Jump to content
  • Welcome to Recreational Flying!
    A compelling community experience for all aviators
    Intuitive, Social, Engaging...Registration is FREE.
    Register Log in

Recommended Posts

A Collings foundation B17G crashed during a joy flight. The B17 had number 4 engine troubles after takeoff but made it back to the airport and crashed just after touching down. There was 10 plus 3 crew. The crew were highly experienced with the B17. Big shame nevertheless... 😞

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Flightaware shows the aircraft in an increasingly tight turn towards the dead engine, why why why

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I would have thought 3 engines on a relatively light airframe (no bomb load, etc) would not have been too difficult to handle? 

They seem to have a large rudder.

Edited by Downunder
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Original reports claimed 5 dead. Later reports now say 7 dead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Downunder said:

I would have thought 3 engines on a relatively light airframe (no bomb load, etc) would not have been too difficult to handle? 

They seem to have a large rudder.

Yeah but with so little information at the moment, ANY speculation is probably pointless.  Statements from NON- Flying witnesses some distance away are not much value, although the press always like to print them. . . 

 

Very sad event indeed. . .thoughts are with the families of those deceased.

Edited by Phil Perry
typo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 If the engine could not be feathered you would have problems.  Mechanical issues can't be ruled out. It's a complex old plane and don't just assume they mucked up the flying, as is generally the case. Nev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People often forget that these warbirds were designed to last, at best, a few month of combat.

Eighty years later a few them are still being flown.

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Just to correct the ambiguity in my post above it's the "assumption" of the crew mucking things up, that I assert is generally the case.. It's just great that these old plane are active again but think oif the issued when there's no factory back up with parts or expertise and what you are building it up from is a total  wreck in most cases, though it might still look like THE plane superficially, EVERYTHING, (every bit) has to be inspected or remanufactured or made from new. Nev

Edited by facthunter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, Old Koreelah said:

People often forget that these warbirds were designed to last, at best, a few month of combat.

Eighty years later a few them are still being flown.

...and to clarify my post: it's an incredible feat of restoration to get these warbirds into the air again, but among the thousands of components might be one with hidden faults related to age.

The Mitsubishi Zero was largely built from a light and strong alloy recently developed by Sumitomo.

Decades later it was found to be prone to inter-cellular corrosion. I'm surprised any of them are still flying.

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's an "as crashed" one at Darwin Museum The workmanship is unequalled . The alloy probably had a lot of magnesium in it. They were a quite small aircraft.  Nev

  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oshkosh 2018, B29 and two (I think it was two?) B17's doing laps of the campground at about 500 feet on Friday evening. Cooooooool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The NTSB has held an information briefing for the media and did quite a good job of providing as much useful information as is available at this early stage, whilst diplomatically fielding the normal dumb questions from the assembled media.

 

https://www.wfsb.com/news-conference-ntsb-gives-update-on-investigation-into-b-/video_ba0e6c8e-67c3-5cb0-a918-9c07e26d0643.html

 

Interesting points revealed from media reports, and the NTSB interview were:

 

1. The Pilot and Co pilot are amongst the deceased.

2. The Pilot had 7300 hours on the B-17 and was the highest hour B-17 pilot in the U.S.

3. The aircraft was certified for 87 octane fuel and NTSB initial tests on remaining fuel indicated it had been fuelled with 100 octane LL fuel.

4. The aircraft initially struck landing lights attached to breakaway poles around 1000 feet out from the runway threshold.

5. The aircraft showed signs of being slightly right wing down at that point.

6. The pilot reported "engine problem" to ATC, and investigations are continuing to try and determine if more than one engine wasn't producing power (or full power).

7. There have been 21 crash incidents involving WW2 aircraft since 1982, the date when the NTSB started to collate records involving WW2 aircraft crashes. Of those 21 incidents, 3 involved B-17's.

8. There does not appear, at this stage, to be any single factor that is a standout repeat factor in those WW2 aircraft crashes.

 

No doubt the NTSB will be looking at whether the aircrafts impact with the landing lights affected its controllability from that point on.

  • Informative 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They have done fuel testing and it all checks out there. The B17 can remain in the pattern with three engines and continue flight operations I can only speculate losing more then one engine would be quite difficult. It looks like now they are turning there attention to the radio conversations with the ground and aircraft and weather the engine was on fire going by what was said during radio calls.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes a plane like this can fly well on 3 engines once it's cleaned up and trimmed out. Being cleaned up means the dud engine (if there was one) is feathered successfully, Flaps up, wheels up and the cowl gills etc closed. IF an engine can't be feathered due  some condition in the feathering system or the prop has fined off and really creating drag all bets are off regarding ability to continue flying.. Most of these Big round engines have fire extinguishing systems that are reasonably effective. One would have though there would be some "filming" of the plane in flight, but perhaps not. Sad outcome for all affected and it ended up some distance from the runway and hitting something heavy and solid quite hard. Nev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later for your post to be seen If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...