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Justin Hawkins

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Justin Hawkins last won the day on April 7 2013

Justin Hawkins had the most liked content!

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About Justin Hawkins

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    Well-Known Member
  • Birthday 11/06/1982

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  • Gender
    male
  • Location
    Farmington, NM USA
  1. Justin Hawkins

    Drifter Shake up!

    Sam, I can help here------ Here's the start procedure: Lower flaps fuel pump on full throttle hold prime switch on for 8-10 seconds. When you release the prime switch, fuel pressure will increase slightly. Throttle Idle, then crack open a bit Start Verify oil pressure in green Immediately set RPM higher, around 2000-2200 for 1-2 minutes, then close throttle and it will idle smoothly. If the engine starts shaking and won't immediately build rpm right away, close the throttle and it'll shut off. This happens when the start sequence isn't quite right and it's pretty much unrecoverable. Try again with more primer and maybe a touch more throttle. fuel pump off This will minimize or eliminate the shaking on startup. Once the engine is warm, it'll idle very smoothly down to 1500rpm. It's not really an issue with the install, it's an inherent trait of the 912s, made worse by the unavoidable install design (no conventional firewall / mount. In flight, it's always been SUPER smooth, so if it's not, there may be another issue. MAN, I miss that airplane. So sorry I've delayed sending your other stuff, I promise to get it in the mail ASAP Justin
  2. Justin Hawkins

    Drifter Pics

  3. Justin Hawkins

    Converting SB582 to 912ULS

    Sure, I'd love to.....been meaning to reflect on the install. I started by gathering pics and details of existing 912 installs. There's not much out there, but as far as engine installation, the Lockwood 912 Super Drifter has similar, if not exactly the same dimensions as my Austflight Drifter. The wings, flaps, main tube, etc may be different, but that is somewhat irrelevant. My biggest concern was CG changes. The Lockwood bird fixes this by lengthening the fuse tube forward of the CG. Not an option for me of course. Instead, I chose to focus on doing the lightest install possible, and moving weight from the tail to the nose. My actual main motor mount beam is a Lockwood part (they insisted it wouldn't work on an Austflight, it did.). I removed the old mount, positioned the main beam and drilled and bushed the existing down tubes. I also chopped off the main wing root tube aft of the fitting. At this point I was committed. The most difficult part was designing a lower bracket that would adapt to the existing one. I used a stainless steel doubler spaced with aluminum. This part is impossible to explain, I'll have to post pictures. I then fabricated the alum bars that the motor mounts go in. You can purchase these from Lockwood if you don't want to build em, but it was easy. I was unimpressed with the component installs on a lot of the 912 drifters I've seen. Some have the oil tank mounted to high according to Rotax spec. Some have the radiator under the engine, behind the fuel tank. I could certainly be wrong, but that seems like it would get lots of vibration, require complex and long coolant lines and a larger radiator due to reduced airflow. So, I rethought the mounting of my components with CG in mind, and it worked out awesome. My radiator is a lightweight one off a shifter cart ( small race car) and is mounted to the aft main wing root bracket in a clever system using large rubber bushings. It's secure, far enough forward, and doesn't get a lot of vibration. The radiator itself is much smaller than others I've seen on the drifter, but is still way to big, given the airflow in receives. Coolant capacity is approx 1 gallon, which is almost twice rotax recommendation. I use NPG coolant and still only get 170 degree CHT on an 80 degree flight. I have to block off some radiator with duct tape if OAT is below 75. I'm planning to replace the radiator with one of the same dimensions, except thinner, in order to save weight and keep CHT where it should be. I mounted the oil cooler to the main beam just above the fuel tank, as far forward as reasonable. This works well and places it within rotax spec as far as height in relation to the engine, something few 912 Drifters do. This is important. The last hurdle was fitting the air cleaners where they wouldn't interfere with my flaps. I had to shorten the flap rods, move the brackets outboard, etc. I also had to abandon my original exhaust plan, as the exhaust tubes were to close to the flaps. This install would have been much easier without flaps, and the drifter doesn't need em. If I could have used the better exhaust, it also would have been a bit lighter. I went with a 60" 4 blade prop, but now wish I had a 62-64". There's more clearance than with the 582. SOOOO... I've now got almost 40 hours on the aircraft since the conversion. It's been great. The 20-25 lbs it gained in the conversion is not noticeable. My drifter is the strut braced flapped version, so it never had sporty handling. CG is within limits for up to a 190 lb passenger. I removed the trim tabs on the tail, moved the strobe up the the top of the radiator, and lightened the tail wheel. Cruise flight with no passenger is about 4500-4600 rpm. Climb is way more impressive, it's quieter, more reliable, and burns less fuel. I'd estimate my fuel burn to be 2.8 gallons / hr average. Maybe a bit less. It turned out to be a fantastic aerial photo platform, which is what I wanted. The added benefit of being able to take friends and family up without so much worry is great (density altitude here in the summer averages 8,000'). I also find myself going farther and longer with the 912. i was planning to take it to Oshkosh this year (1000 NM one way) but weather got nasty. I've always LOVED 2 stroke engines, especially the 503. I've owned and flown many ultralights, and still believe that the 2 stroke isn't necessarily less reliable just because it's a 2 stroke. That said, this 912 conversion was everything I thought it would be.
  4. Justin Hawkins

