Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 2.5k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Yes, Googles algorithms find virtually everything that has ever been posted for public display. And I've spent 20 yrs fine-tuning my internet searching abilities.   As a little thread drift

That's it Kasper. The left wheel folded into a fairing on the right side of the fuselage, and the right wheel into a lefthand fairing. In 1998 Explorer Aircraft was established in Jasper, Texas, to co

Avid Explorer  when it was in Taree in 2012.

Posted Images

5 minutes ago, facthunter said:

Beagle Pup? Nev

It states ten built? There were not many but I think more than ten and if you include the Bulldog, rather more?

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, derekliston said:

Only company I can think of in UK that might have built something like that and only ten of them would be Britten Norman, but if it is, I can find nothing about it!

Not only 10.  Over 20 of them.  The 10 was the modified ju87 with jettisoning fixed gear.

 

to help - 26 in total built. 
 

next clue tomorrow 
 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kasper said:

Not only 10.  Over 20 of them.  The 10 was the modified ju87 with jettisoning fixed gear.

 

to help - 26 in total built. 
 

next clue tomorrow 
 

Can only find the Edgley Optica but 23 of them built apparently. No idea about jettisonable undercarriage though!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thinks... must have been a fixed gear aircraft that was expected to spend a lot of time over water. Post war, so slow heavy lifter?  Hmmm

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done.  Yes. The short seamew.  A plane design hit repeatedly with the ugly stick and then given half the power it needed.   Whack a double mamba in the front and I think it would have had half a chance in its role

Edited by kasper
Link to post
Share on other sites

What is more annoying is that there is another post on here about the Seamew and Airtruk!!! Yet nobody picked it before pmccarthy! Well done that man.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

A Quadruplane ...  obviously from the age when (wings) more is better..

Looks live two biplanes siamesed together with 4 wings and 2 elevators

A long distant from the plane they would develop..

Supermarine P.B.31E Nighthawk

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Supposed to be capable of 18 hours endurance but at 75mph and took an hour to climb to 10,000 feet. Designed to defend England from Zeppelins, it was a failure.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Another one without a photo.

 

What helicopter had two angled tail rotors?

Link to post
Share on other sites

The desccription of the Apache's tail rotor I have seen is simply a 4 blade tail rotor. Although the two pairs of blades are not at right angles, they appear to be to one unit and do not counter-rotate. The machine in question has separate tail rotors at the end of two Vee shaped booms.

 

1431918014_Veerotors.JPG.d574caab05e5404b911a5ca20838f8b1.JPG

 

I believe the odd spacing of the Apache's tail rotor reduces noise, similar to the odd blade spacing on some fenestrons.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a photo of the S-56. It looks nothing like the image above. This aircraft is from around the same era, but is European. It was later modified to a conventional single tail rotor.

 

S-56.jpg.b85a46d8c7cf666bff55b00cc3b5be23.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

The caption on this photo says it was an early experimental version of the S-56 but the caption may be wrong. I will keep looking. 🙂

C4174858-7447-49CD-B413-7E8EF0607DD6.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's put this to rest. The machine I came across was a SNCASE SE-3110 or Sud-Est SE-3110,

a French two seat experimental helicopter with unusual twin, angled tail rotors, first flown in 1950. After brief tests SNCASE decided to concentrate on a closely related but single-tail-rotor design.

 

se3110-7.jpg.0c88deabc1cde929e306909b0583139b.jpg

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep. The way to spot the difference from the Bf-109 is the higher placement of the exhausts, like the Spitfire. Bf-109 exhausts are below the propeller drive shaft.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...