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Just wondering if other's have good acronyms they use when flying?

 

For example I use CGUMPS which I know is pretty common. I trained in a c152 so the acronym goes as follows (for those that don't know it) for a landing sequence.

 

C - carb heat on

 

G - gas on

 

U - undercarriage (for me it's just welded)

 

M - mixture full rich mixture

 

P - power. Pull back to your appropriate Level

 

S - switches. Check the panel and flaps when in green.

 

Anyone have any other good ones?

 

 

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I use pre takeoff checks as follows:

 

TMPFFIHC

 

T - Trim set.

 

M - Micture Rich.

 

P - Pitch fine.

 

F - Flaps set as required.

 

F - Fuel. Contents, correct tank, Pressure, Primer locked Pump on, Pressure ok.

 

I - Instrument scan (adjust DI), Temps n Pressures ok.

 

H - Hatches and Harness secure.

 

C - Controls full, free and in correct sense.

 

I use pre landing checks as follows:

 

BUMPFH

 

B - Brakes check for pressure and off.

 

U - Undercarriage down and correct indications for locked

 

M - Mixture rich, Ignition on both.

 

P - Pitch fine

 

F - Fuel Qty, Correct tank, pump on pressure ok.

 

H - Hatches and Harnesses.

 

Short final check

 

PUF

 

P - Pitch

 

U - Undercarriage

 

F - Flaps

 

Cheers

 

 

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CFMOST for engine restart checklist after failure

 

C - Carby Heat (hot)

 

F - Fuel - pumps on, sufficient fuel remaining, select different tank, etc.

 

M - Mixture (cycle through, then leave partway in/out can't remember right now)

 

O - Oil (temp and pressure) - to me this one is dumb - if your engine stops, pressure would be low/zero anyway. Temp would be decreasing. but in any case, what could you do about it anyway, get out and add more?

 

S - Switches - cycle through the magnetos to see if maybe one is bad

 

T - Throttle

 

WOSSS for field selection in forced landing

 

W - wind - determine direction

 

O - obstacles - trees, power lines, ferris wheels

 

S - surface - not full of rocks and divots, preferably smooth and hard enough, medium level grass is good to help slow down

 

S - slope - uphill or no slope preferrably

 

S - surrounds - what is around to help ID where you are, where a phone or help might be, etc.

 

Mike's one above, I learned as BUMFISH - downwind checklist

 

B - brakes working, and not set

 

U - undercarriage

 

M - mixture rich

 

F - fuel - pump on and sufficient quantity for go around or whatever

 

I - instruments - temp/pressure in green, quick scan to make sure they are all working, no cracked glass on the vacuum ones for ex.

 

S - switches - landing lights or other as appropriate

 

H - hatches, harnesses

 

 

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There is a standard one however I used my own version of "McDonalds" i.e. Two all-beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions - all on a sesame seed bun

 

Two all-beef patties - Hatches and Harness (2 pax)

 

special sauce - Oil

 

lettuce - Temp (Lettuce is 99% water)

 

cheese - Brakes

 

pickles - Carby Heat

 

onions - Fuel

 

all on a sesame seed bun - Undercarriage

 

I just simply found the connection to the Big Mac was for some reason easy for me to relate to so the point is...find one that you are really comfortable with and seems to to simply slip off the tongue

 

 

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Wow, so we can see that these really are all over the place.

 

So here's a question for you who have actually received your ticket - when you are doing your flight test, do you get dinged on if you don't go through each item as you learned it? For example, do i have to call out "undercarriage" and "mixture" even though the Jab has neither of those, just to call out that I am aware of them?

 

 

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Since we're a bit off topic...

 

In the Emergency Rooms at hospitals:

 

NFI = Needs Further Investigation, or the alternative, No "Flaming" Idea

 

PAFO = "Plastered" And Fell Over

 

GOMER = "Get Out of My Emergency Room"

 

Back to topic............

 

 

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One from my days doing CAA Flight Rules and Procedures (edit - boring as ....), bit of a story involved.

 

Anyone that has done FRP through a flying school would be aware that it usually takes several weeks of 2 hr talks to a small class of students to complete. We had one absolute ripper of a lecturer doing our course.

 

The usual information was passed in during the course of the talks, but the lecturer always had this little equation in the top right corner of the whiteboard which he kept wiping every time he cleaned the board off, then re-writing prior to filling the rest of the whiteboard with the next topic, without so much as mentioning what the equation meant.

 

As you would expect as the weeks rolled on we were all getting quite curious as the the relevance of this equation and how it related to FRP.

