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old man emu

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Everything posted by old man emu

  1. I've come across another example of a neophyte aviator buying a plane on impulse. This fellow had his own, successful business in a non-aviation related field. He made the decision to get his pilot's licence. He was still in the early pre-solo stage of his training when he decided that he would buy his own plane, which he did. Now, it was not even certain that he would complete his training, and if he did, his first hundred hours or so would be Day VFR flying. But, seemingly having the readies, he went out and bought a powerful IFR category plane. Perhaps he thought he could subsidize his financial outlay by putting the aircraft 'on line'. One has to wonder if the supporting information for the purchase was studied with the same care he may have put into submitting a tender for work in the non-aviation field he worked in. Well, the plane he purchased was pushing 40 years old. I don't know if he had expert do a pre-purchase inspection for him, or if he just bought it off the ad. Before too long Annual Inspection time comes around. As you might have guessed. the inspection by the careful LAME tasked with the job revealed a few maintenance jobs that could be reasonably expected to be needed in a plane of this age. Things like a welding repair to the exhaust pipe, a few worn bits, spark plugs, filters etc. However the body-blow came from the instrument certification. Remember that this plane was registered in the IFR category. Well, inspection of one of the IFR instruments showed it was faulty and needed to be replaced. Sounds simple enough. Whip out the dud part and put back a new one. But this plane was pushing 40 years since manufacture. The original equipment manufacturer (OEM) had long ago gone out of business, so a new OEM part did not exist. The owner wanted to keep the plane in IFR category. So it was decided to obtain a similarly functioning part from another supplier. But the new part did not fit the mounting for the old part. Not a big deal. Just design and fit a suitable mounting. But wait! this is a certified aircraft. You can't just make anything you like and fit it to the plane. You have to get aeronautical engineers to design the fitting and document how and where it is to be installed. That requires an Engineering Order. Can you see where this is going? Every step means more and more dollars. Eventually the bill to certify the aircraft in the IFR category cost more than the cost of the Annual Inspection, even though the cost of the replacement part itself was only about 10% of the eventual total. Not long after the Certificate of Airworthiness was issued, the owner sold the aircraft. I'm not sure if he even completed his training. The moral to the story is that you can buy an old airplane cheaply, but be prepared to put bags of money into it. It that unrealistic? NO. Think about the dream car of your youth. Do you have friends who have bought something like an EH, or or XP Futura to restore? With a bit of searching you can find a rough one for under $5000, or maybe even a bag of peanuts. But to get it to a show-winning condition your friends will be happy to throw thousands at it. It's the same if you buy a cheap old Cessna or Cherokee. Buy cheap, but in the knowledge to end up having something you can wow the crowds with, know what the final cost will be, and that you can bear it. I think I could go out now and buy a TriPacer for under $5000, because it hasn't flown for years; the wing tips, at least, need replacing due to rot; the engine needs to be overhauled because it has been sitting, and it needs a complete recovering. Not to mention the jobs that would come out of the CofA inspection. Doing a lot of the work myself, I wouldn't expect to have a razoo left out of at least $50,000. Would the plane be worth $55,000 on the market? I doubt it. But it would be my plane; restored to my liking. And, hopefully, not having gone over the budget I set for the project before I bought the plane. Here's an example of how one Yank started with a Cherokee bought for one dollar And here's one where the owner went the whole hog:
  2. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    I don't use my speedometer to check my speed. I have cross-referenced its indication with GPS information. Now I drive 7 to 10% above the speed indicated by my speedometer, and know that I'm sitting on the speed limit. Talking about governments requiring strict compliance with speed limits ... I believe that in Victoria authorities allow virtually no leeway. Is it true that you can get photographed for 103/100? It seems that when Victorians are driving in NSW they consistently drive below the speed limit, slower than the passing NSW drivers. Not that it stops them killing themselves between Parkes and Coonabarabran on the Newell Hwy as they try to make it from Melbourne to the Gold Coast in one hit.
  3. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    Turbo said: "The current driver training vs the current road toll indicates the training policy is about right. M61A1 said: "I was amazed at [what] these people teach the next generation of drivers, with no real concern about actual competence. I'm against you on that one, Turbo. I see some atrocious acts carried out by Learner drivers under the supervision of "Professional" instructors. Simple things, like not keeping left on multi-laned roads where the speed limit is 100 or above and Learners are restricted to 80. The very worst thing is allowing Learners, on whose Permits the ink is still wet (ie no more than 10 hours' experience) to set off into everyday traffic. One of my goals is to produce a driver training syllabus for kids being taught by their parents. There would be some stuff in it about the physics of vehicle motion (not too heavy), about the way power from the engine gets to the wheels, and how the grip of tyres affects vehicle movement. A big point I would make is that a driver should always preserve a Zone of Safety in front and to the sides of the vehicle. Does this sound familiar? It should to any pilot. It's basically the same approach we take to ab initio pilot training. Identify the skills to be introduced to the student. Develop a step-by-step program to introduce the skills to the student. Demonstrate the skill to the student. Provide the opportunity for the student to experience the skill. Have the student critique his/her application of the skill. Remedy sub-standard performance of the skill. Allow the student to practice the skill with less and less involvement by the instructor. Have the student complete a critique of performance after each learning session. Relate the time limit for each learning session to the degree of complexity of the skill.
