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DrZoos

Insurance for L2

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Although the Tech Manual is out of date in relation to the numbering in the CAO's (esp 95.55) the cross mapping from CAO95.55 as it was in 2007 to today shows that there is no CASA list of maintenance schedule if you are looking at homebuilt etc and if the manufacturer does not have one for the factory built airframes then its the Tech Manuals periodic inspection that must be followed.

 

Basically the 'manufacturer' sets the Maintenance schedule ... for hombuilts (95.10, 95.32 and 95.55) that's the OWNER and if it came out of a factory then its the factory schedule or the RAAus schedule of maintenance if the factory did not provide one.

 

 

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.... instance in many engineering professional indemnity policies they have high excesses ....

and you need to keep the policy in place for some years after you stop the work.
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and you need to keep the policy in place for some years after you stop the work.

In some instances. In others the insurance is for when the work is done not when the claim is made. If you do work in 2015 and then is 2016 someone makes a claim against you it may be against the policy you had in place at the time or it may be your current one.

 

The overall point I guess I am making is that if you take out the insurance as a L2 to protect yourself you get to confirm the details.

 

 

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I'm in the situation of maintaining my own "24" as an L1 for private use.

 

I understand the complexities of requiring an L2 to sign off such an aircraft for "hire and reward".

 

I'm actually of the mindset that my aircraft should never be used in the future for "hire and reward" but not sure that is enforceable with future owners.

 

 

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Yep i too know several people who have been asked for a maintenance release form for their RAA aircraft on a ramp check...

 

Do a google search for "RAA maintenance release" there are plenty of results indicating it is a common term

 

 

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If there is one, what is it's period of validity and who can sign it? What would invalidate it? Nev

 

 

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Yep i too know several people who have been asked for a maintenance release form for their RAA aircraft on a ramp check...

Do a google search for "RAA maintenance release" there are plenty of results indicating it is a common term

I'm keen to know what these several people offered up too meet the request and was it accepted by those carrying out the ramp check.

 

 

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as in 43 that piece of paper has been given on three separate occasions by me with out it you are grounded twice at wagga and once at alburyneil

Agreed... If you have a ramp check without a form such as this maintenance record how can you demonstrate that maintenance is up to date. Personally, I think it is not so important which particular form is used. If you can develop your own system to document and trace required maintenance then great. However in lieu of reinventing the wheel the RAAus maintenance record form provides a convenient solution where you can track maintenance and record daily inspections.

 

Yes it does look a lot like a CASA maint release, but I guess this is inevitable, given that it is providing a way to record and track the same things. The difference as I see it is in once word. RELEASE means that as a LAME I make a statement about the serviceability of the VH aircraft, where as a RECORD notes work done and ultimately the owner (who is the maintenance controller) needs to come to their own conclusion regarding airworthiness of their aircraft.

 

The Maintenance Record does not need to be seen as a sinister way of making RAAus the same as CASA. This form has existed for many years, and considering the lack of adequate maintenance recording I see, I believe its use (or a suitable alternative) should be mandatory. Without it tracking of lifed components (ie 5year rubber replacement) or timed inspections (ie transponder or instrument calibrations) becomes haphazard and things get missed. The evudence I see is that relying on ones memory to track such items does not work.

 

 

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I agree with all that Myra, except for the enforcement bit. I reckon that if it were left as an education issue then that's ok.

 

What gets me angry is for some ill-educated government thu... er I mean enforcement officers, with the ticket to come and bully everyone.

 

 

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I agree with all that Myra, except for the enforcement bit. I reckon that if it were left as an education issue then that's ok.What gets me angry is for some ill-educated government thu... er I mean enforcement officers, with the ticket to come and bully everyone.

