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old man emu

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old man emu last won the day on January 15

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About old man emu

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  • Birthday March 18

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    Narellan Vale, New South Wales,
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    Australia

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  1. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    I don't use my speedometer to check my speed. I have cross-referenced its indication with GPS information. Now I drive 7 to 10% above the speed indicated by my speedometer, and know that I'm sitting on the speed limit. Talking about governments requiring strict compliance with speed limits ... I believe that in Victoria authorities allow virtually no leeway. Is it true that you can get photographed for 103/100? It seems that when Victorians are driving in NSW they consistently drive below the speed limit, slower than the passing NSW drivers. Not that it stops them killing themselves between Parkes and Coonabarabran on the Newell Hwy as they try to make it from Melbourne to the Gold Coast in one hit.
  2. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    Turbo said: "The current driver training vs the current road toll indicates the training policy is about right. M61A1 said: "I was amazed at [what] these people teach the next generation of drivers, with no real concern about actual competence. I'm against you on that one, Turbo. I see some atrocious acts carried out by Learner drivers under the supervision of "Professional" instructors. Simple things, like not keeping left on multi-laned roads where the speed limit is 100 or above and Learners are restricted to 80. The very worst thing is allowing Learners, on whose Permits the ink is still wet (ie no more than 10 hours' experience) to set off into everyday traffic. One of my goals is to produce a driver training syllabus for kids being taught by their parents. There would be some stuff in it about the physics of vehicle motion (not too heavy), about the way power from the engine gets to the wheels, and how the grip of tyres affects vehicle movement. A big point I would make is that a driver should always preserve a Zone of Safety in front and to the sides of the vehicle. Does this sound familiar? It should to any pilot. It's basically the same approach we take to ab initio pilot training. Identify the skills to be introduced to the student. Develop a step-by-step program to introduce the skills to the student. Demonstrate the skill to the student. Provide the opportunity for the student to experience the skill. Have the student critique his/her application of the skill. Remedy sub-standard performance of the skill. Allow the student to practice the skill with less and less involvement by the instructor. Have the student complete a critique of performance after each learning session. Relate the time limit for each learning session to the degree of complexity of the skill.
  3. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    Here I go. Sinning against myself. There are three overall components of a traffic collision: The Driver The Vehicle The Road. Over the past 50+ years we have seen major improvements in the passive safety of vehicles. Also breakages such as snapped steering rods or dropped tailshafts have almost been things confined to history due to better manufacturing practices and improvements in metalurgy. In the same time our roads have been upgraded from windy, one lane each way, irregularly radiused curves, and blind crests. Improvements in these two components have had major influences in reducing collisions and their effects on vehicle occupants. That leaves the third component - the Driver. This component of the traffic collision matrix has barely been addressed. Sure, offence detection practices (RBT, speed detection etc) have been flogged to death because they are the easy fix. What haven't been addressed are the Human Factors of motoring. I'm sick and tired of driving around with people sitting on the RS of my car. I feel like putting a sticker on the back of my car reading, "GET OFF MY ARSE - I'M NOT A KINGS CROSS RENT BOY". These are the same drivers who go around you and blatt off into the distance, only to have me stop right behind them at the next set of lights. We should, nay MUST, introduce the study of Human Factors as they relate to driving into our High School curricula from about Year 9. The matters we should be teaching our youngsters are not difficult to grasp: The road system is an integral component of the economic system. The flow of traffic must not be interrupted as a result of the excessive egocentric behaviour of drivers. Don't drive like hare, or a tortoise. The average speed of the flow of traffic within metropolitan area is 10 to 20 kph below the signposted limits over a 20 to 50 kilometre journey. Learn to live with it. You'll make up for a couple of seconds lost through being courteous at the next set of traffic lights. Plan your trip. Know the estimated time to complete it. Use GPS-based planners or Google Maps to find out how long the journey will take. Explore alternate routes. Explore Rat Runs along your normal journeys so you can avoid delays caused by people who don't do as advised in No. 1 above. Practise vehicle handling (stopping, starting and cornering) so that you don't inflict abnormal G-loads on your passenger. Practise maintaining a constant engine RPM and letting the gearbox bring the vehicle up to cruise speed.
  4. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    😲 Wow! just how far off-track can this thread get? It started to drift at Post #12. Turbo's post above was #52. Looks like an unforcast wind shift has occurred.
  5. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    The figures for the refurbishment were chosen deliberately in order to remove the rose-coloured glasses from anyone who thought that they could get into their own plane cheaply. If the plane is going to be your pride and joy, then I don't see any difference between you and the guy who spends a motza restoring an old car, or making a new car ready for the race track. It's the bloke who buys a plane on impluse, or for bragging rights that I'm trying to warn.
  6. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    A lot of the work involved in getting a plane to be a head-turner is grunt work that anyone can do. Striping old fabric; paint stripping, removing panels are some of the jobs an owner can do to cut the costs of restoration. A couple of lessons from a fabric expert (say $150 per hour) will get you on the way to stitching new fabric to the airframe and wings, after the expert has applied the fabric. Doing some practice pieces in your garage will get you up to speed to give your plane a paint job. (Stitching and painting need to be overseen by an expert, but not necessarily done by them. Leave engine and instrument work to an expert. You can always help to lift wings and things as they are re-attached after refurbishment. If you budgeted for the cost for aircraft to have an Annual Inspection - About $2000 to be generous, plus about $5000 to remove and refit the engine, get the prop inspected, new tyres, instrument calibration, plus about $10000 for fabric work, then, if the engine was within hours, you would have a pretty good estimate of how much it costs to turn an ugly duckling into a swan.
  7. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    Getting back on track ..... Here's a very nice historic plane which was offered for peanuts. At a gross weight of 748.5 kg and stall speed of 47 kts, these two-seaters from Piper would be nice on the RAA register. However, this one does prove the point that you can buy a clapped out plane for a song, but you'll be paying the piper heaps before you are done with it.
  8. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    Getting back on track ..... Here's a very nice historic plane which was offered for peanuts. At a gross weight of 748.5 kg and stall speed of 47 kts, these two-seaters from Piper would be nice on the RAA register. However, this one does prove the point that you can buy a clapped out plane for a song, but you'll be paying the piper heaps before you are done with it.
  9. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    Getting back on track ..... Here's a very nice historic plane which was offered for peanuts. At a gross weight of 748.5 kg and stall speed of 47 kts, these two-seaters from Piper would be nice on the RAA register. However, this one does prove the point that you can buy a clapped out plane for a song, but you'll be paying the piper heaps before you are done with it.
  10. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    Getting back on track ..... Here's a very nice historic plane which was offered for peanuts. At a gross weight of 748.5 kg and stall speed of 47 kts, these two-seaters from Piper would be nice on the RAA register. However, this one does prove the point that you can buy a clapped out plane for a song, but you'll be paying the piper heaps before you are done with it.
  11. old man emu

