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stuartmspencer

Latest Jabiru 2200 - reliability

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Hi All. The 2200 in my J160 has just had to be written off due to a sequence of failures which appear to relate to an accident prior to me taking ownership. I have been considering a few engine options, but it looks as though the simplest and most cost effective solution is to go with a replacement Jabiru of the latest specification. Although numbers and hours are still low with the latest iteration involving roller cam lifters, I would be very interested to hear of anyone who has had experience with the new model, and/or they have heard of any failures occurring. Has Jabiru ironed out the previous issues, many of which were prevalent in the early hydraulic versions (such as mine)? Many thanks, Stuart

 

 

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Hi All. The 2200 in my J160 has just had to be written off due to a sequence of failures which appear to relate to an accident prior to me taking ownership. I have been considering a few engine options, but it looks as though the simplest and most cost effective solution is to go with a replacement Jabiru of the latest specification. Although numbers and hours are still low with the latest iteration involving roller cam lifters, I would be very interested to hear of anyone who has had experience with the new model, and/or they have heard of any failures occurring. Has Jabiru ironed out the previous issues, many of which were prevalent in the early hydraulic versions (such as mine)? Many thanks, Stuart

 

 

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Hi All. The 2200 in my J160 has just had to be written off due to a sequence of failures which appear to relate to an accident prior to me taking ownership. I have been considering a few engine options, but it looks as though the simplest and most cost effective solution is to go with a replacement Jabiru of the latest specification. Although numbers and hours are still low with the latest iteration involving roller cam lifters, I would be very interested to hear of anyone who has had experience with the new model, and/or they have heard of any failures occurring. Has Jabiru ironed out the previous issues, many of which were prevalent in the early hydraulic versions (such as mine)? Many thanks, Stuart

Commiserations Stuart. I cannot help, but others may ask if your rego allows a CAMit engine.

 

 

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Hi All. The 2200 in my J160 has just had to be written off due to a sequence of failures which appear to relate to an accident prior to me taking ownership. I have been considering a few engine options, but it looks as though the simplest and most cost effective solution is to go with a replacement Jabiru of the latest specification. Although numbers and hours are still low with the latest iteration involving roller cam lifters, I would be very interested to hear of anyone who has had experience with the new model, and/or they have heard of any failures occurring. Has Jabiru ironed out the previous issues, many of which were prevalent in the early hydraulic versions (such as mine)? Many thanks, Stuart

Commiserations Stuart. I cannot help, but others may ask if your rego allows a CAMit engine.

 

 

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Sorry to hear Stuart. There are heaps of guys on this site who know the engines inside out and know how to get the best out of them. There a quite a few threads on the subject.

 

 

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Sorry to hear Stuart. There are heaps of guys on this site who know the engines inside out and know how to get the best out of them. There a quite a few threads on the subject.

 

 

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Today was the first problem with my 2200 engine after 14 years.

 

I was investigating whether it was really running a bit rough or if I was just imagining it. So I had this borrowed Dynavibe meter attached and was trying different weights on the spinner when it really began to run rough. So I did a leakdown, and after zero compression on no 4, I found a pushrod had fallen off the no 4 exhaust rocker. The last leakdown was about ten hours ago and all was fine.

 

I think the no 4 exhaust valve had stuck open to allow this to happen. I'll let you guys know what I see when the head comes off. In the meantime, any comments will be welcome.

 

 

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Today was the first problem with my 2200 engine after 14 years.

 

I was investigating whether it was really running a bit rough or if I was just imagining it. So I had this borrowed Dynavibe meter attached and was trying different weights on the spinner when it really began to run rough. So I did a leakdown, and after zero compression on no 4, I found a pushrod had fallen off the no 4 exhaust rocker. The last leakdown was about ten hours ago and all was fine.

 

I think the no 4 exhaust valve had stuck open to allow this to happen. I'll let you guys know what I see when the head comes off. In the meantime, any comments will be welcome.

 

 

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Today was the first problem with my 2200 engine after 14 years.I was investigating whether it was really running a bit rough or if I was just imagining it. So I had this borrowed Dynavibe meter attached and was trying different weights on the spinner when it really began to run rough. So I did a leakdown, and after zero compression on no 4, I found a pushrod had fallen off the no 4 exhaust rocker. The last leakdown was about ten hours ago and all was fine.

 

I think the no 4 exhaust valve had stuck open to allow this to happen. I'll let you guys know what I see when the head comes off. In the meantime, any comments will be welcome.

Do you have oil pipes or hollow push rods for oil feed to rockers.

