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ben87r

RV-7/9 100 hourly costs.

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G,Day,

 

Just out of interest, what is a 100hrly worth for a NON builder/LAME? Looking for an aircraft when I get back over East and was toying with the idea of a RV/Mustang 11, wanting some real world figures.

 

Cheers

 

 

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G,Day,

Just out of interest, what is a 100hrly worth for a NON builder/LAME? Looking for an aircraft when I get back over East and was toying with the idea of a RV/Mustang 11, wanting some real world figures.

 

Cheers

Hi Ben, my last 100 hourly / annual for an O320 powered RV9a was $1700. This was a big one as the transponder, ASI, and Altimiter all had to be sent off for bench testing and calibration. Fuel gauge calibration was also required this time. My normal annual is around $1000.0o or a little less.

 

Mike

 

 

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Cheers Mike,

 

I got to admit, was expecting a bit more than that. Got a C210 figure from work the other day, nearly fell over.

 

 

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Hi Ben, my last 100 hourly / annual for an O320 powered RV9a was $1700. This was a big one as the transponder, ASI, and Altimiter all had to be sent off for bench testing and calibration. Fuel gauge calibration was also required this time. My normal annual is around $1000.0o or a little less.Mike

Ben87r, I think if the LAME lets the owner help with the donkey work an average 100 hr should cost less than $1000. The first one will be more as the LAME will have to go through the books and get to know the aircraft.

 

Mike, it is my belief that with the new CAO 100.5 requirements for instrument testing, all instruments can be checked in situ. That way the whole pitot/static system can be checked. Instruments and transponders do not have to be removed if they are within tolerance. The whole check excluding the fuel cal should take less than an hour if there are no problems.

 

 

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As a LAME / Chief Engineer I can understand the price difference between the C210 & RV7 checks. The age and complexity are very different + the Cessna SIDS/CPCP programmes need to be factored in also.

 

Compare this with a relatively new and simple airframe of an RV7 and you can expect it to be a fair bit cheaper.

 

Regarding pitot static system and instrument checks, these are hard to predict hours on due to the frequency of finding leaks or problems. I'd venture to say that for a full check done per the requirements an hour is a bit optimistic, especially if traditional instruments are involved.

 

BTW I know of a RV7A (VH-VWM) which is currently undergoing it's test flight programme and will then be up for sale (at Coldstream). This aircraft was assembled under instructor supervision in a training school, so if you are interested I can pass on any contact details to the appropriate people.

 

Regards,

 

Justin

 

 

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Thanks for the info guys.

 

Justin, thanks for the heads up but still be at least a year before I move home, then a lil while after that before I could do anything.

 

 

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As a LAME / Chief Engineer I can understand the price difference between the C210 & RV7 checks. The age and complexity are very different + the Cessna SIDS/CPCP programmes need to be factored in also.Compare this with a relatively new and simple airframe of an RV7 and you can expect it to be a fair bit cheaper.

 

Regarding pitot static system and instrument checks, these are hard to predict hours on due to the frequency of finding leaks or problems. I'd venture to say that for a full check done per the requirements an hour is a bit optimistic, especially if traditional instruments are involved.

 

BTW I know of a RV7A (VH-VWM) which is currently undergoing it's test flight programme and will then be up for sale (at Coldstream). This aircraft was assembled under instructor supervision in a training school, so if you are interested I can pass on any contact details to the appropriate people.

 

Regards,

 

Justin

Hi Justin

 

Happy NY, mate! Hope 2015 is a good year for you and crew.

 

Ben, my guess is that the first Annual will cost more than successive ones if all is ok. The LAME will want to look at a lot more the first time to make sure that all the hidden stuff is in good order. After that, he/she will be more relaxed especially if you only do the average 50-60 hours each year.

 

My annual is due early March and it will be an expensive one as the outer aileron hinges are being replaced. This means cutting and patching fabric, darn it.

 

Kaz

 

 

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As a LAME / Chief Engineer I can understand the price difference between the C210 & RV7 checks. The age and complexity are very different + the Cessna SIDS/CPCP programmes need to be factored in also.Compare this with a relatively new and simple airframe of an RV7 and you can expect it to be a fair bit cheaper.

 

Regarding pitot static system and instrument checks, these are hard to predict hours on due to the frequency of finding leaks or problems. I'd venture to say that for a full check done per the requirements an hour is a bit optimistic, especially if traditional instruments are involved.

 

BTW I know of a RV7A (VH-VWM) which is currently undergoing it's test flight programme and will then be up for sale (at Coldstream). This aircraft was assembled under instructor supervision in a training school, so if you are interested I can pass on any contact details to the appropriate people.

