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The complete rear fuse, now a few days more to translate it all into 2D CNC files (.dwg or .dfx doesn't matter) and start cutting some sheets later in the week  ...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 rear fuse bits.jpg

 

Edited by bexrbetter
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10 minutes ago, Marty_d said:

Are your skins the same thickness as your spars?

For the rudder ribs (not spars)? Yes. Where possible it is only one thickness throughout the entire plane

 

Or did you mean other? 0.5mm might be a bit light for the wing spars, but I'm happy for you to try it.

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Man, been putting some hours in, seen sunrise a couple of times.

 

I nested the entire Rear Fuse, HS and VS, then I virtually built the entire assembly again in the software to find the small fitting issues, and there were some, mostly rivet holes not lining up, couple of part sizes not change or moved (or not) at some stages.. And when I say build, starting with flat sheets as if they had just been cut. I folded and fitted them all together piece by piece then modified them if required, transposed to flat sheet, fold again and repeat.

 

There's also the one that used to catch me out  a few times years back, and that's creating stuff in 3D as flat material not allowing for the thickness of the material in the real world, and over a few parts, that error can build up quite quickly.

 

So now tonight I celebrate my first sheet of 6 for the  in .DXF file ready to go to the laser and fold shop early next week. I tried hard to fit everything onto 5 sheets, but just couldn't, dang narn it!

 

 

 

 

rear fuse nest DXF.jpg rear fuse nest.jpg

Edited by bexrbetter
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Oh, and have a name for the plane at the moment.

 

It was a tough one, but I took in the considerations of my Sino -Australia relationship and America being the key market, the plane type, specs, mission suitable for ect and eventually I came up with the perfect fit ...

 

"Bob".

 

.

 

 

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What was wrong with the name, "Glorious New Golden Treasure Flight Product of Chairman Mao's Red East?" 

 

You could have even have the name plates produced with "Gloroius New Golden Treasere Flight Porduct of Chairman Mao's Red East?", to give it real authenticity. 

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That doesn’t work as an acronym. At least BOB could be built of bits, or bag of bolts.

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Bec I haven't been following this project closely, so may have missed this point. It occurs to me that you're trying to get the max. number of component parts out of each al. sheet.

Lots of brainwork, but I believe software exists that can rearrange 2-D shapes to minimise wastage.

I guess then there would have to be a trade-off between optimum component shape and minimising waste of material.

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Hi Bex,

I love what you are doing on the computer but you don't seem to be allowing for the"grain" direction in the sheets of material. Aluminium sheets are rolled to thickness

and so they are not really a homogeneous ( could not think of the correct term!) material. In "Alclad" sheets this is hidden by the pure aluminium coating but you can

see it more clearly on the 6061-T6 sheets. It is much easier to crack aluminium bending it across the grain than with it and it also affects fatigue life.

It will probably mean having to buy more sheets of material!

When you do your parts for bending you will need to have a "bending allowance" which in most cases gains you material. Also you will need to supply the bending

shop with a line to line up their blade for bending ( different if done on a bender or brake press). The bend radius is determined by the thickness of the material.

All this information is available in " The Aircraftsman Handbook" or in AC-43.

Ray

 

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29 minutes ago, Raytol said:

When you do your parts for bending you will need to have a "bending allowance" which in most cases gains you material. Also you will need to supply the bending

shop with a line to line up their blade for bending ( different if done on a bender or brake press). The bend radius is determined by the thickness of the material.

All this information is available in " The Aircraftsman Handbook" or in AC-43.

Ray

 

My bend radius is around 4T so grain isn't an issue.

 

All my sheets have alignment tits or other for the bend shop to line up, saves a lot of time and is very accurate, as indicated in red below

 

Later when my tits are cut off (wait, what?), a relief corner radius is left, as is in the corner of the inverted V bend point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

corner radius.jpg
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