 

 

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Today was the first problem with my 2200 engine after 14 years.I was investigating whether it was really running a bit rough or if I was just imagining it. So I had this borrowed Dynavibe meter attached and was trying different weights on the spinner when it really began to run rough. So I did a leakdown, and after zero compression on no 4, I found a pushrod had fallen off the no 4 exhaust rocker. The last leakdown was about ten hours ago and all was fine.

 

I think the no 4 exhaust valve had stuck open to allow this to happen. I'll let you guys know what I see when the head comes off. In the meantime, any comments will be welcome.

Do you have oil pipes or hollow push rods for oil feed to rockers.

 

 

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Thanks guys. I've been flying with the Jabiru 2200 for several years now so have quite a bit of experience with them. However my engines have been early hydraulics. I placed an order for a new 2200 so am hoping that they've ironed out the common issues. Fingers crossed!!

 

But if anyone knows anyone with the latest engine, let me know.

 

 

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Thanks guys. I've been flying with the Jabiru 2200 for several years now so have quite a bit of experience with them. However my engines have been early hydraulics. I placed an order for a new 2200 so am hoping that they've ironed out the common issues. Fingers crossed!!

 

But if anyone knows anyone with the latest engine, let me know.

 

 

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I don't know how many hours your engine has done, Bruce. The pushrod will come off if the valve jams. It might only be momentary but that is all it will take, usually. If an engine isn't right don't keep flying it. (any vibration any loss of power, investigate it straight away). I doubt I would go over 500 hours without removing the heads, myself as most don't know how to check valve guide wear in situ and it's a bit imprecise anyhow. It's not a big job. Nev

 

 

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I don't know how many hours your engine has done, Bruce. The pushrod will come off if the valve jams. It might only be momentary but that is all it will take, usually. If an engine isn't right don't keep flying it. (any vibration any loss of power, investigate it straight away). I doubt I would go over 500 hours without removing the heads, myself as most don't know how to check valve guide wear in situ and it's a bit imprecise anyhow. It's not a big job. Nev

 

 

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Thanks for the comments guys. The engine has done just under 500 trouble-free hours but I reckon it should have been de-coked before now. It has solid pushrods with external oil-feed pipes. It actually has the early brass tee-pieces on the oil supply. I hope to have the head off later today and I'll take a picture or two. Rest assured it won't fly till its fixed properly. And maybe I'll start using Moreys or similar.

 

The other compressions all went 80/74 ( or within a whisker of that) and I was surprised how even they were. I usually do the leakdown cold and the variation is bigger then but so far the softest has been ok. This time, the no. 4 ( the last one I did of course) had zero compression.

 

I reckon that if it had happened in the air there would have been enough power to be ok, but I'm pleased it happened on the ground.

 

 

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Thanks for the comments guys. The engine has done just under 500 trouble-free hours but I reckon it should have been de-coked before now. It has solid pushrods with external oil-feed pipes. It actually has the early brass tee-pieces on the oil supply. I hope to have the head off later today and I'll take a picture or two. Rest assured it won't fly till its fixed properly. And maybe I'll start using Moreys or similar.

 

The other compressions all went 80/74 ( or within a whisker of that) and I was surprised how even they were. I usually do the leakdown cold and the variation is bigger then but so far the softest has been ok. This time, the no. 4 ( the last one I did of course) had zero compression.

 

I reckon that if it had happened in the air there would have been enough power to be ok, but I'm pleased it happened on the ground.

 

 

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One out of four and you have no hope of staying in the air. I had a cont 0-300 hydraulic lifter fail and it was going slowly down and that's one out of six. Nev

 

 

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One out of four and you have no hope of staying in the air. I had a cont 0-300 hydraulic lifter fail and it was going slowly down and that's one out of six. Nev

 

 

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Not what I expected.. the exhaust valve seat had come out and was only held there by the valve. No wonder the compression was zero.

 

I wonder why it came out. The main force is combustion pressure on the valve face, and this force is keeping the seat in.

 

There was no other obvious damage, and the engine never runs hot. It was cleaner inside than I thought.

 

 

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Not what I expected.. the exhaust valve seat had come out and was only held there by the valve. No wonder the compression was zero.

 

I wonder why it came out. The main force is combustion pressure on the valve face, and this force is keeping the seat in.

 

There was no other obvious damage, and the engine never runs hot. It was cleaner inside than I thought.

 

IMG_0642.JPG.7d17d71b13e706683f77a628f5885a08.JPG

 

 

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You won't believe me, but I was going to suggest the seat but it's something you notice straight away, when you remove the head. When they are installed the interference is about .005" depending on the diameter. Aluminium expands more than the nickel iron alloy in the seats. If the fit isn't tight enough it falls out and usually jams crooked or breaks into pieces. Some fit them using liquid nitrogen to shrink the seat in aluminium alloy heads to ensure no damage when installing. Maybe it wasn't tight enough or been overheated. Nev

 

 

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