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Self evacuated eh? I'll bet they did......

 

:wasnt me:

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Posted (edited)

Army helicopter makes emergency landing after 'wire strike'

 

alt=A Tiger helicopter made an emergencyhttps://media.apnarm.net.au/media/images/2019/06/11/helictoper-ukldvb5mm4kknozbgs2_fct857x481x17.0x136.0_ct834x465.JPG[/img]

A Tiger helicopter made an emergency landing in a paddock near Maclagan about 11.45am Tuesday. WIN News Toowoomba

 

 

 

THE Department of Defence is looking into an emergency landing of an Australian Army helicopter during a routine training exercise on the Darling Downs today.

 

The Tiger helicopter made a safe landing in a paddock near Maclagan about 11.45am.

 

A Defence spokeswoman confirmed the incident to The Chronicle, and said the aircraft experienced a "wire strike" during routine training.

 

"The aircraft landed safely and all members of the crew are safe," the spokeswoman said.

 

"Defence is currently looking into further details of the incident."

Edited by Guest

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And in other news.....a popular law firm followed the emergency vehicles and has assisted Farmer Dave of Maclagan in launching legal proceedings against the ADF for the mental anguish suffered because his beer was no longer ice cold after the power was interupted.

:amazon:

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Here was me thinking it was a Tiger Moth.

Does anybody know the story of why there were so many fatalities during wartime basic training in Tiger Moths? I have read, but find it hard to believe, that the Port Pirie wartime basic training operation killed 5% of recruits.

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I suspect it might be related to the fact that they use trees and such for cover and camouflage to train in a realistic fashion. It's obvious that he was too high. If he was low enough, he wouldn't have hit the wire.

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Posted (edited)
Does anybody know the story of why there were so many fatalities during wartime basic training in Tiger Moths? I have read, but find it hard to believe, that the Port Pirie wartime basic training operation killed 5% of recruits.

 

Probably due to the need to push students through the course. In wartime you don't have the luxury of a slow and steady development of recruits. There would have been many reasons like a sky full of aircraft whose pilots were at different skill levels. Weather and equipment failures would have taken their toll. Every wartime air force had high training fatality rates. Then after the pilots were "qualified" they killed themselves and crew during mission training.

 

It was common, too, for mid-air collisions to occur while those huge bomber formations were forming up after take off.

 

So the Yanks had things like this:

 

main-qimg-9744a9925ff8b5aa77bedb968edd7a09

…or this:

 

1560248161195.png.1bb0dbad28d41f3c7aa43f831df837c2.png

…or any of a hundred and one other wacky paint jobs.

 

These are genuine colour schemes used by what were called ‘assembly ships’ (also sometimes known, cynically, as ‘judas goats’)

 

The assembly ships were worn out bombers, brightly painted with unit-specific high-visibility patterns, and equipped with signal lighting, and flares, who would take off before the rest of the formation and act as a point of reference for the rest of the bombers to formate on, forming what they called a Combat box.

 

Once the bomber force was in formation, the assembly ships went back to base.

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Posted (edited)

do we know why was a Tiger flying that low?

The local pc-9's often fly around at 200 ft or so....especially down the coast.

I asked a military instructor once why that was.

He said any "civillian" aircraft shouldn't be below 500, so it was actually safer for them at that height....

Edited by Guest

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but they must know where the wires are, our Tiger pilot must have gotten a bit lost.

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The training area out there is roughly a 20nm radius to the north of Oakey. A lot of it is rugged terrain. I don't think the exact location of every wire would be etched into a trainee's mind. There are heaps of landing pads scattered around. It's not like knowing where the clothesline is in you 700sq m back yard.

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The local pc-9's often fly around at 200 ft or so....especially down the coast.

I asked a military instructor once why that was.

He said any "civillian" aircraft shouldn't be below 500, so it was actually safer for them at that height....

Except Ag aircraft, survey machines, firebombers and the odd drone :oh yeah:

I've seen Mirages, Skyhawks, Hunters, F111's, and Hornets flying through at AG operating height. They were pretty switched on especially the F111's, very regular vistors 2 or 3 times a week and often a trailing pair.

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do we know why was a Tiger flying that low?

Because he could and now he will have a desk job

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Posted (edited)
And in other news.....a popular law firm followed the emergency vehicles and has assisted Farmer Dave of Maclagan in launching legal proceedings against the ADF for the mental anguish suffered because his beer was no longer ice cold after the power was interupted.

M16A1 - I trust someone reminds Farmer Dave, he can also add, "nervous and pyschological trauma to stock (namely, sheep), and extensive agricultural losses leading from same", to the action.

There there's obviously the, "pasture damage created by the unauthorised landing", which will need to be measured and assessed by a fully qualified person. This will no doubt impact seriously on milk production for the foreseeable future.