    Drifter Pics

  5. Justin Hawkins

    Prepping for a loooong cross country....

    Probably great advice Tex....I'm thinking 3 days each way....averaging 340 miles per day.
  6. Justin Hawkins

    Drifter Pics

    They're not really all pics OF the drifter, but lots of pics FROM the drifter here in my latest blog entry on my flight to Monument Valley.... http://www.shutterflightphotography.com/drifting-to-monument-valley/
  7. Justin Hawkins

    Prepping for a loooong cross country....

    Well, since I've got a fuel level indicator on the EMS, I think I'm gonna go with a transfer pump. It doesn't weigh much more, just a few ounces. It's just that if I'm gonna be aloft for long periods, I'd like to know for sure how much fuel is in the tank that I'm using....If the pump fails, I'll have plenty of time to find a spot. Anyway, I've been flying the drifter as much as possible, and doing longer and longer flights....Flew it to Monument Valley not long ago. Only 216 miles or so, round trip. I think on the long trip to Oshkosh I could easily do 400 - 450 miles a day, assuming good weather (I know, a big assumption) A link to the pictures / info of the trip... http://www.shutterflightphotography.com/drifting-to-monument-valley/
  8. Justin Hawkins

    Prepping for a loooong cross country....

    http://eaaforums.org/showthread.php?3809-Planning-the-Epic-cross-country A link to another forum post on the subject if anyone is interested.
  9. Justin Hawkins

    Prepping for a loooong cross country....

    Hi again guys, My 582 to 912 conversion has gone so well that I'm contemplating flying my drifter from my home in New Mexico to Oshkosh Airventure. It's over 1000 NM each way. Happens in late July. As long as I get another 20 or so test hours between now and then, I'm at least gonna try it. I've already got 20 hours on the bird since the 912 conversion was completed. So, in preparation, I'm planning to fit my aux belly tank. Since I'm also installing a fuel level sender in the main 8 gal tank, I'm planning on mounting a small solid state 12v pump to the belly tank, and only plumbing it to the main tank. As the main tank gets low, I'll refill with the transfer tank. Does that sound like a bad idea ? I figure it's best not to rely on the engine driven pump to lift the fuel any higher than it already does...
  10. Justin Hawkins

    Converting SB582 to 912ULS

    After a few hiccups - mainly a mismatched prop blade falsely diagnosed as a carb imbalance - I got her finished, tuned up, and FLYING !!!!! A few little details still to be worked out but so far so good.
  11. Justin Hawkins

    Converting SB582 to 912ULS

    Haven't had it running yet Tex, as I'm waiting on an oil pressure sender and prop hardware. Hope it runs......
  12. Justin Hawkins

    Converting SB582 to 912ULS

    Almost done! A link to my blog: http://www.shutterflightphotography.com/912-conversion/
  13. Justin Hawkins

    Converting SB582 to 912ULS

    Closer view of the radiator mount. I'm hoping mounting it up high like this won't cause any issues.
  14. Justin Hawkins

    Converting SB582 to 912ULS

    Progress is slow, but it's progress none the less. Got the radiator, oil cooler, and oil tank mounted. Any thoughts or advice ?
  15. Justin Hawkins

    Converting SB582 to 912ULS

    It's an 05 Elise. I use it mostly for road racing and autocross with the occasional cruise around town. Not a real practical car, but sure it fun. Like a go cart with a license plate.
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