I suspect we are on the same page in reality. I am not necessarily arguing that the Maintenance Record as supplied by RAAus should be mandatory, but am suggesting that each aircraft owner be required to have an effective system that lets them track, document and demonstrate the ongoing airworthiness of their aircraft. A byproduct of such an effective system would be that airworthiness status can also be simply demonstrated to any friendly ramp check personnel upon request. The Maintenance Record form is one way of effectively doing this. It is a simple form and when used properly contains all the elements needed to record aircraft airworthiness status between 100hr/annual inspections, right down to the daily inspection. Every aircraft owner/maintenance controller is supposed to be doing this anyway. If someone chooses to use another system to track maintenance, no problem, howeevr it is hard to imagine another system that is as effective or simple as the Maintenance Record form provided by RAAus.

 

Ramp check 'bullying' is another issue. I have no particular concerns about friendly ramp checks, as long as their main focus is to educate and enhance safety. I also have no issue with ramp checks being used to weed out people who show contempt or disregard for the rules and responsibilities they have as a pilot. I have not experienced a ramp check 'bully', but nothing that I have said would condone or endorse that style of enforcement.

 

 

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There have been some stories of bullying at ramp checks. Personally, I have never seen a ramp-check and I hope I never will. My maintenance release or whatever is not always in the plane and my last rego card spent a few weeks under the fuel tank till I found time to get it out. So I would have failed, not that the plane was not maintained properly or not registered. But I admit to having book-keeping shortcomings which need improving.

 

What we could do is let our club-mates know we would welcome a friendly ramp-check from one of them from time to time.

 

If any club were to try this out on a voluntary basis at least to start, and it worked, there is the possibility of RAAus eventually making some sort of system where CASA would be hopefully out of a job.

 

 

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Under what part of the Regs are ramp checks on RAA aircraft undertaken?

 

I know I am not completely across the rules but from my recall Reg 139 on documents required to be within the aircraft for flight of an Australian Aircraft is not one that I am subject to under 95.10 ... I know I need to comply with the RAA Ops and Tech Manuals ... and a compliance check under Ops 2.03 does not require the docs to be in the aircraft (or even at the aircraft) so fail to see how not having a document on me on the day is actually anyones business provided the requisite documents exist and I am cooperative with a person authorized to do a compliance check under the Ops 2.03 and offer to provide them at a suitable time.

 

What have I missed?

 

Oh and can anyone confirm that RAAus Ops 1.01 on the requirement to "possess a personal copy" an electronic Ops Manual is actually met by knowing that its available on the RAAus website? or are we all flying around illegally given the last disc of the Ops manual that was a personal electronic was not the current Ops Manual?

 

 

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Thanks greatly. Here is my marked up review of the text on the link:

 

The inspector will ask you for, or confirm, your pilot certificate and other relevant documentation That's nice, I like to chat

 

  • You should carry your pilot certificate with you when you fly. However, some sport organisations may have different rules, so check your organisation’s operational manual or regulations. It is also suggested that you carry a copy of your log book page with last flight review. As its only a should and the RAAus ops manual does not make it a must I will tell them my RAAus number and offer to forward a copy in the post
     
  • Current/valid RAAO membership I will tell them my RAAus number and offer to forward a copy in the post
     
  • Aeroplane operated in accordance with the privileges and limitations of your pilot’s certificate It's sitting on the ground not doing much and of course my answer is Yes, I operating in accord with the limits of my RAAus pilots certificate
     
  • Correct endorsements for flight Yes, I operating in accord with the endorsement of my RAAus pilots certificate
     
  • You must carry your current aviation medical certificate if applicable and you must be compliant with any restrictions or endorsements on your medical certificate or driver’s licence (e.g. the wearing of corrective lenses). I am compliant with the restrictions of my medical and will forward a copy in the post
     

 

The inspector will then check your preparation for flight

 

Flight plan

 

  • Have you maintained a navigation/fuel log? Yes. They can look at my clear plastic knee bag and chinagraph notes (unless I have cleaned it off for the next flight)
     
  • Have you made a careful study of forecast weather and applicable NOTAMs? Yes thanks. They are either in my knee bag or at home - you can see them or I will print out my internet log history and forward in the post
     
  • ≥ 50nm from departure point ELT/PLB required for two-place aeroplane Yep - its that thingy in the knee bag or its not required (single seater)
     
  • If carrying a passenger - passenger endorsement Yes, it will be on the pilots certificate copy in the post.
     
