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danny_galaga

Buying/selling a 19 registered aircraft

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It's not difficult. It's no more difficult than buying a 24 reg aircraft.

 

You need to have an idea of what you are looking at, or have someone that does. There are some awesome builds out there and I have seen some very average ones. You can't use it for flight training, but you can modify it. They have made the process more difficult, but it can still be done.

 

Try going for a fly with someone who has the same type to get an idea of actual performance.

 

 

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I thought you could train in a 19- so long as you did own it?

 

 

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Post 2 and 3 you are both right. 24- 25- and 55- registered aircraft (e.g. Factory built, fee-for-service maintained ... Have a look at the regs) are examples of aircraft that are commonly used for flight training where the person receiving training doesn't own the aircraft.

 

When flying a 19- registered aircraft, it's between the owner who is receiving the training and the instructor to decide that the aircraft is suitable for the instruction being undertaken. For example, is everyone ok if there is only one set of controls? Of course if you are the instructor and the plane ends up in a report, there is still a lot of paperwork.

 

I have many examples where it's come to this for a 19- aircraft so training does happen this way

 

 

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I thought you could train in a 19- so long as you did own it?

you have to build it to qualify for flight training and good luck finding a school that has insurance for flight training in experimental aircraft

 

 

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RAA I don't think has any distinction between builder and owner, not true for Experimental GA though.

 

Certainly know plenty who trained in 19 they bought. Theres plenty of factory assist builds which are 19 and are free of manufacturer LSA limitations too

 

 

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You can't "insist" an instructor fly it. or rightly feel aggrieved if they don't wish to.. It was always part of the 19 concept.. You get concessions and then want the same as compliant situations earn/ pay extra for. IF your "19" is a really great plane that is not really the issue. You have to cover the liabilities and the category will matter.. Nev

 

 

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yep. I've not trained in a 19-, but my instructor was willing provided it "wasn't a shitbox", and I have trained in a VH experimental that I own.

 

 

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Not really concerned about training side of things. More interested in the general resale market. Do people find it harder/easier to sell than a house for example? I see value drops fairly quickly- do planes tend to depreciate faster/slower than cars? For example some cars are virtually half purchase price in five years- great if you are buying, not so good if you are selling :-D

 

 

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My opinion is that when everyone has a good job, aircraft prices don't go down. When good jobs and flying hours take a hit like they did ~10 years ago, people are more keen to say goodbye to their toys. There is also a value second hand relative to the value of new replacment especially in the case of aircraft which explains why a 1977 Cessna 172 is holding its price quite well after the SIDS are done.

 

A 19- registered drifter or fisher koala with a new engine and new wing skins should be worth at least whatever those parts are worth retail plus a margin for the general condition of the rest of the aircraft. If the aircraft is common, easy to fly and easy to maintain it should be easy to sell. Ask FlyerMe!

 

As usual, a sale goes through at whatever price the buyer and seller negotiate. I suspect at least one Corby Starlet has changed hands for not much more than the outstanding rental fees on the hangar it was stored in

 

 

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IF the aircraft has been built well and finished well and maintained well most likely it will hold its value to way in excess of any vehicle or hole in the water to throw money into

 

 

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If you paid $110,000 each for an LSA and a Mercedes Benz in 2011 then today the plane is worth 85-90k and the car is worth 25k.

 

 

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That’s good to know. I’m actually looking at the selling just in case I’m broke a few years after I build my plane. :D

 

 

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Remember the variability of self build is so great if adversely affects the price.. It may not only be build quality but the general acceptance of the particular design you have chosen. Nev

 

 

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