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Soleair

Best seed for grass strip?

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The problem with grass is the bare parts which erode and become quite rough. You will be knocking your plane around if you don't repair (topdress) the well used parts. Perhaps moving it a bit might work. (like a grass cricket pitch). Nev

 

 

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In many places, where it isn't likely to get into the waterways, people mount a tank with a spreader bar onto a small trailer and collect used sump oil from the local service stations and spread it on the bare ground.

 

Prevents weed growth and binds any dust, maintaining a smooth surface.

 

Sounds very eco-bad but isn't really, as long as it's away from waterways.

 

If you want to plant grass later just leave it for 12mths and the oil breaks down allowing seed germination and/or root propagation.

 

It's been a regular outback road maintenance method in dusty areas for around 100yrs ...

 

 

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Thanks, HIC. That sounds eminently practical, though as you say, some may see it as environmentally non pc.

 

I've had the strip 'harleyed' today, by a bobcat with a spiked roller, hydraulically powered. It didn't remove as much of the topsoil as I'd expected. The result is that the surface is largely levelled, at least adequately for my purposes, but it has left most of the existing grass (ryegrass?) in place. I'll maybe post a pic or two tomorrow.

 

I'm actually quite pleased about this, as I had been trying to come up with solutions for type of seed, & method of watering, fertilising, etc. And all this on my shoestring budget, with no farming machinery. So I think now I'll just let the dust settle, build my hangar, & hopefully go flying.

 

I don't expect much growth of anything - weeds or grass - until we get some rain (none in the forseeable), or until next spring. At that time, I'll either get some sheep, or just bite the bullet & mow it as required.

 

Thanks to all who have contributed.

 

Bruce

 

 

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sump oil is no longer sitting around service stations, its used as fuel for marine diesel engines

It's collected and recycled in city areas but not in regional areas. Further out the service stations are still very happy to get rid of it any way they can. A lot of it gets burnt off at the tip. Quite a bit more gets used by the road-gangs when repairing potholes to soften the existing bitumen - it saves on the amount of diesel they have to use.

 

I don't know if Soleair is far enough out for there to be a surplus of it, but I doubt it's collected for recycling further than 50km or so from a major city because there's probably not enough of it to make it viable.

 

 

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It's collected and recycled in city areas but not in regional areas. Further out the service stations are still very happy to get rid of it any way they can. A lot of it gets burnt off at the tip. Quite a bit more gets used by the road-gangs when repairing potholes to soften the existing bitumen - it saves on the amount of diesel they have to use.I don't know if Soleair is far enough out for there to be a surplus of it, but I doubt it's collected for recycling further than 50km or so from a major city because there's probably not enough of it to make it viable.

It’s not a good way to go, everyone landing and taking off will need to wash their aircaft with a degreasing detergent, and it tends to layer and clump. Grass is good; no need to overcomplicate this

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It’s not a good way to go, everyone landing and taking off will need to wash their aircaft with a degreasing detergent, and it tends to layer and clump. Grass is good; no need to overcomplicate this

No, that's not so. I'd suggest that the majority of folks in Australia have regularly driven or walked on oiled roads and pathways. Unless you're extremely versed in the method you would never recognise it.

The oil doesn't transfer back to the tyres, it's not slippery and it certainly doesn't 'layer and clump', whatever that is ...

 

Whatever, like I said, it's been used successfully, unobtrusively and unintrusively for 100yrs or more in low rainfall areas, but what would the old bushies know anyway.

 

Come to think of it - who rushes off to wash their car or aircraft with degreasing detergent after landing or driving on bitumen? There's not much difference in practical terms except the oiled road is softer and the aggregate is smaller.

 

 

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No, that's not so. I'd suggest that the majority of folks in Australia have regularly driven or walked on oiled roads and pathways. Unless you're extremely versed in the method you would never recognise it.The oil doesn't transfer back to the tyres, it's not slippery and it certainly doesn't 'layer and clump', whatever that is ...

Whatever, like I said, it's been used successfully, unobtrusively and unintrusively for 100yrs or more in low rainfall areas, but what would the old bushies know anyway.

 

Come to think of it - who rushes off to wash their car or aircraft with degreasing detergent after landing or driving on bitumen? There's not much difference in practical terms except the oiled road is softer and the aggregate is smaller.

I raced on it for six years at various tracks, then we got smarter.

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I suspect it is illegal under environmental law to spread sump oil anywhere today. But I’m no expert.

 

 

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Would a perennial such as lucerne do the trick? Once it has established a deep root system I think it might withstand being mown short.

Growing up on a farm that had couch and grew lucerne neither would be very good. Lucerne gets very clumpy after it has been cut a fair few times. Couch may cover well and be low resistance to wheels but its tolerance to traffic is poor and it allows weeds to grow though quite easily. If one hasn't done much preparation to the soil under the grass (i.e. some sought of fine gravel base) it wouldn't take too much to go through the grass and get bogged if the soil gets slushy when wet.

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Anyone know if grass has ever been used for aircraft take off and landing?

?? Please expand Turbs.

I am sure you know of grass strips so I am guessing you have a cryptic point to your question?

 

 

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No, that's not so. I'd suggest that the majority of folks in Australia have regularly driven or walked on oiled roads and pathways. Unless you're extremely versed in the method you would never recognise it.The oil doesn't transfer back to the tyres, it's not slippery and it certainly doesn't 'layer and clump', whatever that is ...

Whatever, like I said, it's been used successfully, unobtrusively and unintrusively for 100yrs or more in low rainfall areas, but what would the old bushies know anyway...

Yallaroi Shire Council made extensive use of oil on its roads until recent decades. I suspect the increase in oil recycling might have been a factor in the practice declining.

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?? Please expand Turbs.I am sure you know of grass strips so I am guessing you have a cryptic point to your question?

I'm in a state of utter disbelief; the location is in Victoria, in an area where, if you want a lawn, you just let the grass grow, and mow it short.

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