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Prepping for a loooong cross country....


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Hi again guys,

 

My 582 to 912 conversion has gone so well that I'm contemplating flying my drifter from my home in New Mexico to Oshkosh Airventure. It's over 1000 NM each way. Happens in late July. As long as I get another 20 or so test hours between now and then, I'm at least gonna try it. I've already got 20 hours on the bird since the 912 conversion was completed.

 

So, in preparation, I'm planning to fit my aux belly tank. Since I'm also installing a fuel level sender in the main 8 gal tank, I'm planning on mounting a small solid state 12v pump to the belly tank, and only plumbing it to the main tank. As the main tank gets low, I'll refill with the transfer tank. Does that sound like a bad idea ?

 

I figure it's best not to rely on the engine driven pump to lift the fuel any higher than it already does...

 

 

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I could have assisted last week with more test hours, I was looking for something to do on the weekend whilst working in Alburqueque, one can only unload so many rounds in an M4 on full auto, a few 9mm's and a 45 before boredom sets in and I was wanting to find an excuse for a drive in the 2013 Mustang 5.0.... (by the way, traction control is incredible, don't try to drive one without it turned on)

 

 

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I could have assisted last week with more test hours, I was looking for something to do on the weekend whilst working in Alburqueque, one can only unload so many rounds in an M4 on full auto, a few 9mm's and a 45 before boredom sets in and I was wanting to find an excuse for a drive in the 2013 Mustang 5.0.... (by the way, traction control is incredible, don't try to drive one without it turned on)

Interesting job you have there!

 

 

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Justin most 582 drifters here lift the fuel from the belly tank with no problems. Had a 503 with the same set up as your proposal. And i found i became parinoid on a long trip that the fuel was being pumped into the top tank. Unless you have a gauge connected to the back tank, it could be a worry. Love the idea of converting to a 912 would consider it if i was a bit more mechanicaly minded

 

Have a great trip and do put some photos on site

 

 

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I could have assisted last week with more test hours, I was looking for something to do on the weekend whilst working in Alburqueque, one can only unload so many rounds in an M4 on full auto, a few 9mm's and a 45 before boredom sets in and I was wanting to find an excuse for a drive in the 2013 Mustang 5.0.... (by the way, traction control is incredible, don't try to drive one without it turned on)

You have way to good a job Matt, but then again you're a walking brain with serious ability so It doesn't surprise me!

 

 

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With an auxiliary tank that relies on a fuel pump driven by electricity. It's normal to plan to use that first, as you are not sure of it being available. If the supply fails, then you can return on the main tank, which should be a more reliable supply and a larger quantity.. If you have available intermediate landing points then you have more options, but then your fuel was never critical. Nev

 

 

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As the main tank gets low, I'll refill with the transfer tank. Does that sound like a bad idea ? I figure it's best not to rely on the engine driven pump to lift the fuel any higher than it already does...

Hi Justin, I`ve had the original "Austflight Aviation" belly tank, on my WB Drifter for almost 30 years. I have never liked the idea of having ( Nor have I ever had ) the fuel line to the carbies coming from the top tank and pumping fuel from the belly tank to the top tank, reason being, if for whatever reason the electric pump was to fail in flight, you could have the belly tank full of fuel but no way of getting it to the engine.

 

I set my system up this way! My top tank gravity feeds into the belly tank. The fuel line to the engine comes from the belly tank. I have an electric pump close to the belly tank,then half way along the fuel line I have a squeeze bulb, then up to the standard Rotax vacuum pump and finaly into the carbies.

 

I use the electric pump to prime the carbies before starting the engine, leaving it on for take-off. Once I reach a safe altitude I switch the pump off and leave it off.

 

I`ve had 4 Rotax 582, all of which did over 600 hrs and my current 503 which has done 365 hrs and in all the years and flight hours that I`ve had my fuel system set up this way, never once have I had the slightest problem. I don`t put fuel in the top tank at all unless I need the extra fuel. It`s much easier putting fuel into the belly tank.