    Dalby crop duster destroyed

    There are many old pilots, and there are many bold pilots, but there are few old and bold pilots, an observation made in 1949 by early US airmail pilot, E. Hamilton Lee
  12. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    Notice the difference in opinion between the driver from the Country (M61A1) and the one from the City (Turbo). Here's an intersection in Dalby, Qld (Country) and one in Narellan Dalby Narellan Moorabbin The driver from the country town doesn't have to cope with the short sight distances and high traffic flows that the city driver does.
  13. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    It's not a problem when the grey cars are approaching with running lights showing. It's when these cars are coming from the side, say for instance, coming out of a shaded side street.
  14. old man emu

    Silly Pictures involving Aircraft.

    If they's women, then the one near the windscreen is post-menopausal, going by the bushy moustache.
  15. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    On the grounds of occupant protection; occupant comfort; ease of driving, and economical fuel consumption, you'd be mad not to be driving a relatively new vehicle if you could. However, modern cars are simply a means to get from A to B. I've long ago given up trying to identify the model of any car in the traffic around me. The best I get to is identifying the maker from the badge on the boot. One maker's cars are fairly indistinguishable from another maker's now. The guiding factor in body design is the reduction in aerodynamic drag, so it stands to reason that all makers are going to produce similar body shapes in each category of vehicle. Even colour choice is restricted. (Talking of colours, have you noticed the current crop of dark grey cars? That colour is dangerous as it camouflages the car, making it disappear into the background road surface. Where are the bright colours? Have Millenials lost their sense of colour excitement? What would they say to the return of dark bronze coloured cars and glorious Mission Brown houses?) If you are enthusiastic enough about the cars and planes of your younger days, and buy into one for restoration, you'll know that it is not going to be done for financial gain. You'll be paying and paying to gain satisfaction. Is that any different from those who enjoy a pint and a punt, or regularly do 18 holes?
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