Jump to content
  • Welcome to Recreational Flying!
    A compelling community experience for all aviators
    Intuitive, Social, Engaging...Registration is FREE.
    Register Log in
Sign in to follow this  
rmccoy8

GR912 tyre pressures

Recommended Posts

Hi I've been putting 20psi in the mains and 30psi in the tailwheel for some time now. Recently I had a puncture in the tailwheel and wonder if over inflation could have contributed to it. I would be interested in what other lightwing taildragger owners have to say.

 

Thanks Dick

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dick, Not sure what the pressures are for the standard mains (probabily 25-30 psi) as I run 6x6.00 aircraft grade tires. I generally maintain about 25 Psi in them as you run more it may want to bounce on touch down. Much lower and you run the risk of the tire rotating on the rim and severing your tube valve-stem.

 

Any taildragger tail wheel leads a hard life, and it's exciting if you have a failure, which should be avoided at all cost. I tend to keep both tube and tire near new, probabily replacing them after about 300 hours flying, or sooner if warranted. I always carry a spare tailwheel-tire and tube with me, which is not a lot of weight, and lives unobtrusivly under the Lightwing seat. I have had to use it a couple of times. When you buy tubes try and get the 'heavier duty' one's they are a bit thicker and a bit more puncture proof.

 

I tend to run 25-30 in my tailwheel also. And yes I have had punctures on rural properties, but don't think it is because of the high pressure. You've just got to expect one now and then, and be ready for it.

 

As a comparision, having a nose tire go flat on a training -wheel equipped aircraft can be just as inconvienent, and in the worse-case scenero can also involve prop damage requiring an engine strip-down....................................................................................................................................Maj...

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dick, Not sure what the pressures are for the standard mains (probabily 25-30 psi) as I run 6x6.00 aircraft grade tires. I generally maintain about 25 Psi in them as you run more it may want to bounce on touch down. Much lower and you run the risk of the tire rotating on the rim and severing your tube valve-stem.

Any taildragger tail wheel leads a hard life, and it's exciting if you have a failure, which should be avoided at all cost. I tend to keep both tube and tire near new, probabily replacing them after about 300 hours flying, or sooner if warranted. I always carry a spare tailwheel-tire and tube with me, which is not a lot of weight, and lives unobtrusivly under the Lightwing seat. I have had to use it a couple of times. When you buy tubes try and get the 'heavier duty' one's they are a bit thicker and a bit more puncture proof.

 

I tend to run 25-30 in my tailwheel also. And yes I have had punctures on rural properties, but don't think it is because of the high pressure. You've just got to expect one now and then, and be ready for it.

 

As a comparision, having a nose tire go flat on a training -wheel equipped aircraft can be just as inconvienent, and in the worse-case scenero can also involve prop damage requiring an engine strip-down....................................................................................................................................Maj...

Thanks for your comments Maj. I also run 6x6.00 tyres (Air Trac ). I might try 25psi all round from now on. Luckily my puncture was first noticed in the hangar. Carrying a spare tail wheel sounds like a great idea. Much easier than fixing a puncture in the field.

Cheers Dick

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always carried a tailwheel tyre and tube with me in the Citabria and used it several times. The wheel was capable of being split, ( bolted together) so was fairly easy to swap over. Not likely to be dangerous unless the conditions are marginal (X/W) and then you will just turn into wind (Hopefully) near the end of your ground roll. You could pack grass tightly into it if you got stuck. Some solid tyres are available. If the wheel shimmies it will get a hard time ( on tarmac). Think I would put a fair bit of pressure in it, myself. Nev

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I agree Facthunter, I tend to run my tailwheel on the hard side most of the time. In fact this is the first Pneumatic tailwheel I have used. I much prefer to run a solid one that can't go flat on you at all, and usually at the most inconvienient time !.............................................................Maj...024_cool.gif.7a88a3168ebd868f5549631161e2b369.gif

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...