 

Frank. 002_wave.gif.62d5c7a07e46b2ae47f4cd2e61a0c301.gif

 

 

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Hi Justin,

 

That is a pretty standard set up for them. You should get about 11l p/h (maybe better) out of the 912, planning 13 will give you two hours plus reserve in the top tank before transfer. I just did a 1300nm round trip in one and never had to transfer in flight, which I do not trust with out confirmation of fuel level in top tank... which you will have anyway. 2 hours is enough airtime before a rest stop hurry_up.gif.177b070ad0fed9378055f023fbf484f7.gif

 

I also had my 582 SB set up to draw from the bottom tank like Frank and preferred that for the 582 (using much more fuel) with boost for take off landing or over bad terrain BUT I did have an incident when the bottom tank was holed by a large rock kicking off the wheel and hitting right on the retention strap. If I had not seen the fuel spray on clearing my turn after take off I would have lost ALL fuel not long after: I landed with out incident back at point of departure. Just pointing out possible pro/cons. What you propose is good.

 

 

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PS Reading that forum posts... don't be concerned if you do have to use AVGAS somewhere... or of mixing MOGAS with AVGAS when required.

 

 

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I did have an incident when the bottom tank was holed by a large rock kicking off the wheel and hitting right on the retention strap. If I had not seen the fuel spray on clearing my turn after take off I would have lost ALL fuel not long after: I landed with out incident back at point of departure. Just pointing out possible pro/cons. What you propose is good.

Bugger!.... Another lesson for everyone out there. Goodonya Tex.

 

Frank.

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well, since I've got a fuel level indicator on the EMS, I think I'm gonna go with a transfer pump. It doesn't weigh much more, just a few ounces. It's just that if I'm gonna be aloft for long periods, I'd like to know for sure how much fuel is in the tank that I'm using....If the pump fails, I'll have plenty of time to find a spot.

 

Anyway, I've been flying the drifter as much as possible, and doing longer and longer flights....Flew it to Monument Valley not long ago. Only 216 miles or so, round trip. I think on the long trip to Oshkosh I could easily do 400 - 450 miles a day, assuming good weather (I know, a big assumption)

 

A link to the pictures / info of the trip...

 

http://www.shutterflightphotography.com/drifting-to-monument-valley/

 

 

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450 is a big day without tail winds in a Drifter. Yes easily doable but having done a few trips here of that distance it can easily end up being more than you want to commit too . I prefer to plan about the 360... even with moderate head winds you should be able to that comfortably - IMHO it makes for more enjoyable flying not fighting the clock the whole time. Bit envious here.... 014_spot_on.gif.1f3bdf64e5eb969e67a583c9d350cd1f.gif

 

 

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That would be my plan too! Plenty of time to for refueling, a good stretch and scratch and to answer the questions of the inquiring hoards at all stops; still with plenty of time to enjoy the flying and views.

 

 

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Very sound advice from Tex, he is truly a Drifter-file, I recently did a trip here in Aus from Adelaide to Avalon for the air show. I have a 582, I have just a 65 litre tank but supplement that with 40 litres on the backseat, a 12 volt low pressure pump that transfers the fuel through its own filter to the main tank where the engine draws fuel from. I have two system to confirm fuel level prior to transfer, a fuel guage with a mark at 20 litres so there is plenty of room for the 40 L to go and a mirror and a sight line on the side of the main tank. Confirm there is enough room and then transfer, takes about 18 minutes and I'm goog, gives me 105 L of total fuel on board. If the fuel transfer fails either before or during, I'll have a minimum of 45 minutes to find an alternate landing area to resolve the issue. I found 4 - 5 hours at one time is heaps of flying, maybe do 3 in the morning and 3 in the afternoon, remember to hydrate and keep your food intake light but often. If you have too a bit of Avgas is ok, I have done it once or twice just costs a lot more.

 

 

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