  4. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    Here I go. Sinning against myself. There are three overall components of a traffic collision: The Driver The Vehicle The Road. Over the past 50+ years we have seen major improvements in the passive safety of vehicles. Also breakages such as snapped steering rods or dropped tailshafts have almost been things confined to history due to better manufacturing practices and improvements in metalurgy. In the same time our roads have been upgraded from windy, one lane each way, irregularly radiused curves, and blind crests. Improvements in these two components have had major influences in reducing collisions and their effects on vehicle occupants. That leaves the third component - the Driver. This component of the traffic collision matrix has barely been addressed. Sure, offence detection practices (RBT, speed detection etc) have been flogged to death because they are the easy fix. What haven't been addressed are the Human Factors of motoring. I'm sick and tired of driving around with people sitting on the RS of my car. I feel like putting a sticker on the back of my car reading, "GET OFF MY ARSE - I'M NOT A KINGS CROSS RENT BOY". These are the same drivers who go around you and blatt off into the distance, only to have me stop right behind them at the next set of lights. We should, nay MUST, introduce the study of Human Factors as they relate to driving into our High School curricula from about Year 9. The matters we should be teaching our youngsters are not difficult to grasp: The road system is an integral component of the economic system. The flow of traffic must not be interrupted as a result of the excessive egocentric behaviour of drivers. Don't drive like hare, or a tortoise. The average speed of the flow of traffic within metropolitan area is 10 to 20 kph below the signposted limits over a 20 to 50 kilometre journey. Learn to live with it. You'll make up for a couple of seconds lost through being courteous at the next set of traffic lights. Plan your trip. Know the estimated time to complete it. Use GPS-based planners or Google Maps to find out how long the journey will take. Explore alternate routes. Explore Rat Runs along your normal journeys so you can avoid delays caused by people who don't do as advised in No. 1 above. Practise vehicle handling (stopping, starting and cornering) so that you don't inflict abnormal G-loads on your passenger. Practise maintaining a constant engine RPM and letting the gearbox bring the vehicle up to cruise speed.
  5. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    😲 Wow! just how far off-track can this thread get? It started to drift at Post #12. Turbo's post above was #52. Looks like an unforcast wind shift has occurred.
  6. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    The figures for the refurbishment were chosen deliberately in order to remove the rose-coloured glasses from anyone who thought that they could get into their own plane cheaply. If the plane is going to be your pride and joy, then I don't see any difference between you and the guy who spends a motza restoring an old car, or making a new car ready for the race track. It's the bloke who buys a plane on impluse, or for bragging rights that I'm trying to warn.
  7. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    A lot of the work involved in getting a plane to be a head-turner is grunt work that anyone can do. Striping old fabric; paint stripping, removing panels are some of the jobs an owner can do to cut the costs of restoration. A couple of lessons from a fabric expert (say $150 per hour) will get you on the way to stitching new fabric to the airframe and wings, after the expert has applied the fabric. Doing some practice pieces in your garage will get you up to speed to give your plane a paint job. (Stitching and painting need to be overseen by an expert, but not necessarily done by them. Leave engine and instrument work to an expert. You can always help to lift wings and things as they are re-attached after refurbishment. If you budgeted for the cost for aircraft to have an Annual Inspection - About $2000 to be generous, plus about $5000 to remove and refit the engine, get the prop inspected, new tyres, instrument calibration, plus about $10000 for fabric work, then, if the engine was within hours, you would have a pretty good estimate of how much it costs to turn an ugly duckling into a swan.
  8. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    Getting back on track ..... Here's a very nice historic plane which was offered for peanuts. At a gross weight of 748.5 kg and stall speed of 47 kts, these two-seaters from Piper would be nice on the RAA register. However, this one does prove the point that you can buy a clapped out plane for a song, but you'll be paying the piper heaps before you are done with it.
  9. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    Getting back on track ..... Here's a very nice historic plane which was offered for peanuts. At a gross weight of 748.5 kg and stall speed of 47 kts, these two-seaters from Piper would be nice on the RAA register. However, this one does prove the point that you can buy a clapped out plane for a song, but you'll be paying the piper heaps before you are done with it.
  10. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    Getting back on track ..... Here's a very nice historic plane which was offered for peanuts. At a gross weight of 748.5 kg and stall speed of 47 kts, these two-seaters from Piper would be nice on the RAA register. However, this one does prove the point that you can buy a clapped out plane for a song, but you'll be paying the piper heaps before you are done with it.
  11. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    Getting back on track ..... Here's a very nice historic plane which was offered for peanuts. At a gross weight of 748.5 kg and stall speed of 47 kts, these two-seaters from Piper would be nice on the RAA register. However, this one does prove the point that you can buy a clapped out plane for a song, but you'll be paying the piper heaps before you are done with it.
  12. old man emu

