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Yet another Jab down.....


Guest Maj Millard
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Guest Maj Millard

Been notified of a Jab 230 which ended up in a cane field near the NQ town of Calen ( north of Mackay) early today. Engine made metallic noises then failed resulting in the emergency landing. Aircraft had departed Ingham NQ and was headed to Marion, south of where it came down. Pilot uninjured but taken to hospital for observation. Pilot - owner is a local Ingham businessman.......engine with around 400 hrs TT.

 

 

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Great outcome.

 

I'm suspecting it was a result of a very sudden and unusual low pressure pocket incapable of supporting an aircraft only seen every 50 years or so and for no other reason.

 

Or...

 

Here we go again.

 

 

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I'm suspecting it was a result of a very sudden and unusual low pressure pocket incapable of supporting an aircraft only seen every 50 years or so and for no other reason.

Do you mean the notorious "Gravity Gust" ???

 

 

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Could have been a thermal wind......

I'm sure there was some thermal winds on the way down, poor bastard, glad he made it ok.

 

No pics yet but hope it's another testament to Jab's fuse strength.

 

 

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I'm sure there was some thermal winds on the way down, poor bastard, glad he made it ok.No pics yet but hope it's another testament to Jab's fuse strength.

I give Jab a massive A + for crash worthiness

POST EDITED AS IT DOES NOT ADD VALUE - MOD

 

 

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Guest Maj Millard

Don't know yet planedriver, but will let you know when I find out. Aircraft was J230 D , s/no J493.. Formally VH- YYU now 24-8101......

 

 

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Guest Maj Millard
We're not interested in Jab knockers, when they're going well, they're great, we just want the facts.So the problem was?

The facts are in post #1............

 

 

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Spanner in the works?

Many years ago had a Honda Accord come into my workshop with a serious big end rattle, off with the crossmember and sump to find a 12mm ring spanner inside! My customer left with my bill determined to get it paid for by the mechanic who set the tappets the week before! 006_laugh.gif.0f7b82c13a0ec29502c5fb56c616f069.gif

 

 

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I give Jab a massive A + for crash worthiness, they have had a lot of practise.

Give all Jab pilots a double AA for being un be known test pilots, and yes a brilliant survivable airframe, 1 out of 2 usually isn't all that bad but shame number 1 is or is it number 2 that is bad???

 

 

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"We're not interested in Jab knockers, when they're going well, they're great, we just want thefacts.

 

So the problem was?"

 

Jabs are great when they 'go', sure that's true. Unfortunately they are also great at the whole "stopping" thing too. But everyone knows that it only looks that way because there's so many flying. So at least Jab drivers can rest easy knowing that the jabiru that fails next week or even the next couple that fail in november probably won't be them because theres sooooo many flying to choose from. Maybe it could be jabs slogan: "With so many jabirus flying, it probably won't be your engine that fails anyway!"

 

its great that there are many jabs and good on them for the success. The fact that there is so many flying should be a feather in their cap, and a sign that they have had a lot of practice, instead it is an apparent justification for the monthly list of engine failures.....

 

 

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All that matters is the pilot is ok. There are very few new failure modes for jabs. It will be a valve seat or a valve stem, cracked cylinder and or through bolt, or the fly wheel bolts ( screws) lettin go.

 

Plenty of info out there on all these modes of failure so we wknt learn Anything new ( most probably)

 

Caine paddocks look inviting but I reckon it would be a rough ride.

 

Raa pilots seem to have a better success rate in forced landing situations then our ga cousins ( over all).

 

Could just be the lighter aircraft, but nobody could ever say our pilot base aren't well versed and trained on emergencys.

 

 

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"Caine paddocks look inviting but I reckon it would be a rough ride."

 

Haven't done it myself but have been told by several guys who have ( all rotax engines, by the way) that in fact cane landings are very forgiving and by far the safest way place to have a forced landing. You settle into roughly a huge landing net. You pull up quickly but with mostly no damage to airframe.

 

The consensus up here in sugar cane land seems to be if you have the option of landing in the cane or attempting to land on a bush road or headland ( local terminology for a farm road between or along side a cane field) you should take the cane field. Land in the cane right next to the road so when you get out you haven't got to clamber out too far through 2 or 3 metre high cane.

 

 

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