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I am interested in the new prop now available for the 2200 engine. Price is $1800 plus freight. Does anyone have any experience with these props? Are they worth the extra cost above that of the Timber prop? Jabiru say an extra 7 to 10 knots at 2800 revs. Any help or advice greatly appreciated.

 

 

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I have been running a very similar one - different hub, and confirm they work well

 

Numbers seem about right, little optimistic maybe

 

Sure is a big upgrade on wood versions. I had very limited sucess with these

 

 

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I have been running a very similar one - different hub, and confirm they work wellNumbers seem about right, little optimistic maybe

Sure is a big upgrade on wood versions. I had very limited sucess with these

Done 430 hours with the original 230 prop. It has some stone scars near the tips. I was thinking seriously of replacing. Looking forward to hearing results before spending mega bucks.

 

Feed back appreciated

 

Phil

 

.

 

 

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Be sure they keep both blades connected at the original distance Even the composite "Sensenich" displayed flaking near the hub and they are a good brand. the wooden prop is the safest thing for a Jab. Nev.

 

 

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Talked to my LAME Mick during the week and he advised me to stay with the wooden prop for now. I will take his advice. He hasn't steered me wrong with anything in the past. Besides the finance officer wasn't impressed at $1800.

 

 

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The prop is made by Bolly. Having used Bolly props on a number of TECNAM aircraft I cannot speak more highly of their smoothness, performance and durability. Small stone damage is non existant and erosion of the leading edge in rain experienced with wooden props is history. I strongly recommend a professional prop balance when changing any prop.

 

This new prop will be a win,win for JABIRU owners.

 

 

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From a chance conversation, I was told a new wooden Jab prop is $1600, so if the new prop is required (rather than just an interesting experiment), there isn't much cost difference.

 

dodo

 

 

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Why is it that in the magazine there is an ad for Bolly with a 2 blade prop costing $700 and something dollars but the Jabiru version is $1800? I don't get it.

 

 

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Most likely not the same thing?

 

Bolly 2 blade to suit Jab is the similar price but runs different hub

 

Jabirus is much larger and looks good

 

 

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All engines have different characteristics with prop torsional vibrations. It's a known fact that the safest prop is a wooden one on the Jabiru. IF you lose a prop blade you will know about it. Nev

 

 

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Agreed facthunter

 

Big difference between Jab 4 and 6 though

 

No composite prop failures on 6 cyl ive heard of, common on 4 cyl, however Jabiru have put lots of testing into this and hub is huge compared to others

 

 

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Some of you blokes worry me. To get on a forum and make statements about products which you've had no research involvement in and state it with such authority. Jabiru states the prop is not the same composition as Bolly for obvious reasons (pulsing) and they have done their research. The last thing any manufacturer wants is to fight a litigation case relating to a death due to the failure of their product. We must also be careful of conflict of interest information that some people hand out quite freely.....Frosty.

 

 

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I was asking because the Jab prop is apparently made by Bolly hence the confusion. I have a friend who bought a new jabbie wooden prop and also had his old prop restored at the same time - less than half the price and it looks/performs every bit as good as the new one. He's using the restored one while the new one is his spare.

 

 

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There is certainly nothing special about the jabiru prop. You could make one better, which is fine as long as it is a simple wooden two blade prop of conventional design. Nev

 

 

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Frosty - Fact is Bolly make a very nice composite prop in 2 and 3 blade configuration and have done for some years specifically for higher output engines. Bolly too spent lots of time testing and researching props and developing thiers. I dont believe they sell a 2200 4 cyl version though after some problems years ago.

 

They are producing blades to Jabiru spec. I dont think anyone mentioned they are the same but they are very similar.

 

For the 3300 carbon fibre composite props have proven no problem and some have run these CF props for hundreds of hours. I have tried 4 types and the 2B Bolly is by far the best and done ~ 150hrs now

 

The 2200 has proven a problem for many prop makers and for Jabiru to release a composite version to suit this engine they had better done a lot of testing as there are a number of in flight failures of composite props on this 4 cyl engine.

 

Bolly makes props for all sorts of uses and prices vary

 

New composite prop from Jabiru is only slightly dearer than new wooden Im told.

 

In my experience composites dont require rebuild etc and a spare is pretty much not needed. Unlike wood! 3 replacements in 12 mths!