    Dalby crop duster destroyed

    There are many old pilots, and there are many bold pilots, but there are few old and bold pilots, an observation made in 1949 by early US airmail pilot, E. Hamilton Lee
  13. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    Notice the difference in opinion between the driver from the Country (M61A1) and the one from the City (Turbo). Here's an intersection in Dalby, Qld (Country) and one in Narellan Dalby Narellan Moorabbin The driver from the country town doesn't have to cope with the short sight distances and high traffic flows that the city driver does.
  14. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    It's not a problem when the grey cars are approaching with running lights showing. It's when these cars are coming from the side, say for instance, coming out of a shaded side street.
  15. old man emu

    Silly Pictures involving Aircraft.

    If they's women, then the one near the windscreen is post-menopausal, going by the bushy moustache.
  16. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    On the grounds of occupant protection; occupant comfort; ease of driving, and economical fuel consumption, you'd be mad not to be driving a relatively new vehicle if you could. However, modern cars are simply a means to get from A to B. I've long ago given up trying to identify the model of any car in the traffic around me. The best I get to is identifying the maker from the badge on the boot. One maker's cars are fairly indistinguishable from another maker's now. The guiding factor in body design is the reduction in aerodynamic drag, so it stands to reason that all makers are going to produce similar body shapes in each category of vehicle. Even colour choice is restricted. (Talking of colours, have you noticed the current crop of dark grey cars? That colour is dangerous as it camouflages the car, making it disappear into the background road surface. Where are the bright colours? Have Millenials lost their sense of colour excitement? What would they say to the return of dark bronze coloured cars and glorious Mission Brown houses?) If you are enthusiastic enough about the cars and planes of your younger days, and buy into one for restoration, you'll know that it is not going to be done for financial gain. You'll be paying and paying to gain satisfaction. Is that any different from those who enjoy a pint and a punt, or regularly do 18 holes?
  17. old man emu

