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Showing content with the highest reputation on 26/08/19 in Posts

  1. 2 points
    We once had an employee who begged to be kept on although he had a serious heart condition. We kept him on but got him to sign a waiver saying that it was is own choice. When he died at work the family hit us for everything and won, apparently he could not sign away their rights.
  2. 2 points
    Have to be one of the hardest to see over the nose planes ever built. Nev
  3. 1 point
    This thread is for anyone who is having any issues, needs help on "How To Do" or has a suggestion for an enhancement with the new forum software. Any posts you make will be acted on and replied to. Your issue will be quoted in the reply with it either being fixed or an alternative solution provided. When the issue is fixed, your post and replies will remain for a short period of time as an advisory to other users. They will then be deleted as it will no longer be an issue. Enhancement suggestions will all be combined into one post so I can address them as a "Task List" that I will look into as time permits so we can build the Forums, the heart of the site to a high standard and with comprehensive features that you want and are ALL happy with. It's YOUR site so help me to help you...Thanks for your help
  4. 1 point
    Steve Holland flies his exceptional scratch built scale replica of the DH.88 Comet G-ACSS 'Grosvenor House' that won the famous 1934 England-Australia MacRobertson Air Race from the United Kingdom to Australia. This model is powered by 2 Zenoah 74s. and in total it cost Steve £5000 in materials to build it. The de Havilland DH.88 Comet is a British two-seat, twin-engined aircraft built by the de Havilland Aircraft Company. It was developed specifically to participate in the 1934 England-Australia MacRobertson Air Race from the United Kingdom to Australia. Development of the DH.88 Comet was initiated at the behest of British aviation pioneer Geoffrey de Havilland, along with the support of de Havilland's board, being keen to garner prestige from producing the victorious aircraft as well as to gain from the research involved in producing it. The Comet was designed by A. E. Hagg around the specific requirements of the race; Hagg produced an innovative design in the form of a stressed-skin cantilever monoplane, complete with an enclosed cockpit, retractable undercarriage, landing flaps, and variable-pitch propellers. Three Comets were produced for the race, all for private owners at the discounted price of £5,000 per aircraft. The aircraft underwent a rapid development cycle, performing its maiden flight only six weeks prior to the race. Comet G-ACSS Grosvenor House emerged as the winner. Two further examples were later built. The Comet went on to establish a multitude of aviation records, both during the race and in its aftermath, as well as participating in further races. Several examples were bought and evaluated by national governments, typically as mail planes. Two Comets, G-ACSS and G-ACSP, survived into preservation, while a number of full-scale replicas have also been constructed. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q2jljXCqotw
  5. 1 point
    Public Liability insurance was a concept I had not encountered until I came to Australia. Where I previously lived there was something called Accident Compensation & every employer paid into it plus there were levies on car regos etc. It covered all residents for any accident anywhere. It was enshrined in law and there were specific amounts for the assessed disability etc. In return the right to sue was removed. I think it is an excellent system and removes some of the graft from the system here where someone sues a shop for millions just because they were careless and tripped on something. The USA is king when it comes to suing for just about anything but Australia is close behind. Interestingly this trend did not really start till the 1970s. Before then personal responsibility was considered normal. I pay public liability for my hangar & aerodrome through our hangar owners group scheme, aeroplane via my RAA membership, car via Rego CTP, & house & contents via my homeowners insurance. I do not insure my aeroplane hull or my hangar from an asset perspective. The cost outweighs the risk in my opinion. Most of my tools etc are still covered under my homeowners cover anyway.
  6. 1 point
    Believe it or not, I don’t have any photos of them even though I maintained them for almost ten years! Good luck finding them.
  7. 1 point
    A beautiful speed machine. It is easy to see its child the Mosquito in its genes. I guess taxiing would have been a case of hope nothing is in the way. The massive circular airfields that were still common might have helped.
  8. 1 point
    Jackeroo??? ... No-o-o-o-o. Definitely not. Sounds like something all the big-hat wearing, rodeo rough-riders, circle-burnout bogans, and the B&S Ball mob, would instantly flock to ...
  9. 1 point
    Hi please see video of the Zenith Cruzer VG installation and review also some small mods
  10. 1 point
    1. I’ve mentioned that there in no difference between industrial and private environments; a duty of care is a duty of care for both. 2. I made us clear that the USE is what counts when you fly out of a paddock. The method of closing down that use is laying down white crosses on the field, otherwise you have the duty of care. Calling it a paddock carries no weight and in fact is likely to be used against you as an example of being dodgy. 3. You will run out of coverage if you try to claim on what you call comprehensive insurance. 4. My so/called vision has been in force since 1932.
  11. 1 point
    Yes, the site is currently being migrated to a new server and the Search function has to be re-indexed to find all the new posts again...it will take several more hours to go through the entire site, in fact you are now seeing the site on a Server located in France and there is very little impact to us in Australia but a massive performance improvement to potential International users. Our server guy in Greece is working away at it and then will set up the new Australian server for Whats Up Australia and Clear Prop. Load Times: Country Previous Now (or will be) Australia 1 sec 1.1 sec USA 2.8 sec 1.3 sec Europe/UK 3.2 sec 1 sec This should bring a greater International audience to the site plus I am creating a greater link to Facebook and Twitter as well
  12. 1 point
    You are starting to make a case for not insuring. Surely this is a personal choice that one should not be criticised for doing. Only gamble IF you can afford to LOSE, and how much better would the Country be if people thought that way? The mates you have might be quite capable of doing the right thing but the grieving spouse and her new partner's Lawyer might think otherwise. Nev
  13. 1 point
  14. 1 point
    Yes, the site is currently being migrated to a new server and the Search function has to be re-indexed to find all the new posts again...should only be a little while now, in fact you are now seeing the site on a Server located in France and there is very little impact for us in Australia but a massive performance improvement to potential International users
  15. 1 point
    I have imported the Never Ending Story thread so the whole site has to re-index itself which is what it is currently doing
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