 

 

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Jetjr - I'm aware of all above and how Steve nearly lost the front of his plane testing the Bolly on the 2.2 engine. Some wood props are not suited for the 2.2 as they're too dense, heavy and don't flex enough to dampen out the pulsing. I would like to think Jabiru have taken all this into consideration with their composite for the 2.2 and I'm aware they've done many hours of testing.

 

No mater what we stick our bum in we take it for granted the manufacturer have done their homework and the product is safe.

 

We can only hope this is the case with the above mentioned prop. .....Frosty

 

 

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  • 1 month later...
Jetjr - I'm aware of all above and how Steve nearly lost the front of his plane testing the Bolly on the 2.2 engine. Some wood props are not suited for the 2.2 as they're too dense, heavy and don't flex enough to dampen out the pulsing. I would like to think Jabiru have taken all this into consideration with their composite for the 2.2 and I'm aware they've done many hours of testing.No mater what we stick our bum in we take it for granted the manufacturer have done their homework and the product is safe.

We can only hope this is the case with the above mentioned prop. .....Frosty

Hi frosty,

Installed my new composite prop on the 230 last week.

 

The extra performance is noticeable, climb, smoothness and quieter than the wooden one.

 

I bought mainly for less stone chipping and rain damage. I reckon about an extra 4 or 5 Knots.

 

I would reccomend at this early stage.

 

I did my BFR yesterday and the CFI said that it ran a lot smoother than the club 230. My wooden prop with spimmer and all parts is for sale if anyone is interested.

 

Phil

 

 

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Hi Phil

 

Good to hear. Hope you have a good run with the prop. I'd like to hear feed back from someone out there using the new prop

 

on a 120. Have to get back your way before I hang up my wings. Your flyin was a beauty.

 

Frosty.

 

 

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  • 1 year later...
Hi frosty,Installed my new composite prop on the 230 last week.

The extra performance is noticeable, climb, smoothness and quieter than the wooden one.

 

I bought mainly for less stone chipping and rain damage. I reckon about an extra 4 or 5 Knots.

 

I would reccomend at this early stage.

 

I did my BFR yesterday and the CFI said that it ran a lot smoother than the club 230. My wooden prop with spimmer and all parts is for sale if anyone is interested.

 

Phil

Hi Phil,

 

Just checking up if the composite prop is still serving you well on your J230. Was considering an upgrade in the near future.

 

Kind Regards,

 

Ryan

 

 

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Hi Ryan,

 

We have put total 550 hours on 2 of these props - and they are v good; makes for smoother running and about 3 - 5 knot gain.. More resilient to rain and wont take up moisture in humid conditions..

 

Cheers

 

Chris

 

 

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Hi Phil,Just checking up if the composite prop is still serving you well on your J230. Was considering an upgrade in the near future.

 

Kind Regards,

 

Ryan

Hi Ryan,

 

Fully agree with Chris' comments.

 

I have only done about 60 hours with mine but I cannot fault it.

 

A flying buddy bought one for his J160 a while back, swears by it.

 

Highly recommend.

 

PHIL.

 

 

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It is easy to believe that a composite prop will have more performance. But how can it be as kind to the crankshaft as the wooden one?

 

Wood is soft stuff in comparison with carbon-epoxy. Now the power of a direct-connect engine comes in pulses. For the 4 cylinder engine, there are 4 pulses of 45 degrees every 720 degrees, which means power is applied to the prop 25% of the time and the rest of the time power is applied to the engine from the prop. A hard prop must put more load on the crankshaft than a soft one as it accelerates and decelerates.

 

Now I am sure that the factory are well aware of this and they are confident the crankshaft is strong enough for the composite props, after all there are plenty of METAL props on Cessnas etc. But I'm going to stick to my old wooden prop for a bit longer.

 

... Bruce

 

 

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Even certified metal props need inspection, constantly. There must be RPM settings to avoid. What are they? I'm sure they would vary with different props. I was disappointed to see the composite Sensenich do funny things near the hub. Wood is definately SAFER. On some aircraft where the metal and wood props are both used, I always felt the wooden ones were a "softer" feel. Hard to quantify but definitely easier on the crank.. The metal prop on the 10 MK 11 (Chipmunk engine) Fairey Reed, is very prone to cracking. Chuck a blade and the motor comes out rapidly. Nev

 

 

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