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That "going backwards" point...


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... I finally hit it on this weekend's lesson. Up to this point, I have been progressing fairly well, gaining skill and confidence with each lesson, and starting to really put things together.

 

I've seen others post about how sometimes you have a lesson where you feel like you have actually gone backwards, and I know what that means now. It is nice to know that it seems to be a natural part of the deal, or at least that I am not the only one.

 

Nothing was clicking, I couldn't manage the rudders, couldn't line up properly, tried to extend flap above the white... just seemed to get flustered over every little thing. Took most of the hour to get myself back to where I felt like I was last lesson - in other words, nothing gained and nothing lost. - other than another 1.3 hours in the book.

 

I think from reading other posts, that just seems to happen, and I should bounce back OK next lesson - but i have to admit it has me a little spooked.

 

On other pursuits, such as the guitar for example, it happens all the time I suppose, but it doesn't stand out so much because I'm not sitting in a chair in the sky!!

 

Anyway, Hope everyone had a good time at NATFLY and hope by this time next year i can even attend!

 

adam

 

 

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Adam it is called a learning plateau and it happens to everyone. Keep plugging away and it will all fall into place and your learning will start to increase again. Don't be too spooked if you don't forge ahead in the next lesson either, you might feel stuck for a little while but don't panic, it won't last forever. Where are you up to in your training?

 

 

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Thanks guys, thought as much - but never quite "felt" the learning plateau quite like this before - whole different deal when you feel like your life is on the line :) And turby, you're so right, and in the end that's one of the things that makes a pursuit worthwhile; that you persevered whilst others would have packed it in.

 

Mazda, right now mostly practicing circuits and consolidating my training in prep for 1st solo. Still need to do stalls and forced landings as far as the lessons go. Early days...

 

 

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I had days like that when I was training and now I've got my PPL I still have days like that. Especially in the Jab, I've had times when I've had to do three go arounds in a row because I just couldn't get the landing together.

 

You'll get there :)

 

 

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I had days like that when I was training and now I've got my PPL I still have days like that. Especially in the Jab, I've had times when I've had to do three go arounds in a row because I just couldn't get the landing together.You'll get there :)

Wow Darky, but how can you have a day like that with no one in the right seat to fix you up? That's the scary part to me, is the thought that sooner or later i will have one of those days and FI won't be there to grab the controls.

 

Then again, I think part of it is the extra mental energy I consume trying to second guess myself in front of him, not wanting to be "scolded". Its almost like doing everything twice hehe :)

 

I've been riding motorcycles for close to 34 years give or take, and one of the things that stuck with me when i was learning to ride on the streets was the notion that everything I do has a mental cost associated with it. So if I have a "dollar" to spend, and I spend 50 cents just thinking about the throttle position and flaps etc, then that leaves me with only 50 cents for everything else, including emergencies. The idea being to "spend" as little as possible on the mechanics of it, leaving plenty in reserve for the enjoyment of it (that has a cost too), and if necessary unforeseen circumstances.

 

So practicing *correctly* to the point where as much as possible gets into muscle memory is the key - i can ride on the streets and am probably only spending 5 - 10 c of my mental capacity, leaving the rest for everything else. I guess I need to get there in the air as well, and only time and practice and patience is the key. I can't wait till the day i can take a flight and just "fly" while enjoying the scenery, having plenty of mental reserve to deal with the unexpected. That's what keeps me going!

 

Thanks everyone for all the encouragement. Still love to hear everyone's stories about similar situations!

 

 

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Learning Plateau! Am I the only one who fells like the first 50 odd hours in my log book felt like a damned plateau!!!! Every time I sat in that left seat I seemed to forget something or over look an issue or carry out some bloody action that made me feel like I was NEVER going to get this stupid flying thing down pat. Now why was that landing so ....... repetitive ...... the one just before it was magic!

 

I can tell you ayavner, the thing that drove me MAD was being surrounded by all the other students who seemed to just get it and talking with all those pilots who kept telling me "Don't worry one day it will just SNAP and you will be like, well how do I not get this before". I would fly around clicking my fingers going "SNAP ALREADY DAMNED YOU".

