Jump to content
  • Welcome to Recreational Flying!
    A compelling community experience for all aviators
    Intuitive, Social, Engaging...Registration is FREE.
    Register Log in
Sign in to follow this  
ev17ifly2

Torque wrench

Recommended Posts

Hi, what brand of torque wrench(s)  is preferred by aircraft builders and maintainers ?  I'm going to need to purchase one in order to build my BushCat kit when it arrives.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's almost like asking how long is a piece of string.

 

Here's some straight talk on  choosing a toque wrench:  http://wbtools.com.au/how-to-choose-the-right-torque-wrench

 

I bought my torque wrench from ALDI. How often do I used it? There are about eight head bolts on each of the two cylinders of my bike. I've had the heads on and off about three times in six years. Never because of a blown  gasket or warped aluminium heads. If you have to buy a torque wrench, consider the reputation of the manufacturer, or google its reviews. Here is a review for the ALDI one http://caravanersforum.com/viewtopic.php?t=31131

 

And another one https://fordforums.com.au/showthread.php?t=11442945 

 

The test results are only about 2 lbs-ft different from the set value. Close enough for government work.

 

If you are anal about getting the torque correct on a fastener, then you have to have the wrench calibrated about every two years, and it should be checked  against a known torque every time it is used. Apart from biennial calibrations, most torque wrenches in LAME shops don't get that check before each use. You have to remember that a torque wrench won't give you an exact result in practical situations. Each one comes with a notification of its expected variation from the value set.  If you have to buy a torque wrench, consider the reputation of the manufacturer, or google its reviews.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The SAAA seminar on engines at Narromine last year talked a little about torque wrenches and the two men who ran it stated that they had used Aldi torque wrenches and that they were accurate.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Google up this type of thing...

 

Kincrome Digital Torque Adaptor

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You will need one that goes down to 20 in.lb or less for most of your work (AN3 and AN4 bolts typically). A 1/4" drive torque wrench is ideal. For prop bolts I've got a 3/8" wrench that has a much higher range (can't recall what exactly). 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I normally don't shop for my precision tools at Aldi, however being a German company maybe they are quality.

 

Just so long as those chaps at Narromine don't buy their AN bolts from Bunnings

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You will need one that goes down to 20 in.lb or less for most of your work (AN3 and AN4 bolts typically). A 1/4" drive torque wrench is ideal. For prop bolts I've got a 3/8" wrench that has a much higher range (can't recall what exactly). 

I was about to say, first cab off the rank is to determine your range needed.

 

If you can get one to do all, then you've saved yourself some money.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I normally don't shop for my precision tools at Aldi, however being a German company maybe they are quality.

Just so long as those chaps at Narromine don't buy their AN bolts from Bunnings

 

Here is some information on suitable torque values for AN nuts - http://www.supercub.com/pdf/AN Bolt Torque.pdf

 

There are a few suppliers of certified aviation hardware who will sell you "one of these, two of those" so you don't end up with a heap of half-empty plastic bags of things when the job is done. These suppliers will also provide you with information to cover traceability requirements so that you know your plane is not held together with tapped wire from Wunhunglo Provence. 

 

For the amount of torquing you are going to do, it would be a waste of money buying a digital torque gauge. The idea of using a torque wrench is to ensure that all fasteners are equally tight, and that excessive force is not applied so that the fastener is weakened.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Snap on, you get what you pay for.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can't have one that will do the lot. For small stuff you need a dedicated  small wrench. If you are doing up tractor wheels you need something else A bit of "awareness"  or feel of what is reasonable  for a certain sized thread won't go astray either. Try doing it by feel and check with the wrench for practice at judging it  for awhile. Don't go over and overload the bolt. Some applications are tension to stretch "one time use" components. Hopefully they aren't in any planes we work on.  Nev

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for your input, however my question was what MAKE not how to use or which fasteners. Although you can always learn more.