Let alone the added nervous shock to Farmer Dave, caused by trespass of a large number of unauthorised military personnel, leading him to believe a North Korean invasion was under way, and forcing him to take shelter in his nuclear bunker.

Of course, the lawyers will have to spend much more time (measured in 15 minute charge time sections), assessing the full impact of the intrusion, which shattered the peaceful calm of Mossy Hollow, and which possibly also has severe quarantine implications, leading to further calculations of more extensive agricultural losses.

Edited by Guest

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M16A1 - I trust someone reminds Farmer Dave, he can also add, "nervous and pyschological trauma to stock (namely, sheep), and extensive agricultural losses leading from same", to the action.

There there's obviously the, "pasture damage created by the unauthorised landing", which will need to be measured and assessed by a fully qualified person. This will no doubt impact seriously on milk production for the foreseeable future.

Let alone the added nervous shock to Farmer Dave, caused by trespass of a large number of unauthorised military personnel, leading him to believe a North Korean invasion was under way, and forcing him to take shelter in his nuclear bunker.

Of course, the lawyers will have to spend much more time (measured in 15 minute charge time sections), assessing the full impact of the intrusion, which shattered the peaceful calm of Mossy Hollow, and which possibly also has severe quarantine implications, leading to further calculations of more extensive agricultural losses.

Unfortunately, due to drought there were no crops or livestock, but I’m sure they will look for trace levels of contaminants that might impact future agriculture.

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Don't forget the cost of treatment for PTSD for the crew members who not only had to suffer the psychological stresses of the actual emergency up to the time of landing, but also the stresses of the post-incident military enquiry.

 

Are the crew of a military aircraft court-martialled for losing their aircraft like the captain of a naval vessel is?

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They will get medals because they managed to get it down without tipping it over and destroying more gear. If I was the base commander at Oakey I would map out all the obstacles around the base before letting the boys cut loose with the toys

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Are the crew of a military aircraft court-martialled for losing their aircraft like the captain of a naval vessel is?

Shhhh! There are always well-known legal actors searching for more ways to boost their turnover and profits. Don't give them ideas! The very thought of hitting an uncharted rock in the sky, makes them rub their hands!

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And in other news.....a popular law firm followed the emergency vehicles and has assisted Farmer Dave of Maclagan in launching legal proceedings against the ADF for the mental anguish suffered because his beer was no longer ice cold after the power was interupted.

:amazon:

That case was dissmissed when the judge said "Anyone who suffers mental anguish because his beer isn't cold deserves to be certified.

On the other hand if the loss or power killed 250,000 chickens in the nearby broiler shed the ADF would be out of pocket.

The best air show I've ever been to was at East Sale, well out into country Victoria and away from the hierarchy. we were allowed much closer to the runway than at Avalon, so the vision was great, and a sequence of fighters started, each one coming in low from the east, pulling up into a loop and departing to the west all were pretty much the same to watch. The Mustang climbed higher than the older aircraft it followed, a vampire flew higher than the Mustang and so on until the FA18 which went vertical until it became a speck and then came down and departed. It came in again and did the same thing followed by some lower moves, then it disappeared. The sequence was too short so I started scanning each end of the runway expecting something else. The crowd had turned their backs and were happily chatting along with my wife and kids. Finally I saw a little speck in the distance right down on the deck I warned my wife, but she hadn't turned when it went past with a sound like an acetylene torch backfiring multiple times but at about 10 times the noise factor. The kids screamed, my wife started crying, and most of the other women were the same along the strip. For me it was the best display I'd ever seen, because all the others had been sub sonic and a bit of a let down. When the pilot flew off the end of the strip he went over a market garden, breaking all the hot house glass. The ADF replaced the glass, and announced they would not be doing that sort of display again.

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The biggest risk flying low along a beach is fishing rods being thrown at you, and the salt spray is no good for the plane. Nev

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That case was dissmissed when the judge said "Anyone who suffers mental anguish because his beer isn't cold deserves to be certified.

After some of the cases you’ve posted, it’s quite plausible that a case got traction because it wasn’t his fault and the ADF is seen to have deep pockets. An out of court settlement could be on the cards though.

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I would have thought that not knowing where all the wires are would be part of training for operations overseas. No sense making training absolutely risk free and then expecting safe operations in a third world country, although there ought to be less wires there.

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Posted (edited)

I believe the Army pilot who had a wire strike in a Pilatus Porter in 1980, near Oakey also ejected from a Macchi in the same year. That is to say he moved from one service to another between incidents. If I remember correctly he will be retiring from QANTAS in the next few years. Yes as a captain. As far as a wire strike being a limitation on career progression, apparently it isn't. I also think this isn't the first tiger wire strike near Oakey and it won't be the last.

 

I submit that after due process is followed the decision to return to flight will be in the hands of the aircrew, not those whose job it is to judge them. In my opinion if the aircrew were that bad they never would have made it to the flight line

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