 

Interestingly though about a year ago I actually ran into one of the guys who was a student at the same time as me at the same flying school. I told him how annoyed I was watching him, being older than me he seemed to grasps the concepts better and handle the aircraft far more naturally than me. The guy laughed and said how envious he was of me at the same time. There he was at 30 odd years old, grappling with learning how to understand a fleet of new instruments, the phonetic alphabet and what the hell ailerons where all the time being surrounded by a snooty nosed 14 year old who knew his away around an aircraft blindfolded from birth!!!!! So I guess it is a matter of perspective!

 

I can tell you this for sure, things never went snap. I never experienced that magic moment where I suddenly understood all the aspects and concepts of handling an aircraft that I seemed to be leaving out right at the critical moment. Every time I go for a new endorsement or jump into a new aircraft for the first time, I hit that learning plateau again and try to desperately claw my way out of it!!!! All I know is on the rare occasions I get to jump into a 172 again (The aircraft I did the majority of my circuit training in), that gnarly machine that seemed to whip around the circuit at 30000000000000 knots, contain far to many levers and switches, have a totally unpredictable approach path the runway and an unbelievable ability to BOUNCE. Well it is the most docile, easy to fly baby I think I have ever been in, feel as though I could handle it just fine with a hand tied behind my back and a eye patch on! In fact when I am flying one of the lovely machines Mr. Cessna built I often feel myself thinking halfway down that final leg "Come on already, how slow is this airplane!!"

 

Stick with it, you'll get there!

 

 

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Wow Darky, but how can you have a day like that with no one in the right seat to fix you up? That's the scary part to me, is the thought that sooner or later i will have one of those days and FI won't be there to grab the controls.

At the time it was more frustrating than scary. I know I can land, it just wasn't coming together enough for to what I considered a safe landing. Although it's a licence to learn (and it *definitely* is) the confidence boost in my flying I got from getting my licence gave me the confidence to say in situations like that "I know I can do this, I passed a skills test showing I can do this, so just get it together Darky, ok?". Don't read that as overconfidence, because I am definitely not overconfident about my flying, but just that confidence inside that I've landed lots of times before so I just need to get it together and do it again.

 

 

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At the time it was more frustrating than scary. I know I can land, it just wasn't coming together enough for to what I considered a safe landing. Although it's a licence to learn (and it *definitely* is) the confidence boost in my flying I got from getting my licence gave me the confidence to say in situations like that "I know I can do this, I passed a skills test showing I can do this, so just get it together Darky, ok?". Don't read that as overconfidence, because I am definitely not overconfident about my flying, but just that confidence inside that I've landed lots of times before so I just need to get it together and do it again.

Well done Darky on having the guts to go around.

 

I think a lot of pilots stick with it until it is far to late because they do not want to admit there not quite with it or they just really want to be on the ground again.

 

Think you make a brilliant pilot, and well deserving of the license because of it. I would fly with you any day.

 

 

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wow great stuff guys, I have a feeling next lesson is going to be much different! But, i won't be shocked or surprised if it isn't! I have often been accused of needing to get out of my head on things, this is just another example I guess!

 

 

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Don't worry about it mate - if you're trying hard and concerned about how well you are doing then you should do okay.

 

I am about to get my PPL on minimum time and have also had a few frustrating flights - don't dwell on them and instead think of what you can do better next time. Just brush it off and get on with it and you'll do fine.

 

On going around etc, its nothing to be ashamed of. As above, its a good mindset to have - if you are at any stage uncomfortable with an aspect of the flight, make steps to remedy it. This holds true whether it be weather limiting visibility, your descent being too fast or approach unsuitable for a safe landing.

 

Cheers - boingk

 

 

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re: landings try not to think about actually landing and don't assume you will actually land. Just plan to fly along the runway in the landing attitude. When I do this I make my best landings.

 

As far as spending your dollar while flying, you hit the nail on the head when you mentioned your bike riding. I too ride bikes and it all comes very naturally. If you persist with flying you'll most likely end up with the same feeling. Eventually it all comes naturally and you can just enjoy the flying.

 

In my opinion the best times inn flying come when learning, keep learning and you'll never get bored with it.

 

 

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