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Showing content with the highest reputation on 18/11/18 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    We need to again thank you and your team
  2. 1 point
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-11-17/man-who-worked-75-years-as-an-aircraft-engineer-turns-95/10501728
  3. 1 point
    Now that we have confirmed the site name to be Recreational Flying (there is always a means to my madness) Ahmed has created a new site header logo of the name. I really like it so here is a sneak preview of it: Click to see larger
  4. 1 point
    Not sure if I’m posting in the right section or not. Seems to me you only have maybe 15 minutes to go back and edit a post! Trying to do a kit build thread right now and it sure would be helpful to be able to edit posts to make the thread more streamlined and informative.
  5. 1 point
    Not necessarily....If I read correctly, the automated system applies a pitch down if if detects excessive AoA. If the AoA indication is erroneous, then you have problems. Apparently this can be turned off if this is recognized, but if it happens on take off, I imagine it's a busy time to be troubleshooting.
  6. 1 point
    Had a chance to do a bit on the plane this weekend, so got stuck into mounting the rudder pedals and bolted the horizontal tail on for the first time.
  7. 1 point
    You may like to start a thread in the forum Aircraft Building and Design however soon we will turn the Blogs on in the site which will be a great way to create a Build Blog and you can edit your Blog all the time
  8. 1 point
    We have a 912 80 hp and to be honest it is terrific, couldn't go back to the 582. however the cost is huge, not only the engine but getting it certified to fly. If you have lots of cash to spare go for it.
  9. 1 point
    I have to concur with Jetjr here. (Of course I am assuming you are referring to the typical AF ratio sensor system where it selectively samples gas from one site only. As has been stated here and on many sites and threads on this forum - the major problem with Jabiru engines is that there is not uniform mixing in the after carby plenum chamber. This then means that depending on the amount of mixing that has occurred gas that is aspirated by the individual cylinders can vary dramatically. This is actually similar on many engines, its just that the massive heatsinks of Lycs and continentals can cope happily with some cylinders running lean. Jabs are a fine light engine and the cause of many problems is they can't tolerate the same as the heavy old ones. There are a bunch of reasons why they run uneven: Typically the richest (laden with the heaviest droplets of fuel) air has the highest inertia and is carried forward to the front cylinders. The air on the sides of the column of flow through the throat of the carby tends to be the leanest and this air is the least dense and has least inertia and is preferentially directed toward the rear cylinder intakes. There's a further complicating factor - The direction of air rotation in the carby intake SCAT hose. Typically it rotates in a clockwise direction and as it passes through the carby picks up the fuel (in an uneven concentration) as as it passes out the carby tends to throw the densest fuel laden air to the right. Then there's a further complication: In the intake plenum chamber there's an airfoil shaped post in front of the carby outlet. The role of that is to try to stop the swirl of air - but it also can produce complex coanda effects (gas flow sticking to the surface and then leaving at a more pronounced angle in the original direction) which may over-enhance the negative effect in some situations. Without getting into what can be done to ameliorate these - The point is that all these things serve to either improve or mess up the mixing depending on lots of factors. Often they impede mixing. The lack of mixing is what finally ends up with significant variation of ratios at each cylinder. So a Fuel Air ratio gauge is not going to tell you which cylinders are rich and which are lean unless you have one at each and every inlet because as JetJR said an average tells you nothing about the individuals cylinders.
  10. 1 point
    Can you add "country" to the avatar please. So I know when responding if they are USA or Australia etc. Particularly useful if they are talking regulations or prices. The old system had a flag or location text. Sue
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