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Spin Resistant Aircraft - Icon A5


Guest Howard Hughes
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Guest Howard Hughes

Is this the first spin resistant aircraft? Is that even possible? It would certainly appear so!014_spot_on.gif.1f3bdf64e5eb969e67a583c9d350cd1f.gif

 

This is a real game changer, maybe the 'Model T' of aircraft?

 

 

 

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Cirrus claim to be spin resistant as well. yet, pilots manage to spin them.

 

looks like they get the spin resistance from a lack of elevator authority, its incapable of getting the AOA to stall angle at low speeds (or any speed?)

 

 

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Anything real in this area would have to be a goer. It's not a universal must have and I hope would never be required to be. Such a plane would not be an inverted flyer nor a real sport plane. But research in this area is to be recommended. The plane dropping into a spin alongside would have to be a bit over the top. Few aircraft, IF any, will enter as clean as that without being deliberately put there. There are some aircaft around which have designs that are totally negligent in not being as low speed controllable as they could easily be. Nev

 

 

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Cirrus claim to be spin resistant as well. yet, pilots manage to spin them.

The Cirrus wing has features designed to make the aircraft more controllable in the stall, lessening the chances of it developing into a spin. Spin resistance does not mean idiot proof. I have stalled a Cirrus and it is quite benign and predictable. More info at http://www.peter2000.co.uk/aviation/misc/3-105960-Cirrusstall-spinreport.pdf

 

 

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Guest Howard Hughes
Few aircraft, IF any, will enter as clean as that without being deliberately put there.

If I remember back many years being demonstrated spins, it was actually quite hard to get a C150 to spin!

 

 

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My experience is that the 15o spins quite readily. The 152, with a more forward cg, is reluctant so requires some persuasion. Of course, both can suddenly enter a spin inadvertently in some situations with little, if any, warning.

 

Many current spin resistant designs are only called that in the context of the spin tests for FAR 23 normal category - one turn or three seconds. Beyond that, they are typically have undesirable behaviour.

 

 

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If you are spin resistant you must have limited elevator up authority with a nose heavy C of G. Load most aircraft tail heavy and more up elevator and she will stall more easily and with ball off centre will wing drop. That is your incipient spin and if you hold the stick right back.(a fairly natural thing to do if you are looking over the nose at the ground) , away you go. Stability isn't always the main aim either. Sometimes such a plane will spiral which used to kill as many as spinning did. Spiralling is more likely to cause structural failure as the airframe gets loaded and the airspeed increases..

 

The type of stall done in the video is the usual stall we teach which is hardly ever the way one comes to grief so we really are not relating our knowledge being imparted to the situation that even some aware and experienced pilots will still fall into the trap with under pressure to tighten the turn and bring the nose around more rapidly in a misjudged turn onto final where you have overshot the centreline and you have little height. when it happens. Minimum height lost stall recovery technique involves using engine power. Critically important you know whether you are stalling, spinning or spiralling. Nev

 

 

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Anything real in this area would have to be a goer. It's not a universal must have and I hope would never be required to be. Such a plane would not be an inverted flyer nor a real sport plane. But research in this area is to be recommended. The plane dropping into a spin alongside would have to be a bit over the top. Few aircraft, IF any, will enter as clean as that without being deliberately put there. There are some aircaft around which have designs that are totally negligent in not being as low speed controllable as they could easily be. Nev

Nev, if you listen to the sound it says he is applying left stick right rudder, I think they were both doing the same. When a stall is entered and held in a 152 isn't it most likely to roll left into a spin ?

 

 

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I'm not sure I am getting it correct but unless a plane is very misrigged (and I've had them) the rudder will determine the direction of spin, starting with wings level. Sometimes there is some set rudder bias on a plane, which may predispose it to turn one way when the engine is throttled back so no pressure with the feet doesn't mean no rudder effect, but it's not a large amount unless you have set it on on something like a P-51.

 

I've done some terrible things with Cessna's like climbing with 3/4 throttle and pulling the stick/ wheel right back and then full rudder and it just did a climbing turn. I was demonstrating this to a student. Still had aileron response due to wing washout. Despite this benign behaviour people still kill themselves in these planes. It may even lull them into a false sense of security.This aircraft was a C-172 with no one in the back. A totally different thing when it has more weight there. Nev

 

 

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