    Any Site Problems...Site Support

    When I start a thread, I activate the slider so that I can be notified of replies to it. That makes it easier to see which of my threads I should go to to see what others have posted there. I'm not getting any notifications. What's happening????
  18. Here's a source https://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/cheltenham/textbooks/aviation-theory-books-and-practice-exams/1198568196
  19. old man emu

    The over-eager neophyte crashes and burns.

    How much you spend on an old plane depends on your feelings for it. How many people spend bags of cash on their cars or boats? These old planes are just the same, especially if the make and model brings back happy memories. If I had won the $80 million on Powerball tonight, I might have gone looking at an old TriPacer and spent heaps on it. I know that the money could not be recouped in my lifetime, but while I was alive I would have a plane that made me happy. My wife wouldn't let me buy or build a plane when I retired, but she OK'd the purchase of a motor bike. So I bought the type of bike I had when I was a kid. I spent a couple of thousand on it. Now it is valued at quite a few thousand more than the purchase price + refurb costs. Sometimes old stuff gets more valuable as time goes by. However, we are getting into thread drift. The gist of my first post was that looking to buy a plane through rose coloured glasses can only result in a big hit to the hip pocket nerve and a terminal dose of disappointment.
  20. old man emu

    ra aus 10- prefix. still used?

    Can you reserve the number like you can with CASA?
  21. old man emu

    Silly aviation pictures.

    How do you get type rated on that?
  22. old man emu

    Looking for Les Foster

    Les Foster was a mate of mine back in the 70's in Dubbo. We used to fly Dubbo Flying School's PA-28 Arrow, and PA28 (VH-WES - which is not based at Camden). Les also used to be a tug pilot at Narromine, flying a Piper TriPacer. We also used to fly over to George Campbell's at Mudgee for Sunday bar-b-ques. In the early 80's, Les took himself over the Miami and got his commercial licence. He returned to Australia and got a job with DCA in Papua-New Guinea assessing landing strips and writing up approach plates for them. I lost contact with him when I joined the Police and moved to Goulburn. I'd like to locate him to rekindle our friendship. I've tried a simple Google search; Linkedin, and the white pages without success. If anyone knew or knows Les, I'd appreciate any information that could help me track him down. Thanks Old man Emu
  23. I have just read a book about the 1940 Canberra crash of the RAAF Hudson which killed three members of Menzies' Cabinet as well as several high ranking military men. https://www.newsouthbooks.com.au/books/hudson-a1697_the-plane-crash-that-changed-australian-history/ The book does not delve into the crash itself, but the political ramifications of the deaths of the three Ministers, Geoffrey Street, Sir Henry Gullett and James Fairbairn which destabilised Robert Menzies’ wartime government. The book describes the political goings on, such as Menzies' trip to Britain and his trying to get himself a seat in the Commonwealth War Cabinet. It also outlines Menzies' career from the beginning of WWl until his defeat by the Curtin Labor government. Menzies comes out from the description as more British than the Union Jack, and less Australian than a Kiwi fly-half. As a law student at Melbourne University, he had "a reputation as an "unusually bright and articulate member of the undergraduate community", and was known as a skilful debater. However, he had also begun to develop the traits of pomposity and arrogance that would cause difficulties later in his career. His fellow law student and future parliamentary colleague Percy Joske noted Menzies as a student "did not suffer fools gladly [...] the trouble was that his opponents frequently were not fools and that he tended to say things that were not only cutting and unkind but that were unjustified"
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