 

Regards,

 

Justin

I would be interested in the details

 

 

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Hey Kunnas, slightly off topic,

 

Killing time before my medical, where in town can get a decent coffee?

 

 

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Hey Kunnas, slightly off topic,

Killing time before my medical, where in town can get a decent coffee?

Sorry read this a little late for your coffee it may be beer o'clock now but the Kimberley Cafe is open and the country club and both do good coffee.

 

I am in Broome at the moment plenty of coffee places there

 

Cheers

 

 

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008_roflmao.gif.692a1fa1bc264885482c2a384583e343.gif

 

Nescafé blend 43, is about the best you'll get. The lat'e scene is yet to find Kununarra, if ever it does. 004_oh_yeah.gif.82b3078adb230b2d9519fd79c5873d7f.gif

Obviously been a while since you have been to town.

 

Drop in some time we even have TV now

 

 

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Annual required for private aircraft, not 100 hourly, though AD/ENG/4 engine checks apply each 100 hours if you do more than that in one year.

 

See CASA Maintenance guide for owners/operators, and AD/ENG/4.

 

 

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Annual required for private aircraft, not 100 hourly, though AD/ENG/4 engine checks apply each 100 hours if you do more than that in one year.See CASA Maintenance guide for owners/operators, and AD/ENG/4.

Hi 44032, I just had quick look at the CASA maint guide and found a paragraph that said private operators using CASA schedule 5 need to service their aircraft every 12 months or 100 whichever comes first (page 8). Can you point me to the spot where it says only an annual is required (except for AD/ENG 4). The less unnecessary maintenance I have to do the better.

 

 

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I'm sorry I mentioned it now.... Seems CASA has moved the goal posts again and altered the very clear wording in the Maintenance Guide for Pilots - page 5.

 

It now says: Section 4b: The TTIS indicated here will normally be 100hrs blah blah blah.. Some exceptions to this can be approved by CASA. In the case of a light aircraft (class B) operating only in private or aerial work, this could be more than 100 hours.

 

It used to say clearly that class B aircraft required just an annual inspection. Grrr........

 

Also, in CARs, I'll be buggered if I can now find any mention of how long a maint release is valid for - it just doesn't get a mention - at all (that I can see.) it has to be there, I'll keep at it. I used to have about five references that I could trot out to prove beyond a shadow of a doubt that it's annual.

 

4a in the guide says maint release expires in 12 months. That's the maximum that I can't find.

 

Back later.

 

Okay, I'm back.

 

CAAP 41-2(0) Maintenance requirements for class B aircraft:

 

3.3 The certificate of registration holder

 

of a private class B aircraft below 5700

 

kg may elect to have an annual inspection

 

using the CAA Maintenance Schedule.

 

This inspection would be required to

 

be completed every 12 months regardless

 

of hours flown.

 

Any way, most of us don't get anywhere near 100 hours a year, so it's all rather academic.

 

I'm back - AGAIN. I'm not going mad - here's another reference:

 

CAAP 42B-1(1) CASA MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE

 

4.2 The time-in-service between Periodic Inspections is to be 100 hours aeroplane time-in-service or 12 months, whichever is the earlier, and for aeroplanes below 5700 kg engaged in private operations this inspection may be performed annually irrespective of hours flown.

 

Of course, it is the annual inspection which leads to the new maintenance release being issued.

 

I'll be leaving now.

 

 

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Thanks very much 440032. I also did some digging and found it under CAR Schedule 5 part 2 (below). As you say though not many private owners do more than 100 hrs per year

 

 

 

 

 

2.3 A periodic inspection must be carried out on a private aircraft within the period of 1 year from:

 

(a) the day on which the aircraft's current certificate of airworthiness was issued; or

 

(b) the day on which the most recent general maintenance inspection on the aircraft was completed;

 

whichever is the later.

 

 

 

Note: no mention of the 100 hours in the above bit about private aircraft.

 

 

 

"private aircraft" means an aircraft:

 

(a) that is a class B aircraft; and

 

(b) that has a maximum take off weight of 5700 kg or less; and

 

© that is only used in private operations by:

 

(i) the owner of the aircraft; or

 

(ii) a person to whom the owner has provided the aircraft without receiving any remuneration from the person.

 

 

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The wording is not 100% understandable on any of CASAs requirements. I did an annual that was in excess of 12 months. The reason being that I was away from home, where the plane was when the maintenance release expired. No problem I just did it when I returned and was legal. Of course I could not fly it until the new maintenance release was in place.

 

 

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