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Robbo

Pilot dies in light aircraft crash south of Townsville

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Thanks Garfly. I accidentally copied a truncated link and didn't check it. Annoying that you can't edit posts after a certain time.

 

 

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Its a good report but does leave a few questions unanswered. We don't know why the engine stopped. Even though there was a fire I would have thought that a disassembly of the engine would tell if it is was seized, or there was a lack of oil flow or anything significantly broken internally. What was to position of the ignition switches, fuel selector?

 

This quote from the report is chilling, I wonder if as part of the pre takeoff checks out of habit Ross turned the fuel to the engine off?

 

Mr Millard climbed into the aircraft, secured the harness and discussed matters with Mr Lowry including the position of the fuel selectors which was different from the Lightwing that Mr Millard owned and flew.

 

 

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I have seen on quite a few occasions where folks put the cowling down so that it may get scratched (see photo), that is, they turn it upside down. Why?

 

 

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I have seen on quite a few occasions where folks put the cowling down so that it may get scratched (see photo), that is, they turn it upside down. Why?

Ross I expect would have been making sure sand and moist salt water did not get into the locking down fastening arrangement parts..

 

 

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Even though there was a fire I would have thought that a disassembly of the engine would tell if it is was seized, or there was a lack of oil flow or anything significantly broken internally. What was to position of the ignition switches, fuel selector?

If you inspected the remains of the aircraft you may have a different opinion.

 

Things like melted heads, valves and springs feet from the impact point, no identifible switches let alone what position they might have been in. Suffice to say not a lot of evidence available at the scene.

 

 

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I apologise if this has been posted elsewhere, but I just came across the Coroner's report for this accident...released back in July 2018. Interesting to note that the Coroner is himself an RAA member and pilot and also holds a PPL.Coroner's findings into the death of Ross Millard

That link gives us:

 

Error 404: File not found

 

 

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Just look up Queensland coroners court and it is in 2018 reports

 

I found it about 3 weeks ago as since his accident I started checking about 12 months after it, sad that we will never know why the engine failed, sure looks like he tried a turn back for what reason we will never know.

 

I thought the coroners report was quite good

 

 

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This is a really good and thorough report and I believe accurate.When I flew to Natfly with Ross in his GR Lightwing he stated during discussion of engine failure procedures that the GR would turn on a dime in the event of engine failure and turning back would be high on the option list. In fact he pretty much described the manoeuvre the same way the witnesses did. I recall thinking not at this weight I hope as we were fairly loaded up with gear.

 

It struck me suddenly upon reading this...every pilot who has died in a light aircraft crash that I have known was flying someone else’s aeroplane.

 

RIP Ross.

Win I guess that was at Temora. I have happy memories of meeting you two blokes.

 

 

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Win I guess that was at Temora. I have happy memories of meeting you two blokes.

Yeah. It was a great trip. I was real fortunate to score that seat and spend time with Ross in his Lightwing.

 

 

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It appears that on this occasion we have a coroner with not only an excellent grasp of the flying environment, but one with the persistence to tease out a vital factor that many might have overlooked.

 

 

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It appears that on this occasion we have a coroner with not only an excellent grasp of the flying environment, but one with the persistence to tease out a vital factor that many might have overlooked.

Old Koreelah, yes the coroner is a RAA member and does have a good grasp of aviation related matters which was good to see.

 

Only one person really knows what went wrong or what actions were made but our little mate is no longer here to tell us unfortunately.

 

 

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...Only one person really knows what went wrong or what actions were made but our little mate is no longer here to tell us unfortunately.

Sad but true, Alf.

 

My plane flies with two good gauges he sold me. Ross contributed much to our movement and to this forum.

 

I bet he'd want us all to realise that even the most experienced aviator can make a split second error of judgement.

 

 

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Sad but true, Alf.My plane flies with two good gauges he sold me. Ross contributed much to our movement and to this forum.

 

I bet he'd want us all to realise that even the most experienced aviator can make a split second error of judgement.

Doesn’t matter who you are or how many hours you have, you are human and you are not perfect, none of us are although many think they are infallible to these types of accidents or any accident a matter of fact.

 

The thing is you alone are responsible for whatever decision you make while manipulating the controls, you do it right you live you do it wrong you may not. How we as humans react under a pressure situation is an unknown until after the fact.

 

 

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Sad but true, Alf.My plane flies with two good gauges he sold me. Ross contributed much to our movement and to this forum.

 

I bet he'd want us all to realise that even the most experienced aviator can make a split second error of judgement.

Agree, his mateship is always missed at airstrips and events he attended; a great fellow aviator to have known and always remembered.

 

 

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