 

Reggie recommends Snap On any other preferred makes ?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine are Norbar. Bought from a supplier in the UK (cheaper than here). The 1/4" version goes down to 10 in.lb

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer the older type with an adjustable ramp and a small thing that goes click when you reach the set tension .They are adjustable I have two of them (small and medium  (3/8 and 1/2 inch drive)   There may still be similar types made. I think they are DUFOR  or Repco.. Not made anymore. I've made small repairs to the bigger one. over time . It's easy to check calibration..  You might pick these up at swap days..Nev

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I prefer the older type with an adjustable ramp and a small thing that goes click when you reach the set tension .They are adjustable I have two of them (small and medium  (3/8 and 1/2 inch drive)   There may still be similar types made. I think they are DUFOR  or Repco.. Not made anymore. I've made small repairs to the bigger one. over time . It's easy to check calibration..  You might pick these up at swap days..Nev

Sill for sale Nev, “Deflecting Beam Torque Wrench”

 

not cheap but I like the simplicity and reliability of them. -  no compressed spring to loose tension over time

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought an Aldi one (good quality & price $30.00) and while it is great for wheel studs on the car it has no application on my aircraft engine as the lowest setting is about 28 foot pounds. I bought a 3/8 drive one for around $60.00 that has a range from 5 foot pounds to 80 foot pounds and that covers everything on a Jabiru 3300 engine. I also needed a 3/8 to 1/4 converter & long allen key hex socket for the cap screw head bolts. I have had both calibrated and they were both very accurate.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have two Warren and Brown deflecting beam, 1/2 and 1/4 do need to check you get correct adapters for sockets youre using, it, they are expensive too.

 

Bought a Kinchrome and it failed mid use, just didn't click anymore so doesn't say much about quality

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do deflecting beam require calibration as much as others?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Warren and Brown suggest if you look after it, it will give you years of accurate maintenance free service. I keep mine in the house at fairly constant temps and take good care of them, that makes a big difference to letting them float around in the tool box.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have two Warren and Brown deflecting beam, 1/2 and 1/4 do need to check you get correct adapters for sockets youre using, it, they are expensive too.

 

W & B deflecting beam, the best torque wrenches of them all, moderate price.

 

Do deflecting beam require calibration as much as others?

 

All torque wrenches need to be checked depending on how often you use them. I checked mine every 3 months or so, but then again it was being used every day in the higher 10s.

 

I don't like the sudden release torque wrenches, they jar my wrist. Smooth ramp and beam for me  ....'click!'

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can pay an enormous premium for a top quality torque wrench. If you are a mechanic assembling engines, transmissions etc on a daily basis you buy the best. Most home builders, back yard mechanics or average L1s use their torque wrench at standard regular maintenance intervals which is hardly at all. So long as those people purchase something that has a torque range capable of dealing with all of their requirements you do not have to spend very much. The cost of calibration is pretty much the same for a cheapie as it is for an expensive tool. Both of mine were quite cheap to buy and were surprisingly accurate when I had them calibrated. Even if the torque is out a little bit, at least the torque you set will be consistent on all the fasteners you are tightening. If you haven't used it for a while it pays to set it on the lowest setting and put a bolt in the vice and activate it a number of times. This will allow the lubricant inside the wrench to recoat the parts to ensure it operates consistently.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The tube type wrenches become inaccurate if you don't back off the adjustment to zero during storage.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have two Warren and Browns as well jetjr, you can't get any better, top quality.

I have two of these as well.

 

Do deflecting beam require calibration as much as others?

I have found them to remain in cal much longer than any of the "click and cam" types. I usually test them on the Norbar tester we have at work. Over the years I have used various types like strap-on, Norbar and Stahlwille, and when it comes to consistent accuracy, I reckon Warren and Brown 'deflection' torque wrenches are the most reliable.

 

I also have a cheap Chinese one I bought in 1985, when I put it on the tester, it is consistent, but the numbers on the wrench are nowhere near reality, so I have a piece of tape with "actual torque" figures stuck on it.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sill for sale Nev, “Deflecting Beam Torque Wrench”

not cheap but I like the simplicity and reliability of them. - no compressed spring to loose tension over time[/QUOTE]

 

As torque wrenches generally get infrequent use, it's always been a practice of mine to back off the adjustment to zero when iv'e finished using it.

 

This will ease the chance of the spring getting tired over time, thereby throwing out it's accuracy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later for your post to be seen If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...