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How Not To Drop Skydivers


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This one has enjoyed a restricted circulation locally, however for those who haven't seen it - a jump pilot makes a dogs breakfast of a drop and then compounds the error by not recovering from the resulting spin asap. Gives me the shivers! Quite a bit going on here, incorrect control application, rearward C of G, modified aircraft ......

 

 

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Guest avi8tr

I'm a bit confused by the video. It doesn't look as though the pilots are making any attempts to stop the spin. Seems like it's very deliberate but seems crazy to be jumping out under such circumstances.

 

If you've dropped skydivers you would know that they do all sorts of things that upset the aircraft. Hanging off the back, holding on until the last minute, climbing out up and onto the roof, crazy stuff, so I'm not surprised that they could inadvertently spin.

 

 

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Guest Chris Spencer-Scarr

Sorry Spin, but I'm inclined to disagree with your summary.

 

The aircraft is a turbine powered ex military aircraft (C4m-Kudu) originally called a Kudu, now referred to as an "Atlas Angel'.

 

You can clearly see the pilots holding the aircraft in a spin with the stick aft (see the elevator) and the yoke pro roll. They would probably have been in Beta (reverse thrust) to slow the descent down to the same speed as the open canopies.

 

This entire event was filmed from both inside and outside to make this clip.

 

The spin was intentional and not resultant.

 

I could quite easily track the pilots if you wish.

 

 

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Might be interesting to do so Chris, I know they have resolutely avoided commenting on the video during its previous airings, whereas the jumpmaster who has quite a bit do with the Angel project in general, offered the observation that it was "it was kind of 'interesting'...

 

One of those combination of f*ckup things when all the holes line up"

 

I originally put it down as an ill conceived stunt for the cameras, noting the apparent pro spin controls as well, but unless they were engaged in a frantic cover up once CAA took an interest, I'm not so sure now that it wasn't a case of beta thrust masking the flight controls and/or a spin being mis-identified as a spiral dive. The cameras are a given these days especially where there is a tandem involved. You're obviously familiar with the exercise and I trained long enough ago to have done my share of spinning (hence the tag), but since the authorities in their infinite wisdom decided to prevent pilots from experiencing it, the opportunities for mistakes have multiplied.

 

 

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Guest avi8tr

As I understand it you would never put a prop into beta on descent like that, it would tear it off its' mounts.

 

 

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Guest ozzie

Bugger tapping the crew on the shoulder. I'd be banging them around the head. I like the bit where one jumper points out the dislodged reserve ripcord handle and the jumper places it back in the pocket before departing. I like the look on anothers jumpers face as he watches hi alti unwinding through 3,500 ft. Looks like the tandem passenger was also a parapeligic. His legs are taped together, standard thing to do for them. lucky they got out the G force must have been relatively low. No rigs on the pilots, pretty stupid if it was intentional.

 

Porter and turbine Beaver is standard for beta decents. Not a good idea for twins just in case one does not come out.

 

 

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Yeah I know the Porter is ok to stand on its nose with the prop in beta, but it is verboten in many other turbines, incl the Caravan a mate demonstrated it in - a little ashen when one of the senior pilots rammed home the consequences in a fairly fiery "debrief". Contract pilots in far away places!!:eek: My own time in a turbine has always been fairly informal, with someone watching over my shoulder so I don't pretend to know exactly how the whole power lever vs piston throttle difference plays out, but I have seen reference elsewhere to a prop "disking" ie being set to a finer pitch than if it were pulling the aircraft along at a given speed and that this could lead to disturbed airflow over the tailfeathers. Whatever - a fairly dramatic video I thought and worth a look and a bit of discussion.

 

 

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Guest Darren Masters
Bugger tapping the crew on the shoulder. I'd be banging them around the head. I like the bit where one jumper points out the dislodged reserve ripcord handle and the jumper places it back in the pocket before departing. I like the look on anothers jumpers face as he watches hi alti unwinding through 3,500 ft. Looks like the tandem passenger was also a parapeligic. His legs are taped together, standard thing to do for them. lucky they got out the G force must have been relatively low. No rigs on the pilots, pretty stupid if it was intentional.Porter and turbine Beaver is standard for beta decents. Not a good idea for twins just in case one does not come out.

Specifically what I was thinking. Bugger tapping them on the shoulders and where on earth are their chutes just incase this stunt goes horribly wrong??? Imagine they snapped something in the name of a stunt and then "Oh Christ, no chutes". Joke would have really been on them...

 

 

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