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cooperplace

Aircraft in forced landing, Moorabbin

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I can always remember one adviser stating that golf courses are the worst place to pick for an emergency landing, despite their inviting appearance - because they are full of sand traps, hollows and humps, and rarely offer a long smooth area for landing, unless you're dead lucky enough to find a long, smooth driving range.

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Another Jabiru airframe put to the test by the looks of it.

Well done Jab you built a great airframe, shame about the propulsion system, wish it was as robust.

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Might be a bit early to blame the propulsion system; we know nothing about the cause of this prang. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

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Well unfortunately they are not gliders and just float around on thermals.

Pretty sure it said they took off from Moorabbin under their own steam.

Guess they could have forgotten to get fuel, then again they might have been going to play golf and arrive in style but duffed the landing.

Yep your right Coop’s I can’t really correct you if your wrong as I’m only surmising, guess we will have to wait and see in the RAA incident database when they update it.

(All said with tongue in cheek)

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Capital Golf Course is at the end of 35, so it could have been an EFATO from 35 or a touch and go gone wrong

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You won't always get a perfect spot so practice doing a curved flare and touchdown.. Get an instructor first unless you have lots of hours up doing similar things. He might think you are mad BUT.... Nev

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Another Jabiru airframe put to the test by the looks of it.

Well done Jab you built a great airframe, shame about the propulsion system, wish it was as robust.

 

I wish some more pilots knew how to use the propulsion system properly ! Which I happen to use and like !

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I wish some more pilots knew how to use the propulsion system properly ! Which I happen to use and like !

I’m hearing you Camel

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[TABLE]

[TR]

[TD]15/6/2019[/TD]

[TD]Moorabbin Airport[/TD]

[TD]VIC[/TD]

[TD]Jabiru[/TD]

[TD]J160C[/TD]

[TD]Jabiru[/TD]

[TD]22B333[/TD]

[TD]The aircraft experienced a partial loss of engine power and vibration at 300ft after take-off and wa... [/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]The aircraft experienced a partial loss of engine power and vibration at 300ft after take-off and was unable to maintain altitude. The pilot conducted a forced landing into the golf course north of the upwind end of the RWY.[/TD]

[TD][/TD]

 

[TD][/TD]

 

[TD][/TD]

 

[TD][/TD]

 

[TD][/TD]

 

[TD][/TD]

 

[TD][/TD]

[/TR]

[/TABLE]

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Ice, blocked filter, water in fuel, stubby lid jammed in throttle lever, could be many things more likely than mechanical failure

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So what was the cause TP?

Edited by Guest

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So what was the cause TP?

 

I think we could rule out carb ice

This is from the Lycoming operators hand book, same principle would apply.

 

 

(2) Take-Off – Take-offs and full throttle operation should be made with carburetor heat in full cold

position. The possibility of throttle icing at wide throttle openings is very remote, so remote in

fact, that it can be disregarded.

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Broken piston return springs (and low on blinker fluid).

(I own and operate a Jabiru engine. My piston return springs are A1.)

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I can always remember one adviser stating that golf courses are the worst place to pick for an emergency landing, despite their inviting appearance - because they are full of sand traps, hollows and humps, and rarely offer a long smooth area for landing, unless you're dead lucky enough to find a long, smooth driving range.

 

I had an engine failure on take off from Husbands Bosworth, in Leicestershire in the 1980s. . .we had just uploaded some fuel, but Had NOT mixed it with the 2 stroke oil properly ( evidently ). . the engine coughed and died at around 150 feet, leaving me no option but the Golf Course which adjoined the airfield.

 

I landed on a fairway, which was, luckily, straight ahead. . and there was no drama at all. I noticed, as we rolled out, that a golfer had stood and watched us pass by,. . and then calmly played his shot as though nothing untoward had just happened. . . .

 

I found lots of raw oil in the carb, and after a flush out, we were able to continue our voyage. . . The Green keeper told us that if we had run over a Green, and WORSE 'Rutted' It that we would have been assassinated . . . .

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I think we could rule out carb ice

This is from the Lycoming operators hand book, same principle would apply.

 

Not sure of the relevance, it wasnt a Lyco? Different carb, even in different location?

Jabs common to get ice on taxi and idling in winter inland, rough running on take off would require quick thinking if you werent expecting ice.

Pre take off check is apply carb heat, note rpm change

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The Lycoming usually has the intake passages passing through the sump casting so is a bit different from most engines in that respect. Effective carb heat needs quite a bit of engine power and FULL application for an appropriate period. "Unlikely" is not a guarantee of "won't". and idle power is not much power. A bit more consideration of what is enough to check it relating to conditions might be warranted. A rev drop might indicate the linkage is working but not be enough to de ice anything if it's present. . A full power check on the brakes before commencing take off roll gives you more time to check your power is ALL there. Nev

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I had an engine failure on take off from Husbands Bosworth,

. The Green keeper told us that if we had run over a Green, and WORSE 'Rutted' It that we would have been assassinated . . . .

gotta love those English village names....... sounds like yours was a near-death experience

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