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nickduncs84

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nickduncs84 last won the day on June 26 2014

nickduncs84 had the most liked content!

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About nickduncs84

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  • Birthday 13/06/1984

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  • Country
    Australia
  1. Just passing on what I was told from the pilot. Personally for a low hour pilot I thought he did extremely well. I won’t get into the religious debate around Jabs. Personally I loved flying them and bang for buck the 230 has to be the best aircraft on the market. Speed, climb performance, baggage space. It really is a great plane. That being said, I don’t have the same confidence in the engine as I do a lycoming/continental. I know that’s a religious debate in itself. Bruce, you are probably right about the maintenance side of things and I reckon if I had your experience and actually knew what I was doing, I’d be just as comfortable as you. I guess to a simpleton jab mx seems to be more mysterious than a lycoming. BTW I don’t reserve this opinion for jabs only. I wouldn’t put my family in the back of one of those piper Malibu’s for example.
  2. It was a blown cylinder from what I was told. He landed and both he and the aircraft were fine. Pretty long bow to be pointing any of the blame at the pilot.
  3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=saKPnSIu1iM another jab failure. I find it hard to believe that anytime a jab engine fails it’s because of improper mx.
  4. 28 L/H at 160 knots is probably pretty close or maybe even less than the typical jab/rotax on a $ per nm basis. Its pretty hard to match the RV9 in terms of pound for pound value all around
  5. Minority view. RA Aus has to make decisions to suit the majority of members. It can't always keep everyone happy. Members want higher weight limits and access to CTA. Also think about getting younger pilots into ra Aus to replace the older ones leaving. Most of the younger pilots want faster, more modern aircraft. If RA Aus are able to negotiate these changes it helps to secure the long term health of the organisation. Personally I am very happy with the RA Aus administration over the past couple of years and know that many others are too. Of course they are aware that they can't be all things to all people
  6. It wasn't a dig at anyone it's a simple fact. I never one spoke on area during my Ra Aus training. I'm sure that's not uncommon. I'm also not saying anything about anyone's capabilities as a pilot, that would be absurd. I'm also a big supporter of ra Aus getting access to cta. It was a simple observation that I don't think it's going to go down well with a lot of stakeholders if ra Aus pilots all start going out and making position reports and part of my reasoning is that it's not something that they've done in the past so how can they go out and do it without any training.
  7. I really just can't accept that a bunch of bug smasher RA Aus pilots with no CTA training going out and making position reports on area frequencies is a good idea. There is a sense of organisation when talking to ATC that doesn't exist on one way broadcast channels. The only time a position report on area would make any sense is when you are beyond 10nm from an airport or ALA on the chart and also arguably when not in radar range. Keeping in mind that you're also travelling at a correct vfr altitude, are looking outside regularly and are listening to area, I really can't see the point in thousands of aircraft among these new types of calls. Keeping in mind the fact that pretty much no one does or has ever done this and there hasn't been a collision like this in the past, I'd say it's overkill. To throw a bigger cat amongst the pidgeons, cost issues aside, the obvious solution is ads-b in and out in every aircraft. I know the pundits argue that relying on technology means eyes in the cockpit which is counter productive, but I'd take it any day over any of these radio based solutions. Sure in the busy terminal area you're better off using your eyes and ears but out in the middle of nowhere you'd probably only have 3-4 other aircraft within 100 miles of you so keeping track of them on a screen wouldn't take too much of your attention away from other things
  8. Imagine if every ultralight and GA in class G made position reports on area every 15 minutes....
  9. Why would he be making position reports on area frequency? Sounds like the same guy I heard making position reports on Adelaide centre over Hahndorf at 3,500 (1,000 ft inside class C). I reckon the ATC guys are pretty understanding and tolerate plenty of mistakes from us weekend warrior types but even they have their limits
  10. Maybe not a lot of good landing spots but not many trees either! Might bend something but could be worse! If you fly over Hahndorf, fly east from there over beerenberg strawberry farm and you'll see my hangar on the top of the hill about a mile from there!
  11. Fair point! Maybe they should change the discussion paper to discuss the real issue then. My strip is under the 2500 step at Adelaide at an elevation of 1500. It actually does get fairly busy in that 1000 ft gap as people transit outside cta. But still, I don't transmit on Adelaide centre. I know it's the rule but it doesn't make sense to me to interrupt atc. Multicom wouldn't make much sense either though as everyone would be on Adelaide centre. Strobe and transponder on and keep eyes and ears open. A few time I've heard Adelaide centre point me out to traffic octa as I depart or arrive.
  12. Never said unmarked aerodromes. They aren't the issue. There are way too many marked aerodromes on multi com. Loxton, Renmark, waikerie, Strathalbyn all near Adelaide and all a decent amount of activity. The issue of people having a BBQ at their unmarked strip surely isn't the real issue. Most people that use private strips would just monitor area and not make any radio calls. If it's just you at your own property then what's the point. And if you're having a BBQ then why can't you just inform the attendees of what frequency to use so that you can not run into each other.
  13. Agree completely. But training schools are the worst offenders and I'm guessing they are getting taught to make all those calls to get them ready for their airline lives of doing everything by the book. Same reason they fly 737 circuits in their diamonds. East of Adelaide is an absolute disaster with all the airports on multicom and the dozens of foreign students setting out on navs every week. Just give those airports their own frequency so we don't have to listen to it. How many people just turn multicom off because it's so annoying? That's not a good solution surely
  14. multicom is a nightmare as is. It needs to be used less not more. Why don't we just use more discreet ctaf frequencies.
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