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fly_tornado

CASA set to crack down on spin training

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Turbo, I have no control of how you choose to interpret my post. It's pretty clear what I'm trying to say. Nev

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Nev is so obviously right about training that it shouldn't be necessary to state it. Alas, there is a bureaucratic tendency to ban things foolishly, and we are seeing a prime example of that.

At Gawler, the gliding club there has been doing spin training for about 60 years with no problems, mind you the instructors have themselves been well trained.

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Alas, there is a bureaucratic tendency to ban things foolishly, and we are seeing a prime example of that.
What we are seeing now is CASA correctly stating not to do spins in types which are not appropriate. Per CASA's statement yesterday we will soon see more guidance on what is required per Part 61 training - you will see that it is much more than what was in the old Day VFR Syllabus.
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Just curious why this thread is in this Forum. 'Trips, events, seats' doesn't seem the best place for this?

i meant to put this video in the gov folder but missed

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Damned if you do and damned if you don’t. No RAA plane is approved for spins and sounds like CASA interpret this as incipient spins too. Seems reasonable., an incipient spin might develop further unintentionally

Two scenarios:

1. Stall with an uncommanded wing drop. This is what normal category airplanes may undertake safely. Certification flight testing for recovery from a one turn spin provides for a pilot to not get it quite right with perhaps a delay in the correct stall recovery actions. If it is progressing towards a spin then immediately use the spin recovery procedure in the flight manual. LSA spin test requirements are less stringent than FAR 23 normal category. NASA has done extensive spin testing on a few GA types and shown that one of these is unrecoverable after a couple more turns. Refer FAA ACs.

2. Intentionally doing an incipient spin is intentionally entering a spin. An airplane approved for intentional spins is required to safely undertake this.

 

There will be more on this subject from the ATSB.

 

CASA requires incipient spin training for an RPL per the new Part 61 and we are still waiting for the guidance material. It has taken a long awaited ATSB report for CASA to even start thinking about what they want instructors to teach and how to do it safely.

 

Flight schools who require high-vis vests ..... my response is they are perhaps a good idea while walking across the road to the airplane (all pedestrians should wear them or carry a red flag around areas busy with cars) but then consider if a parachute is going to be more useful while flying.

 

Reading Chapter 4 of the FAA’s Airplane Flying Handbook is well worthwhile - free online at Airplane Flying Handbook

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That video clip seems to be merely pointing out that the aircraft involved is not rated for intentional spins. Says nothing about prohibiting spin training in aircraft approved for spin training?

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