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Showing content with the highest reputation on 17/06/19 in all areas

  1. 21 points
    Facthunter (Nev) is not on line at the moment, as a believe he may have ducked down to the bottle shop to get something to celebrate with? If he gets back before drinking the contents, he should tick over the 20,000 post's mark this evening, which currently stands at 19,995. What an achievment! and may it continue for many moons to come.. I for one, would like to pass on my sincere thanks to you Nev for all the knowledgable tips and wise contributions that you've posted over the years, which help us be a safer community and better pilots. I can assure you it is very much appreciated. Good on you mate, your efforts are worthy of some recognition. Well done! Kind regards Planey
  2. 5 points
    Hi All. Jack Ferguson from Hunter Valley here. My buddy max and I (Both 15yrs old) are looking for work cleaning planes/hangers or doing any other work that needs to be done to help us fund our flying. We are both currently flying our of Cessnock but happy to travel if an opportunity arrises for some work at other places. We can only do weekend work because of school during the week, but available in school holidays during the weeks. If you would like to chat further or have any questions please email us or feel free to call. Email: [email protected] Ph: 0439889861. Regards Jack Ferguson and Max Wheeler
  3. 4 points
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-06-17/this-former-miss-nepal-contestant-is-now-an-everest-rescue-pilot/11204428 And she still has to get up at 5am to cook her father's meals for the day!
  4. 4 points
    I would like to thank the Leeton gliding club for a friendly, well organised gathering on the weekend of 15/6, I flew the Brumby from Albury late Saturday afternoon (due to the blessed fog, lots of fog ) and met up with approximately 20 people in 16 planes. There was a good cross section of the flying community and planes. I am sorry I do not remember all the brands and models. After securing the plane We adjourned to the fire for evening of light hearted chit chat, The Leeton gliding club supplied lunch, an evening meal and breakfast all at a very reasonable cost. The on site accommodation with hot showers was brilliant. People were offering rides in a biplane and a couple of RVs which was followed by a aerial display. There were people coming an going during the day. what a fantastic sight of all the planes lined up against the back drop of the club house and hangars. The landing strips were smooth and well maintained. Another top camping / flying weekend . I can recommend Leeton as a destination, great town and fantastic people. This impromptu gathering was a spur of the moment thing and YLEE gliding club excelled. I really like these weekends
  5. 3 points
    Thanks Guys . I really hadn't noticed the milestone. (approaching). Flying is not like lifting weights. You have to think more and assess yourself in an honest fashion. . That's not easy. No alcohol tonight. I'm pretty much getting off it. Better quality, less often. (special occasions) REAL ones... support Tyabb. Getting rid of that facility would be BS and must not happen. Australia was built on aviation.....Cheers and thanks. Nev
  6. 3 points
    I have just completed the 100th aircraft profile on the Showcase. It has received over 5,600 views.
  7. 2 points
    I wish some more pilots knew how to use the propulsion system properly ! Which I happen to use and like !
  8. 2 points
    Done. I had to tickle it a few times to make it work. Check it works for you and get others to sign.. Nev
  9. 2 points
    Might be a bit early to blame the propulsion system; we know nothing about the cause of this prang. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
  10. 2 points
    Probably due to the need to push students through the course. In wartime you don't have the luxury of a slow and steady development of recruits. There would have been many reasons like a sky full of aircraft whose pilots were at different skill levels. Weather and equipment failures would have taken their toll. Every wartime air force had high training fatality rates. Then after the pilots were "qualified" they killed themselves and crew during mission training. It was common, too, for mid-air collisions to occur while those huge bomber formations were forming up after take off. So the Yanks had things like this: …or this: …or any of a hundred and one other wacky paint jobs. These are genuine colour schemes used by what were called ‘assembly ships’ (also sometimes known, cynically, as ‘judas goats’) The assembly ships were worn out bombers, brightly painted with unit-specific high-visibility patterns, and equipped with signal lighting, and flares, who would take off before the rest of the formation and act as a point of reference for the rest of the bombers to formate on, forming what they called a Combat box. Once the bomber force was in formation, the assembly ships went back to base.
  11. 1 point
    https://www.change.org/p/mornington-peninsula-shire-council-help-save-our-airport-peninsula-aero-club
  12. 1 point
    Thanks Nev, I always make a point of reading your posts, always informative , useful advice, obviously based on a tonne of experience and you have a knack for teaching/explaining your point. Go on, write a book, I'd buy it ;)
  13. 1 point
    [TABLE] [TR] [TD]15/6/2019[/TD] [TD]Moorabbin Airport[/TD] [TD]VIC[/TD] [TD]Jabiru[/TD] [TD]J160C[/TD] [TD]Jabiru[/TD] [TD]22B333[/TD] [TD]The aircraft experienced a partial loss of engine power and vibration at 300ft after take-off and wa... [/TD] [/TR] [TR] [TD]The aircraft experienced a partial loss of engine power and vibration at 300ft after take-off and was unable to maintain altitude. The pilot conducted a forced landing into the golf course north of the upwind end of the RWY.[/TD] [TD][/TD] [TD][/TD] [TD][/TD] [TD][/TD] [TD][/TD] [TD][/TD] [TD][/TD] [/TR] [/TABLE]
  14. 1 point
    Agreed, and it’s entertaining too.
  15. 1 point
    Thanks everyone for all the good clues. I don’t really need that book now! Cheers, Jack.
  16. 1 point
  17. 1 point
    He has the same desk as before with two MFDs in front, cyclic and a collective lever.
  18. 1 point
    Can't get the site to "stick". Keeps dissappearing.....
  19. 1 point
    Would it help to shove this up the Council's nose? https://vhd.heritagecouncil.vic.gov.au/places/12650 The Butler Hangar is of significance to the State of Victoria for its rarity and uniqueness, and its historical, architectural and scientific (technical) significance. The Butler Hangar is historically significant as a place in which Australia's most advanced military plane, the CA 15, was developed. The hangar is of architectural and scientific (technical) importance as an intact example of a prefabricated and transportable hangar. It was designed in such a way as to permit dismantling and re-erection and for this reason, its removal to another aerodrome or site of aeronautical association, can be entertained. And these two documents: https://www.mornpen.vic.gov.au/files/assets/public/new-website-documents/building-amp-planning/heritage/docs/strategic_heritage_mornington_study_pt1.pdf https://www.mornpen.vic.gov.au/files/assets/public/new-website-documents/building-amp-planning/heritage/docs/strategic_heritage_mornington_study_pt2.pdf
  20. 1 point
    While I find Bex's ideas and updates interesting, what I most like is his quick wit. And when my wife and her sister took a trip to China a couple of years ago, Bex and his wife met them in Chengdu, took them out to dinner and were generally very hospitable to a pair of travelling Aussies. So my point is, whatever you think about his aviation credentials, he's a nice bloke with a snappy sense of humour, and I miss his posts.
  21. 1 point
    I would have thought that not knowing where all the wires are would be part of training for operations overseas. No sense making training absolutely risk free and then expecting safe operations in a third world country, although there ought to be less wires there.
  22. 1 point
    I suspect it might be related to the fact that they use trees and such for cover and camouflage to train in a realistic fashion. It's obvious that he was too high. If he was low enough, he wouldn't have hit the wire.
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