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Convair NC-131H simulator aircraft. Anything with that style of setup would have to be a test bed or simulator.

 

 

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And for those of us not into 70 years of being a nut ... 40 years + reference library + a job years while at Uni watching hundreds of hours of film and building an index to the archive - getting paid

Seventy plus years of being an aeroplane nut helps! Memory goes back to seeing the Bristol Brabazon fly over Edinburgh. Add to that a bookshelf full of reference books and you have your answer!

They have mate, they are called gliders and sailplanes!

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20 minutes ago, red750 said:

It had vertical fins mounted on the wings to simulate crosswinds.

Would it be this one? Convair NC-131HWhat's the point of the Total In-Flight Simulator? - Aviation Stack Exchange

After a quick research, and Simon's link, it turns out to be a simulator for how different aircraft would handle. And was useful is simulating crosswind with the fins installed mid-wing.

If you already have the preliminary aerodynamic data (which won't change mid-testing) to simulate different planes, what's the point of taking that data in the air vs. a ground based simulator?

Edited by bull
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Just now, bull said:

Would it be this one? What's the point of the Total In-Flight Simulator? - Aviation Stack Exchange

After a quick research, and Simon's link, it turns out to be a simulator for how different aircraft would handle. And was useful is simulating crosswind with the fins installed mid-wing.

If you already have the preliminary aerodynamic data (which won't change mid-testing) to simulate different planes, what's the point of taking that data in the air vs. a ground based simulator?

NOW that,s UGLY.........................................................

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That's the one. Could simulate everything from the Edgely Optica to the Space Shuttle under computer control. Called the TIFS - Total In-Flight Simulator. The unusual aircraft flew some 2,500 research flights and contributed to the advancement of many of the flight technologies integral to today's fleet. Prior to its retirement, the TIFS, a 1955 Convair, was the oldest operating aircraft in the Air Force inventory. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Ben Strasser) Date 7 November 2008

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That’s taking first class seating to a new level! Not only better comfort, but they can even offer the advantage that you will be the first to arrive….impressive!

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2 hours ago, red750 said:

That's the one. Could simulate everything from the Edgely Optica to the Space Shuttle under computer control. Called the TFIS - Total In-Flight Simulator. The unusual aircraft flew some 2,500 research flights and contributed to the advancement of many of the flight technologies integral to today's fleet. Prior to its retirement, the TIFS, a 1955 Convair, was the oldest operating aircraft in the Air Force inventory. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Ben Strasser) Date 7 November 2008

Amazing,,,barely resembles a convair at all ,if you had not told me i would have gone russian lol

 

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That's actually a rare bottle nosed dolphin with wings & fins?😉dolphin GIF by Scorpion Dagger

Shown with an astronaut who is well behind the craft during the splash down phase.....t😁

Edited by Flightrite
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  • 4 weeks later...

Yup, that's it. Unusual to have the engine at the front driving a shaft to the prop at the rear.

 

You'd be interested in this then.

 

Nord 2100 Norazur

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Running props in disturbed air gives them hell.  Having weight in the ends of a fuselage causes flat spinning and pitch inertia issues.  Nev

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5 hours ago, facthunter said:

Running props in disturbed air gives them hell.  Having weight in the ends of a fuselage causes flat spinning and pitch inertia issues.  Nev

One of our locals, an ex-commercial pilot in his 80s, flies around the district every Saturday morning. I don’t need to go outside to identify his very noisy pusher.

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The idea was: Cheap power line inspection and traffic reporting, compared to a fling wing operating costs. Like the later Brit designed Optica.

Edited by F10
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Funny how they never succeed. That one, Edgeley Optica and Seabird Seeker all chased the same market and apparently sank without trace.

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2 minutes ago, derekliston said:

Funny how they never succeed. That one, Edgeley Optica and Seabird Seeker all chased the same market and apparently sank without trace.

Yeah, which is strange as it seems to make sense on paper. I have 50 odd hours on my mystery aircraft, some years back. Flying with the side doors slid back, the view is tremendous, very helicopter like.

Had the worst control harmony I’ve experienced, very heavy ailerons, not bad elevator control and a feather light rudder, almost the exact reverse of what you kind of want! 

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Patchen Explorer.. Was it the control anomaly the led to its tragic demise?...

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The Fiat 7002 experimental helicopter. Its rotor was driven by compressed air jets mounted on the end of the rotor blades.

I cannot even begin to comprehend what the sound of the rotor of this thing would be like. 

 

http://www.diseno-art.com/encyclopedia/strange_vehicles/fiat_7002_helicopter.html

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There was a French one I just had to look up too Sud-Ouest Djinn with tip jets which I think (didn’t look this bit up!) was powered by a Turbomeca Artouste!

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