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Hey just seeing what everyone uses for a CTAF radio call format, and also do you tend to make the whole recitation for each event, or just the full thing on first call then abbreviated after? The Sydney VFG spells out when you have to make the calls, and gives examples, but stops short of providing a template... just curious to see what everyone says.

 

 

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Ahhh so this kinda answers the second part of the question:

 

The AIP no longer defines any mandatory or recommended broadcasts such as 'turning downwind', 'turning base', 'turning final' or 'clear of runway'. Instead CAR 166C states: 'The pilot must make a broadcast ... whenever it is reasonably necessary to do so to avoid a collision, or the risk of a collision, with another aircraft ...'

So basically make the mandatory inbounds or taxi/enter runway calls, then the others one an probably abbreviate rather than go with the full template on each movement (or leave out if workload is high or there is no other traffic).

 

 

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Guest Howard Hughes

I've said this before, but nearly all radio calls require similar information (even those in CTA). As a guide I laways use:

 

- Who you are

 

- Where you are

 

- Where you are going

 

- And how you intend to get there

 

These are the main requirements for every radio call that you can make, in a logical sequence:wink:

 

 

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I stick with, Any one in QLD, I'ma flying 'n' you better not go a runnin into me!

 

No I really second what Howard Hughes has said. There are a lot of people who get their nickers in a knot about if you should say "Traffic Location" or "Location trafic". They nearly pass out if you have been flying a while and occasionally let slip the ominous "All Stations"!!!!! Rules are rules and I know there put in place for a reason, and in regards to the radio for practical standardisation of communications between aircraft.

 

But the real point of using the push to talk is to convey important information about what your movements are to maintain separation with other aircraft, not to sound like a bloody fighter who has no personality at all!!!

 

- Who you are

 

- Where you are

 

- Where you are going

 

- And how you intend to get there

 

Hits the nail on the head for me.

 

 

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As I see it the rules are simple and simpler than they used to be. If you can't work out what you should be saying, then I wonder if you should be flying at all.

 

 

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As I see it the rules are simple and simpler than they used to be. If you can't work out what you should be saying, then I wonder if you should be flying at all.

I'm not suggest it's hard to say the correct thing, I am just amazed how many people get totally bent out of shape for using the barely wrong, not 100% technically correct phrases.

 

 

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Well said guys. Standard calls for me are like the following:

 

"Goulburn traffic, Minicab 0825 entering and lining up runway 22. Goulburn traffic."

 

"Goulburn traffic, Minicab 0825 depart runway 22 for Crookwell, heading 297 degrees magnetic, on climb to 5000ft currently passing through 2500ft. Goulburn traffic."

 

"Bathurst traffic, Cessna 150 WXR approximately 10 nautical miles to the South of aerodrome, inbound at XXXXft on descent to XXXXft. Expected arrival in circuit UTC XX. Bathurst traffic."

 

"Minicab 0825 to Plane XXXX, currently in circuit and advise local conditions favouring runway 22 with moderate crosswind. Cloudbase 5000ft with nil precipitation, cannot advise of current weather beyond local area. Use caution on flight to Maruya as cloudbase appears close to mountain saddle, with tops in cloud. Would advise against. Minicab 0825"

 

In all cases, except for last, I clearly state who I am, what I'm doing and what I will do. In the last I state who I am, where I am, and my advice on current conditions... as far as I am able to advise. I would not give further advice as I would not be in a position to do so - I was not expecting to head into Maruya that day and did not have a printed report with me. I could see the range you need to cross en route and advised on that.

 

As long as you stick to the basics of who you are, where you are and what you're doing then you shouldn't go too far wrong.

 

Cheers - boingk

 

 

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Who, What, Where, Why When and How.

 

Used in journalism but just as easy to remember for this purpose. Covers everything, some information may be edited down.

 

Who you are and your audience is, what you intend to do, where you intend to do it, why you intend to do it (daylight, fuel, weather, panpan or other emergency? may be left out for routine communication), when you intend to do it (ETA, departure, action) and how you intend to do it (runway).

 

 

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Short, sweet and to the point... 001_smile.gif.2cb759f06c4678ed4757932a99c02fa0.gif

 

Who you're calling, who you are, where you are, what you're going to do.

 

 

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thanks guys! mostly just wanted to know whether it is necessary to go through the whole litany for every turn... sounds like once I go through the who, what, when, where, why for the mandatories, I can shorten the rest, ie "7295, turning base"

 

 

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Guest Crezzi
I'm not suggest it's hard to say the correct thing, I am just amazed how many people get totally bent out of shape for using the barely wrong, not 100% technically correct phrases.