 

The equation of interest was:

 

"1/2A = RTFQ"

 

On the very last day of the course he finally came to that little equation and he stated that this will be the equation that gives you your FRP pass mark. He then said what it meant:

 

"Half the answer equals read the Full question" (or words to that effect).

 

Never forgotten......

 

 

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I'm pretty hopeless at remembering how to spell words, so using words to help remember things is a recipe for disaster, for myself at least.

 

I like the left to right check - as it's practical.. I do however use BUMF: Brakes, Undercarriage Mixture, Fuel, for a pre-landing check, and Red Blue Green for finals.

 

Pre take off is "Crazy Man Flying" - Controls, Mixture, Fuel.

 

 

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Guest Howard Hughes

All these acronyms?

 

It is important not to confuse your TLA's (Ten Letter Abbreviations), with your TLA's (Three Letter Abbreviations) and TLA's (Two Letter Abbreviations)!022_wink.gif.2137519eeebfc3acb3315da062b6b1c1.gif

 

 

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I use.....

 

FETCH Pre-takeoff

 

FETCH Down wind

 

HASEL Airwork

 

SSWASS Outlanding

 

CLEAROFF Navigation enroute

 

But then I fly a very simple little aircraft, the Thruster

 

Pud

 

 

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I used the aircraft check list pre take off. If one isnt availiable, I use the standard one .Kick the tyre and light the fire.

 

On down wind I used

 

B- I hope I didnt break the brakes

 

U- undercarriage ( is it still there) -I dont fly retract

 

M-Mixture - I hope I dont have to much air in the carby

 

F-Fuel - I hope I have more than 1 minute left as I have 2 minutes to run until landing.045_beg.gif.b05ea876053438dae8f282faacd973d1.gif

 

I - Indicators/instruments-I wonder what that instrument indicates 033_scratching_head.gif.b541836ec2811b6655a8e435f4c1b53a.gif

 

S- Switches I Hope that one I broke earlier still works

 

Harness & hatches- Harness-Oops, the harness it is still flapping in the breeze, where I shut the door on it.augie.gif.8d680d8e3ee1cb0d5cda5fa6ccce3b35.gif

 

What EVER YOU DO - DONT use the "What does this button do " check list That could end in tears.020_yes.gif.58d361886eb042a872e78a875908e414.gif

 

 

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Guest Howard Hughes
CLEAROFF Navigation enroute

But then I fly a very simple little aircraft, the Thruster

 

Pud

Many years ago in the US, I was taught TTTTT (Time Turn Twist Throttle Talk)!

Works for me, as I also fly a very simple aircraft!

 

 

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For pre-takeoff I like CIGARS:

 

Controls - full and free

 

Instruments - Alt set, temps and pressures green or coming up

 

Gas - Fuel sufficient, fullest tank or both, pump on, pressure good.

 

Airframe (or Attitude) - Flaps and trim set for take-off

 

Runups

 

Security - hatches and harnesses secure.

 

 

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FESAPA is the downwind check I was taught:

 

F - Fuel pump on & sufficient for go-around, mixture rich

 

E - Engine temps & pressures

 

S - Switches - landing lights

 

A - Airframe - flaps, brakes

 

P - Pilot & Passengers - seat belts, loose articles, brief

 

A - Airport - runways clear and landing into wind

 

 

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Just a matter of either picking one that works for you or making one up for yourself (like the macca's version). I remember my the sentence I made up to remember the planets to this day: "My Very Early Mother And Jockey Sat UnderNeath Uranus". No idea why it works - it's absolute nonsense - but it does for some reason...

 

 

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Just a matter of either picking one that works for you or making one up for yourself (like the macca's version). I remember my the sentence I made up to remember the planets to this day: "My Very Early Mother And Jockey Sat UnderNeath Uranus". No idea why it works - it's absolute nonsense - but it does for some reason...

Pity about the last planet... 042_hide.gif.f5e8fb1d85d95ffa63d9b5a325bf422e.gif 001_smile.gif.2cb759f06c4678ed4757932a99c02fa0.gif

But yes, use a mnemonic or action that you can remember, it's not much use if you can't remember what the letters stand for. For downwind I don't use one, I trace a path through the cockpit with my hand checking things as my hand passes them. That's just me.

 

 

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This beautiful Thunderbolt made it's first post restoration flights earlier this year in the UK.

 

I was amazed how many guys on one of the warbirds forums did not know what SNAFU stands for!

 

 

 

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