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Commander Mckoy

Yoke Failure! For the inexperienced, with Commander McKoy

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Hello again fellow aviators! I'm sorry for my long absence. But I returned strong and with a new fresh video. Ever wondered what do you have to do if you have a Yoke Failure in-flight? Check my video then! I hope you enjoy.

 

 

Cheers!

 

Commander McKoy!

 

 

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Thanks. I've read about it, but never seen it demonstrated.

 

rgmwa

 

 

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I'm really glad that you liked it. And yes, it is an emergency that isn't trained very much in general, but it is very important. If I can remember, I performed at least 3 landings without the yoke for training as an instructor, self-taught. It's quite hardcore! Maybe someday I'll make a video "No Yoke Landing". Hehe.

 

Cheers,

 

Commander McKoy.

 

 

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Back in the early 70's, I was a right hand seat pax in a Cessna 310 over Darwin when the pilot said he couldn't move the ailerons left of centre. He made a very careful emergency approach into Darwin airport and landed successfully. During the landing roll, the yoke became fully locked (roll mode). The cause was a loose cable who's BNC connector had become lodged in the aileron chain at the back of the yoke. The early Cessna radios (500 series) had cables and inline connectors which extended out the rear of the mounting trays and which always had to be tied up but were just begging for situations like the one described to occur. Fortunately, modern avionics have cabling which is fixed to the rear of the racks so there is much less likelihood of plugs interfering with controls. One can never be too careful when carrying out inspections around aircraft control mechanisms.

 

 

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Wow. Thanks for sharing your amazing story! That's right. Always perform a thorough pre-flight inspection, even if you know the airplane or if you're flying it regularly.

 

Would like to see any procedure reviewed? Just ask me. Don't be shy. Hehehe.

 

My next video is a training flight in a Beechcraft Duchess 76 with a real engine failure and airstart, and we also performed a VOR-DME Approach to Runway 35 at Cascais( ICAO code: LPCS)

 

Cheers,

 

Commander McKoy.

 

 

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