Try having to listen to them all day, every day 067_bash.gif.26fb8516c20ce4d7842b820ac15914cf.gif

 

More seriously a transmission might contain all the correct information but if its not in the correct format it adds to the workload of decoding and interpreting it (especially for students / low-hour pilots).

 

Cheers

 

John

 

 

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I'm not suggest it's hard to say the correct thing, I am just amazed how many people get totally bent out of shape for using the barely wrong, not 100% technically correct phrases.

I frequently fly onboard with maintenance test pilots ( on intercom), even they don't get it 100% correct, 100% of the time, even the instructors with military students including ATC. In fact errors are quite frequent. They are however, quite relaxed about it, will correct themselves, and will query others if they have any doubt about the transmission.

 

 

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Exactly - if you notice an error correct it.

 

The other day I was landing on 26 at Goulburn and incorrectly made a call indicating I was on downwind for 22. Immediately after the call I made another stating "Correction, turning downwind for runway 26."

 

- boingk

 

 

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I've gotten tuned up over the radio for making too many calls by an annonymous station. I was making ALL calls at a non radio mandatory airstrip. I still make all calls.

 

I also generally say "traffic location" rather then "location traffic", primarily due to the close proximity of a few other airstrips, and if you clip your transmission a bit, all other monitoring the ctaf will hear is "traffic".

 

I hear a lot of pilots, and I use that name loosely, who do not abide by ANY standard radio syntax, and are flat out getting their call sign right. And not just raaus.

 

On that note, I do make mistakes as well. Just some professionalism is needed.

 

 

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I also generally say "traffic location" rather then "location traffic", primarily due to the close proximity of a few other airstrips, and if you clip your transmission a bit, all other monitoring the ctaf will hear is "traffic".

It also allows time to stop whatever else you are doing and start consentrating on what is being broadcast, especially if you are talking to your pax
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I also generally say "traffic location" rather then "location traffic", primarily due to the close proximity of a few other airstrips, and if you clip your transmission a bit, all other monitoring the ctaf will hear is "traffic".

Right there with you on that one, especially on 126.7 where you will hear calls from numerous locations in some areas.

 

Another one I have heard lots is " Hervey Bay - Maryborough CTAF Aircraft ABC blah blah blah blah". These 2 airfields share a Ctaf frequency due to their proximity but if the call does not specify which one they are at, you are left to work out where they are based on what runway # they refer to ( if the call even refers to a #, ie an inbound call ).

 

 

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Guest Howard Hughes
thanks guys! mostly just wanted to know whether it is necessary to go through the whole litany for every turn... sounds like once I go through the who, what, when, where, why for the mandatories, I can shorten the rest, ie "7295, turning base"

"7295 Turning base runway 26, touch and go"

Although you may have been doing circuits for some time, others will still be popping up on the frequency and will need to know your intentions!

 

 

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dont forget, its "traffic" first and last. eg, Traffic Wollongong Savannah XXXX turning downwind runway 16 wollongong traffic.

 

aparently according to CASA, its so that if you clip the call, you still get the location out.

 

 

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dont forget, its "traffic" first and last. eg, Traffic Wollongong Savannah XXXX turning downwind runway 16 wollongong traffic.aparently according to CASA, its so that if you clip the call, you still get the location out.

Broadcast phraseology as per regs eg CAR166 is:

 

(Location) Traffic

 

(Aircraft Type)

 

(Call sign)

 

(Position/Intentions)

 

(Location)

 

 

Rare to hear the RPT at YHBA to phrase exactly as above. However, I don't care as long as the important bits are there and you know what everybody's intentions are.

 

Nev

 

 

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Broadcast phraseology as per regs eg CAR166 is:(Location) Traffic

 

(Aircraft Type)

 

(Call sign)

 

(Position/Intentions)

 

(Location)

 

Rare to hear the RPT at YHBA to phrase exactly as above. However, I don't care as long as the important bits are there and you know what everybody's intentions are.

 

Nev

Bingo - thats exactly what was being taught this year to me during my initial flight training for Commercial, since abandoned.

 

Also bingo on the not caring as long as the important bits are there.

 

Cheers - boingk

 

 

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I know what the regs are however Traffic first in my opinion is much better for the reasons mentioned above, we used to say All Stations XXXX for that very reason, I just cannot understand the reason for the change.

 

Alan.

 

 

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Just never, ever, ever make a call in the third person (such as saying Drifter XXXX "turns" base instead of "turning" base).

 

It's not against the regulations but it should be! ace.gif.4b7b2ce3e9d614e05873a978e6555c1d.gif075_amazon.gif.0882093f126abdba732f442cccc04585.gifsee_no_evil.gif.405888ff9078f30e1e55f7c227388916.gif001_smile.gif.2cb759f06c4678ed4757932a99c02fa0.gif

 

 

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