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Showing content with the highest reputation on 23/01/19 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    One of the last Dambuster squadron members Died in December 2018, His Wife also passed away ten days later. The couple had no known family so it might have been a very quiet funeral, had it not been for the Media Officer at RAF Cosford, who picked up on this and immediately alerted as many people as possible about the situation via local and social media. One of Our pilots at Otheton noticed this and alerted me with a screenshot of this Twitter Post. With only one and a half days to go, I called a friend in Oxfordshire about this and he said he would be there. . there was no time to expect other local flyers to attend, being a working day. https://www.shropshirestar.com/news/local-hubs/telford/2019/01/22/hundreds-at-funeral-of-telford-dambusters-raf-couple-who-died-10-days-apart/ The crowd was amazing. . over three hundred people were there, and My mate and I supplied / served hot bacon rolls and tea afterwards for the flag bearers, the pall bearers and anyone else who fancied a bit of snap. . .out of the car boot. My Mate Clark thought of this, as, since the people had no relatives, there would be no wake as such. . and the crematorium is on a hilltop ad it was bloody freezing in that wind. . .He's a Good Man, ex Marine (UK) It's a shame that Edna and Victor were unable to see it all. . . the RAF Bugler with his last post was very moving. . .
  2. 2 points
    That statement dates you a bit Nev, haven't had primary's since we started using alphabet airspace. Must admit I still refer to them as primary's, remember the days when you could walk down to the briefing office to get weather and have a yarn at places like Bankstown and Moorabin?
  3. 1 point
    F-111D Cockpit Crew Module USAF serial 68-0125. Completely restored to perfection. This is the only restored F-111D cockpit in existence and is truly exotic. The cockpit has all real flight instruments. 100% complete. Cockpit is currently owned by a former F-111 pilot. Send us a message with questions... Delivered to the USAF on 18 September 1972. Whilst with the 524th TFS, 27th TFW, crashed at 14:15 hours MST, on September 11, 1987 at Cannon AFB, New Mexico The jet impacted about one-and-three-quarter miles from the end of runway 22 at Cannon AFB. The crew were practicing single engine approaches and the engine that was providing thrust flamed out. A well known fact about the F-111 is that the engines don't have very good response to rapid throttle movements. The aircraft wallowed around for several seconds before the capsule separated. The ejection was initiated at about 200 feet and the parachute barely opened before impact. The airframe impacted on the right wing and cartwheeled several times before coming to a rest upside down. The vertical tail broke off in the ground. Crew ejected safely: PILOT Maj John Sides and WSO Maj. Russell Striker. Call sign Captor 11. The aircraft had accumilated 1,444 flights and 3,494.2 flight hours at the time of loss. USA SALE ONLY TO A US CITIZEN ONLY https://www.ebay.com/itm/F-111-Aardvark-Cockpit-Crew-Module/254054932151?hash=item3b26da9eb7:g:fToAAOSwmPlcMTeS
  4. 1 point
    An amazing story, amazing group of aviators and technicians who pulled off the impossible, and the incredible Barnes Wallis who only had a slide rule to come up with the method.
  5. 1 point
    There have been a number of Tigers suffer engine failures as the result of the prorective coating on the cork float in the carburettor cracking. The crack allows fuel to enter the cork, as the engine warms it causes the coating to expand and can make the float stick and lead to a rich or lean situation. Very hard to identify if the aircraft has caught fire. There is a well documented accident in Qld explaining this fault, It would be very easy to attribute this type of failure to carb ice. ATSB report.
  6. 1 point
    A wonderful send of for a wonderful couple . Thank you Phil for being there . R.I.P Victor and Edna Dave
  7. 1 point
    There have been a number of Tigers suffer engine failures as the result of the prorective coating on the cork float in the carburettor cracking. The crack allows fuel to enter the cork, as the engine warms it causes the coating to expand and can make the float stick and lead to a rich or lean situation. Very hard to identify if the aircraft has caught fire. There is a well documented accident in WA explaining this fault, I’ll try to find the report. It would be very easy to attribute this type of failure to carb ice. The WA accident report says it is a know fault observed by people performing overhauls, yet no AD issued. I will not fly Tigers any longer as a result, the last endorsement I knocked back had an unexplained engine failure on takeoff resulting in an off field landing and damage.
  8. 1 point
    This is actually a very poor video for the following reasons: - he introduces the PARE spin recovery technique before commencing the demos, but never mentions the A (aileron) during any of the recoveries. If you enter a spin and not centre the ailerons you will likely not recover (aircraft type dependent). - he continually refers to airspeed being the primary factor in stalling - it’s angle of attack, you can stall / spin from any airspeed. - he introduces a non standard method of using roll to identify which rudder to apply during spin recovery. This will kill you if you try this method with inverted spinning. The only way to reliably identify the direction of rotation is yaw, best way is to sight down the nose of the aircraft. I agree that looking at the balance ball is unrealistic unless in IMC. - he never mentions removing the opposite rudder when the spin rotation stops. Leaving full rudder in will cause some aircraft to spin in the opposite direction, some will flick into an inverted spin if you also hold the forward stick in too. The Yak 52 being a great example. If you’re going to produce a training video on a topic it must be done correctly. In this case give the full recovery method and apply all steps through to established back in the climb. It is very difficult to retrain people who have been taught incorrect techniques, teach the correct ones from the outset. In summary; - it’s angle of attack not airspeed leading to stall / spins. - Use all steps of an acceptable procedure every time, especially when instructing. - don’t try to make up your own recovery tips without thinking them through and doing some research. (Using roll to identify which rudder to use) On the positive side, I agree with his scenario based entry method by simulating an overshoot onto final.
  9. 1 point
    Certainly was in June 6 of us in 3 planes flew in there early from Coober Pedy and we had a tour of the atomic test sites and then we went to Nullabor overnight i have photos of the trip on the Deniliquin Aero Club website on the Fly-Aways page https://www.deniliquinaeroclub.com/fly-aways.html Maralinga was an interesting place cheers bruce
  10. 1 point
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