  • ≥ 25nm from departure point – cross country endorsement Yes, it will be on the pilots certificate copy in the post.
     
  • Are you carrying the appropriate, current charts and documents? Yes thanks. The chart is in my knee bag and I am damned if you can figure out how to carry ERSA and have it easily accessible in a cockpitless aircraft with a rear engine ... even the chinagraph is drilled and lanyarded to me in flight
     
  • Are they easily accessible? Its a no-cockpit aircraft with a rear prop - SAFELY accessible means easily is I have it with me and can refer when I land
     
  • Are you carrying an EFB for your charts and documents? Back-ups considered? No thanks - this a pleasure flight on an MTOW 300kg aircraft not a 737
     

 

Finally, the inspector will check your aircraft

 

The inspector will check:

 

  • The aircraft’s registration is current Yes - see the aircraft regn in the cockpit from RAAus
     
  • Condition of the aircraft It's fine thank you very much - I am the designer and I state its appropriate fro today ... and none of your damn business if you want to push the issue
     
  • The daily inspection Yes I did one of those this morning, thanks for asking
     
  • Pilot’s operating handbook (POH) or flight manual N/a there is no POH or flight manual for this aircraft
     
  • Emergency checklists I have them in my head thank you very much for asking
     
  • Warning placard if applicable Yes thanks - little sticker on the dash/cross bar depending on aircraft
     
  • Copy of CofA if applicable N/a
     
  • Aircraft has a placarded maximum take-off weight in accordance with the flight manual N/a
     
  • Aircraft is operated within weight and balance limits If in a trike its N/a as the concept of balance does not apply (love to see their face on that one) and if its the Sapphire its fine - I'm the designer and state that it is within the limits I am working to today
     
  • Required emergency equipment on board is serviceable and accessible if applicable N/a for the most part or the PLB in the knee bag
     
  • Personal locator beacon (PLB) has current registration with the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) PLB in the knee bag
     

 

Document references

 

  • Operations manual Not required to be taken with me - It's on the RAAus website
     
  • CAO 95 series as applicable Not required to be taken with me - It's accessible through the RAAus website
     

 

Operations

 

  • Responsibilities of the pilot in command before flight – CAR 233 Yep - see earlier answers on the flight planning and refer to the chinagraph on the knee bag
     
  • Planning of flight by the pilot in command – CAR 239 Yep - see earlier answers on the flight planning and refer to the chinagraph on the knee bag
     
  • Navigation logs – CAR 78 Yep - see earlier answers on the flight planning and refer to the chinagraph on the knee bag - not an international flight so not required to cover in equence all the items listed in CAR 78(2)
     
  • Fuel requirements – CAR 234 Yep - see earlier answers on the flight planning and refer to the chinagraph on the knee bag
     
  • Weather and NOTAM – CAR 233 & AIP ENR 1-10 paragraph 1. Yep - see earlier answers on the flight planning and refer to the chinagraph on the knee bag + ERSA in the knee bag
     
  • EFBs – CAO 82.0, CAR 233 and CAAP 233-1(1) N/a
     

 

Aircraft

 

  • Checklists – CAR 232 I have them in my head thank you very much for asking as CASA have not required a specific on for the aircraft I am flying ... as its the only one of its type in existence I am not surprised by this
     
  • Emergency equipment – CAR 252A (two-place aeroplane only) Generally N/a as they are single seat aircraft and exempt under 252A but if I am in the two seat trike can we have a sit down over coffee and discuss how being exempt from 252 that gives CASA the power to mandate the equipment sits with 252A that mandates it for two seaters??
     

 

 

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