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IBob

Savannah S Build Notes - Some Tools

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I made a little wedge with the proper size hole drilled it in that allows me to pull a rivet at a 45 degree angle.

I did the same: drilled some MS rod then just cut it off at an angle with the hacksaw, making little flat faced, angled 'beads'. I made a couple at different angles.

 

Sometimes they work perfectly, sometimes the rivet stem breaks high, and has to be cleaned back

 

 

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I made a little wedge with the proper size hole drilled it in that allows me to pull a rivet at a 45 degree angle.

 

I did the same: drilled some MS rod then just cut it off at an angle with the hacksaw, making little flat faced, angled 'beads'. I made a couple at different angles.Sometimes they work perfectly, sometimes the rivet stem breaks high, and has to be cleaned back

Do you have any pictures as to how this works in operation?

 

 

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Countersinking rivets.

 

The manual suggests using an ordinary drill for this.

 

I started my build with the 2 cheap drillsets I already had, later bought a Bosch set (1mm size steps), and more recently a Hitachi set (lower quality but smaller steps in sizes and multiple drills of each size).

 

For countersinking rivets you need a drill tip angle of 120 degrees (I think). The Bosch and Hitachi are 120 degrees, the cheap drillsets (I now realise) are pointier than that, which explains why my early countersinks were difficult and required a lot of care to avoid opening out the rivet hole:

 

Another good reason why I should have bought a good drill set at the start of the build.

 

The best way to do countersinks is with a proper piloted 120Degree countersink bit: the pilot is an extended tip that sits in the rivet hole and holds the bit central, so avoiding tool chatter.

 

upload_2017-6-5_11-10-54.jpeg.3542142345b9202f0d1a7cf5fecf4e98.jpeg

 

They are available here, but very expensive and I would need 3 sizes. Can anyone point me to an affordable source?

 

upload_2017-6-5_11-10-36.jpeg.20c0ae9b63bedf58e99200e4d5ebeee5.jpeg

 

 

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Countersinking rivets.

The manual suggests using an ordinary drill for this.

 

I started my build with the 2 cheap drillsets I already had, later bought a Bosch set (1mm size steps), and more recently a Hitachi set (lower quality but smaller steps in sizes and multiple drills of each size).

 

For countersinking rivets you need a drill tip angle of 120 degrees (I think). The Bosch and Hitachi are 120 degrees, the cheap drillsets (I now realise) are pointier than that, which explains why my early countersinks were difficult and required a lot of care to avoid opening out the rivet hole:

 

Another good reason why I should have bought a good drill set at the start of the build.

 

The best way to do countersinks is with a proper piloted 120Degree countersink bit: the pilot is an extended tip that sits in the rivet hole and holds the bit central, so avoiding tool chatter.

 

[ATTACH=full]50630[/ATTACH][ATTACH=full]50631[/ATTACH]

 

They are available here, but very expensive and I would need 3 sizes. Can anyone point me to an affordable source?

DSCF1233.JPG.18eecd8bd3ed0b3a14e76f40dff8621a.JPG

 

 

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They are available here, but very expensive and I would need 3 sizes. Can anyone point me to an affordable source?

You could try: 82, 120, & 130 Degree Countersink Cutters | Brown Aviation & Aircraft Tools

 

or Counter Sink Cutters - Cleaveland Aircraft Tool

 

It would be a good idea to get a countersink cage too.

 

rgmwa

 

 

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The kit comes with 'carpet' to line the cockpit and luggage areas. Some of this is easily positioned, some not so much so.

Most people I spoke with use Ados F2, some used a combination of the regular F2 and the spraycan version. I went through a lot of regular F2 and a couple of spraycans, and still wasn't done.

So I mixed my remaining F2 with 2 way thinners and things suddenly got a whole lot easier:

The mixture is easily applied and spread, on both carpet and aircraft, using a paintbrush.

It is slow to dry initially, so application does not need to be hurried, and the carpet can be repositioning if necessary.

The final bond is not as strong as the straight F2, probably because the coating is quite thin. But it seems to be more than adequate, and this may even be an advantage if the carpet is removed or replaced at a later date.

 

It is a heady mix...so a mask is recommended.

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https://www.henchman.com.au/Countersink-Tools/Micro-Stop-Countersinks/pl.php

 

I just bought one of these from here in OZ..very cheap actually. Aircraft spruce version is more than double the price in aussie dollars then add the freight. I bought one as it is used a lot building the S21. They do a lot of countersinking and skin dimpling. Its the one that you see in the Rans current S21 build videos it doesnt have the plastic foot but you can easily make one if required

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