraft is bound to increase in the near future. One more vital aspect that must be considered, is the recent increase in the number of short-term aviation courses, which allow new pilots to gain the requisite skills and authorized certificates that are required to fly ultralight aircraft, as a result boosting the demand for ultralight aircraft. Relatively lower costs for purchasing, maintaining, and using ultralight aircraft is a key contributor behind the rising sales of ultralight aircraft. Moreover, the capability to take off and land in very small airstrip will also boost demand. Recently the usage of ultralight aircraft within the United States has been freed from regulations. This move by the government authorities in the country is expected to attract more end users and generate enhanced opportunity for the growth of manufacturers. The fact that there are no fixed standards developing ultralight aircraft along with the recent losses in the market value of the aviation sector, coupled with concerns about the safety of ultralight aircraft on the other hand are expected to significantly constrain the progress of ultralight producers. Technology and Material Improvements Gain High Importance Major producers of ultralight aircraft such as Evektor Spol. S.R.O, Quicksilver Aircrafts, P&M Aviation, and Cirrus Design Corporation, are giving great importance to aspects such as improving material, design, and technological improvements to gain benefits over the competition. For instance, the EuroStar SL+ range of ultralight aircraft by Evektor Spol S.R.O. is designed with ergonomically shaped interiors that include modifiable pedals, intelligent ventilation control, high seat backrest, and the use of corrosion resistant body material that allows to significantly lessen aircraft weight, to enhance load capacity for fuel, cargo, and crew. The design also enables pilots to recover easily incase the aircraft goes into the spin, thereby ensuring improved safety standards. Similarly, the the Sport 2SE special light sports aircraft ultralight by Quicksilver Aircraft is designed to comply to regulations for FAA approved and it provides pilots with an open cockpit design, that allows unfiltered views and maneuverability, at low costs. Widespread Presence of Market Players to Play Vital Role The rapid growth of the tourism sector in the emerging countries including Brazil, China, and India, are expected to generate lucrative opportunities for ultralight aircraft manufacturers who are operating internationally. Moreover, Vietnam is also gaining importance in the international scene as a key hub for the production of such aircraft. It is important to note that the ultralight aircraft are gaining in usage, in the United States of America owing to the deregulation these aircraft types, thereby enabling ultralight aircraft producers to put efforts towards innovative aircraft designs and materials.
  23. danny_galaga

    BLOG AWAY

    Excellent! There are things in my build that I may need to add to say the first post, months later so that will work well. I’ll transfer what I’ve written up to a blog and fix up typos and chronology etc while I’m at it 🙂
  24. Admin

    BLOG AWAY

    Yes you can...they are your blogs and there is generally no moderation except for anything that is negative towards the site (nudity, foul language, legal etc) but then you can also set your own permissions like making the blog only accessible to invited users etc
  25. turboplanner

    Alternate organisation...deafening silence

    It's an annual agreement; the deeds are updated each year and there should be a few on this site that you could search for.
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