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planedriver

Jabiru down at Wagga Wagga

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I question the relevance of the image number 2 in the report which is a Cessna.

 

 

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The Cessna image is from a completely different story - an emergency landing with a group of skydivers aboard. The level of journalism in this country reaches a new low every day, in relation to accuracy.

 

 

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I question the relevance of the image number 2 in the report which is a Cessna.

 

It is not a picture, but a link to a seperate video of a different incident. (They all are...)

 

 

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The relevance is, the news outlets are desperate for clicks, so they can sell advertising banners - instead of seeing all their advertising income go to internet giants such as Google ...

 

 

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good result. I've experienced smoke smell in the jab at about 300m, after TO, landed instantly. Turned out to be the muffler had fallen off.

There was another jab on short final when I wanted to land, and I've never been so relieved as when I told them to go around and they did.

Will be interested to find out the cause of this incident.

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I had an oil pressure reading drop (faulty sender) while joining long downwind.

Told the other aircraft that was turning base I wanted to come straight in for a downwind landing on the opposite runway as I had an engine issue.

They agreed, no problem. I think they could tell by the nervousness in my voice.

I ended up killing the engine and just gliding in to an uneventful stop and dragged it off down the taxiway....

I wasn't sure of the reason for the oil pressure drop at the time and was worried an oil line had come off or something and was worried about a fire.

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I had an oil pressure reading drop (faulty sender) while joining long downwind.

Told the other aircraft that was turning base I wanted to come straight in for a downwind landing on the opposite runway as I had an engine issue.

They agreed, no problem. I think they could tell by the nervousness in my voice.

I ended up killing the engine and just gliding in to an uneventful stop and dragged it off down the taxiway....

I wasn't sure of the reason for the oil pressure drop at the time and was worried an oil line had come off or something and was worried about a fire.

If you call a Mayday you automatically get preference over everything else.

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Yes, maybe if they had refused. I just asked politely and they agreed. It was my first reaction...maybe instinct/airmanship.

Being pretty much within gliding distance the whole time, I was nervous but in control and confident in landing.

The engine ran fine right up until I killed it....

I've never though about calling a mayday, even afterwards, until you just mentioned it.

Something to think about.....

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At small country strips there's not too much of a problem, but at busier strips you have to get the attention of all on the radio, there may not be much time, and if the forst three words grab attention, everyone will be jerked to an alert state at least.

 

This one shows the congested radio of the city strips I keep talking about, and the results of drilling radio phrases allowing orderly communication between those involved.

 

In this one the pilot may already have called a Mayday, but it does show how hard it is to try to save yourself and give someone a running commentary at the same time.

Despite the comments below the video about runway alignment, from my memory the pilot had just pulled off a steep turn to get between two buildings below roof level and really had no option but dump it.

It also show the scrength of GA nosewheel suspensions

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Sorry, the first link ran on to another event, will try to find the original

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[TABLE]

[TR]

[TD]19/4/2019[/TD]

[TD]Forest Hill Aerodrome[/TD]

[TD]NSW[/TD]

[TD]Jabiru[/TD]

[TD]J120C[/TD]

[TD]Jabiru[/TD]

[TD]2200B[/TD]

[TD]After take-off at 700ft AGL a left turn was initiated. Immediately, there was a toxic smell and smo... [/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]After take-off at 700ft AGL a left turn was initiated. Immediately, there was a toxic smell and smoke in the cockpit. At this moment, with the aircraft needing to dump about 800feet of height NOW!!, The throttle was cut, the turn was pulled tight, full 'top rudder' was applied and the fuel shut-off valve was closed. A diving full slip was carried out, toward the general direction of the departure RWY strip. This was performed at a speed well above normal approach speed, in an attempt to land as quickly as possible. At or before the half way point of the approach, it became difficult to breathe and see due to smoke and flames. The aircraft was rounded out and forced onto the ground at high speed. After heavy braking, the aircraft came to rest on the centre line, facing 320 degrees, at right angles to the RWY direction, about half way along the RWY.The pilot and PAX disembarked the aircraft via the port door. The aircraft was destroyed by the fire.

 

Very well done by the pilot and a good report of what happened. You can tell it was written by the pilot and not some office person with little knowledge of aviation. [/TD]

[TD][/TD]

 

[TD][/TD]

 

[TD][/TD]

 

[TD][/TD]

 

[TD][/TD]

 

[TD][/TD]

 

[TD][/TD]

[/TR]

[/TABLE]

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Fire situation needs speed to get it the ground as a priority. In My view it's about the worst situation a plane can get into. No use for a Chute and you mustn't roll it into a ball because it's a fiery ball and you must exit quickly, not be injured or unable to open a door. Nev

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This should have been the top video of #12, example of radio during forced landing at Bankstown:

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I think your best bet is to try and track down the owner. If it was Wagga based that shouldn't be too hard.

From an investigation point of view it's aircraft on fire, successful forced landing, occupants OK, so I wouldn't expect a forensic examination, although it's amazing what you can still see after a completely engulfing fire; the wiring is usually all there.

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I have to say i'm not 100% happy with the fuel line installation on the 230.Hose and clamps,4 of them in the engine compartment,

hard to completely cover them with Red ? Would unions be a safer setup? and maybe stainless braiding.

Colin

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Downunder, the oil pressure sender in the Jabiru is screwed directly to the engine block. This minimises the number of connections and hoses, but it does expose the sender to more vibration than if the sender were on the end of a hose.

For me, I prefer the way it is now to putting in a more complex setup. But the downside is that the sender sure can fail.

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Blast, 230's OPS has gone now,full needle deflection so cancelled late afternoon local flight.Next morning was able to reach thru and tap 

sender unit with a spanner and it returned to normal so went for a fly,gauge showing normal 3.5 bar. New sender ordered.These VDO's appear fragile,Tacho hours go on the blink

quickly into a flight,Flip flop Microair won't monitor 2 channels now. Always something😘

colin

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Mine did the same a while ago.The gauge just went off the scale during a runup. 

 

It returned to normal next time I started the engine & I went for a fly. Just on takeoff it went full scale & returned to normal at the top of the climb & for the rest of the flight and went off the scale again taxying in. A friend had a new one & gave it to me.

Problem solved. The gauge now shows pressure of 350 kPA at cruise rpm. The old one was never above 300 so I reckon it was a bit crook from the start. Don't get me started on VHF radios.

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