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I'm going to be fitting a 10 US Gallon Fibreglass fuel tank to the Buzzard trike (95.10 Rego) I rebuilt a few years back as an upgrade from the existing 5 US Gallon fuel tank.

 

http://www.recreationalflying.com/threads/buzzard-trike-restoration.6709/

 

The existing 5 Gallon tank is a standard Quicksilver XL tank and the new tank is marketed as an upgrade for it.

 

I know people have concerns about fibreglass tanks and my specific question in this thread is whether I should coat the inside of the tank with some substance to prevent fine fibreglass particles getting into the downstream fuel system, and if so, what should I coat it with?

 

Cheers,

 

Glen

 

 

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Thanks FT,

 

I looked through the first few pages of this section of the forums before starting this thread but I suppose it was a few more pages back.

 

I just noticed the website of the USA vendor I bought it from says this about their fibreglass tanks, "Internal walls of our tanks are coated with the same compound commonly used in the marine industry". I guess I'll have to ask them what that is.

 

Cheers,

 

Glen

 

 

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Just to add my tuppence worth...

 

Beware of any promises by fibreglass manufacturers. I found a great article in usboating magazine, which told of the problems associated with 'fibreglass'. Normal polyester resin leaves styrene molecules available (within the layup) for ethanol to collect and convey through the engine with disasterous results. Then they tested the best 'ethanol resistant' epoxy resing and found that when they immersed test strips of laminate in E10 (10% ethanol mogas) the test strips lost significant strength over a three month period. That resin is similar to the epoxy based tank wash sealants available. So my assumption is that fibreglass is a highly suspect material for fuel tank construction. My Lightwing tanks developed pinhole leaks through the sides. Although that was after 10 years, it still makes me wonder...

 

PEter T

 

 

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l will be using plastic fuel cells, light, foam filled, all the fittings, certified for ALL fuels but are basicaly boxs.

 

So if you can fit a box in maybe they could be the go.

 

Cant get any safer.

 

regards Bruce

 

 

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Guest Maj Millard

E10 has and can cause problems with a lot of different materials that may not be resistant. Recently for example a Saphire with a composit fuel tank molded into the seat developed a significent leak whilst parked on the ground at Natfly. Pilot noted that it could have been way more exciting if the leak had occured whilst airborne !! A large quantity of fuel ended up on the cabin floor, just the fumes alone could have caused dramas.................Maj...024_cool.gif.7a88a3168ebd868f5549631161e2b369.gif

 

 

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FGI of Brookvale supplied my tank resin (vinyl ester) which their chemical engineer assures me is tolerant of both petrol and ethanol. My tanks have been full of various types of petrol for several years. I am currently stripping the wing, so will remove these tanks and thoroughly test them.

 

 

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