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sandman

Rust spots on fly wires

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Current diesel is ultra-low sulphur diesel, containing a maximum of only 10 ppm sulphur, from 1st Jan 2009. The sulphur content of diesel was rapidly reduced in the first decade of this century, down from 500 ppm in the early 2000's.

 

Department of the Environment and Energy

 

Marine anti-rust treatments are best used, if you're flying in coastal conditions with high levels of salt spray and high humidity.

 

 

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There's a lot of Sulphur in crude oil. Pure sulphur is not corrosive . It's when its burned the problem occurs. The oxides are highly acidic when combined with water... Nev

 

 

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Coal when used to fire steel foundry's. made high carbon steel.

 

Oil on the other hand puts sulphur in, and soon rust's when exposed the elements.

 

Every one say's the old steel last's longer, New rusts quicker.

 

spacesaillor

 

 

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Years ago I bought a lot of old Indian NOS parts, They had been stored immersed in diesel, The majority of them were useless. An even coat of quite thick rust was on all of them and since they were precision items I did my money.

I'll wager the parts had gone rusty due to being exposed to air in an unprotected condition for a lengthy period, and then someone immersed the rusty parts in diesel to try and preserve them - or thinking, foolishly, that the diesel would remove the rust.

 

The problem is, there is water in all fuels. There is an allowable water content in new fuel from refineries. Water gathers in fuels by condensation in partly-full or near empty tanks.

 

The temperature drops, then moisture from humidity in the air, forms on the metal walls of the tank, and it runs down to the bottom of the tank. Not for nothing do all good tank setups have a sump and drain tap.

 

Underground tanks suffer less from water buildup due to a fairly constant temperature - but they get water in them via rainfall events and flooding, coupled with poor design of filler necks and vents.

 

All good machine operators know to fill fuel tanks at night time, at knockoff time, to prevent water buildup in tanks via condensation.

 

 

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You would probably lose your bet. I know the history of the parts and if just exposed, the rust would be more uneven. I don't think pure diesel would rust anything. It's the moisture and bacteria that does the damage.. I've heard of other instances of immersing in diesel that had the same disasterous results.

 

Spacey there's sulphur and other impurities in Coal as well as oil.

 

Earlier iron was made in a puddling furnace where the design of the furnace enabled the carbon to be oxidized out of the top surface. This was skimmed off the surface and forged into shapes. This was called "wrought iron " and is almost pure Fe. It welds easily under the hammer and resists corrosion but is quite soft. Carbon steel for swords etc was made from the wrought iron by applying carbon rich substances to the surface and folding back on itself as well as drawniing it out many times, while near melt temperature.. Very time consuming. and expensive.

 

Swedish steels were made using charcoal from wood and thereby achieved a name for quality steels. Alloy steel formulations are produced from predominantly electric furnaces today

 

The crude form of steel produced in large quantities was pig iron produced in blast furnaces from the iron ore , limestone and coal fired and poured into a standard mould . for convenience and transport. Menzies sold a lot to Japan, just prior to WW2 which they gave back to us as bombs etc so got the name "Pig iron Bob." as recognition. Nev

 

 

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Has anyone here used Surfboard Wax also known as Surfwax or any other type of Wax on their stainless wire cables and does anyone know if Wax on the cables will protect them in a salt air environment?... Franco.

 

 

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Don't know about surfboard wax being anti corrosive. Some wax preparations are though. something in a rattle can would be convenient. There are motor body anticorrosive waxes for the inside of sections but the are of a semi permanent nature. Nev

 

 

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Just spent a little time on line. Google anti corrosion products Aircraft in a marine environment. Some are certified by the aircraft makers Don't have waxes. Nev

 

 

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