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Greetings Gentlemen (and Ladies)Had a brief natter with Ian's widow this morning. Thankfully she has numerous family members (from both sides) around her and seems to be coping reasonably well. Gay reckoned that Pud would prefer that, rather than floral tributes, a donation to cancer research in his memory would have positive results in slowing and/or eliminating this insidious disease. Accordingly, rather than for me to arrange flowers or to collect and relay offerings, I suggest that forumites could donate directly to The Prostate Cancer Research Foundation of Australia. Their webpage has an 'easy-to-follow' selection of methods in which to donate along with any special directions as to whom honouring. Once achieved, if those participating can send me an email advising of their contribution (not the amount) I'll add their forum (or real) names, to an Rec Flying condolences card to be presented at the funeral (probably next Wed/Thurs). Thanks from Gay to everyone who expressed their tributes and farewells on the forums. I'm know she appreciates hearing of just how well thought of Pud was. Enjoy life folks - it's a gift we sometimes don't take time to appreciate while we're doing it.

Done. Cheers all

 

 

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Have been on this site for quite a few years even though I'm a little on the quiet side and having never met the man but have always enjoyed his contributions to this great site, and what people say about Pud shows he was of good character and a Gentleman. Maybe I'll meet you in the blues skies one day mate. RIP

 

 

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Pud's memorial service is being held on Thursday, 10/09/15 @2:00 PM at the West Chapel of the Fremantle Cemetery. A couple of Thruster drivers from the local RAA aviation fraternity will attend for a final farewell and a card from forum mates (signed on their behalf) will be passed to Gay.

 

 

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Guest Maj Millard
Pud's memorial service is being held on Thursday, 10/09/15 @2:00 PM at the West Chapel of the Fremantle Cemetery. A couple of Thruster drivers from the local RAA aviation fraternity will attend for a final farewell and a card from forum mates (signed on their behalf) will be passed to Gay.

Riley, Thanks for your assistance on this......from all on this forum I'm sure.

 

 

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Riley, Thanks for your assistance on this......from all on this forum I'm sure.

Pud made his final departure yesterday in the company of hundreds of funeral attendees which more than proves that he wasn't just an 'aviator's kinda guy'.

The family thanks everyone sincerely for their kind thoughts throughout the ordeal with special mention for those who donated to <<Prostate Cancer Research>>. In the eulogy to her man Gay urged that, in order to possibly avoid Pud's downfall, all men must have regular blood tests to identify prostate cancer in it's early (and treatable) stages. My personal thanks to Hitc, Biggles, naremman, Maj, rgmwa, and farri who supported the Research Foundation with their contributions in memory of the big fella. Riley

 

 

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Really sad indeed. I'm glad he got to read my book,and he sent me an email thanking me. So saddened by this news.

 

Pic of Ian and gay leaving Sherlock last November.

 

image.jpg.97fc6705d76de8c1f42e8e4cfe5785cd.jpg

 

 

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I just got this news today. I am deeply saddened and had no idea the big fella was ill.

 

I was fortunate enough to meet Ian some years back with 'Ol' Riley when I was visiting Perth. I kinda lost close contact with Ian over the last two years or so, perhaps because he wasn't well.

 

Rest in peace ol buddy we will miss you.

 

My sincerest condolences to the Gay and the family.

 

Man o Man is live a fragile existence ... gone too soon ...

 

 

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I too have only just caught up on this sad news. With his passing goes the collected knowledge of all things aeronauticle. Thank you Pud for sharing your experiences and insights with us while you could.

 

 

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I too have only just caught up on this sad news. With his passing goes the collected knowledge of all things aeronauticle. Thank you Pud for sharing your experiences and insights with us while you could.

I'd have to agree with the above, but there are so many more guys on here that we'd also miss when that sad day comes and we don't expect it.

 

Enjoy life while you are able.

 

Above all, fulfill your dreams while you can, you can't expect much more that that!

 

I certainly don't!

 

 

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Hi guys, although I gave up flying three years ago (now aged 76), thanks to my wife's insistence that I get a check up, I was diagnosed with prostate cancer at age 64, the cancer was aggressive but thankfully we got it early and had it removed.

 

Please, please, please get a regular check up after the age of 40 yrs, yes I did state 40.

 

Alan. (A very thankful survivor).

 

 

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Apparently we all get it, but its more aggressive in the younger ones...its in my family so I cnat stress how important it is to get a PSA blood test done as young as you can (30+) for a baseline PSA measurement

 

 

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Mine was checked the other week at 34.

 

I say get it checked regularly past 25, I know at that age the risk is almost not there.

 

But get it checked when you renew your aviation medical (yearly for me).

 

For the sake of a bit of uncomfortably its well worth it.

 

 

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Whilst death from prostate cancer rates too high in male departures, it doesn't have to be this way as an annual physical inspection (ye auld finger-fiddling in the rear rural region) coupled with a blood test will in most cases identify the presence of this silent exterminater. At the point of early identification there are a number of options available to combat the problem. In some cases, an elevated PSA count (the usual marker of presence of prostate problems) can be reduced simply with medication. At age 74 I went from a rapidly-elevating reading of 6.4 somethings (with biopsy-identifed cancer cells) down to 0.162 somethings over a two year period simply thru daily intake of a prescribed testosterone-scavenging medication. Apparently prostate cancer feeds on testosterone ergo: no testosterone = an inhospitable environment for the cancer cells. Perhaps not effective in all scenarios, but for me this has meant No surgery, No radiation, No chemotherapy (and not too much in the way of slap and tickle anymore but it's a small price to pay for an extended lifespan). Any male who has access to regular prostate health checks and doesn't ensure that it's regularily monitored is a damned fool! Here endeth the lesson.

 

 

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Apparently we all get it, but its more aggressive in the younger ones...its in my family so I cnat stress how important it is to get a PSA blood test done as young as you can (30+) for a baseline PSA measurement

Don't fret if one test is elevated above baseline either. An odd elevated level can be caused by something as simple as a rough week of mustering on the bike, don't lose any sleep until after your retest.

 

 

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I know what you mean Alan, been there, done that, but what a wake-up call it can be. Get in as early as you can.

 

My PSA was really quite high but I had brachy-seed therapy asap ( took two years as I don't have money behind me)and now it's 0.003 Yee Ha! Probably die from $2 clean-skins now, or worrying about you blokes.

 

 

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Hi guys, although I gave up flying three years ago (now aged 76), thanks to my wife's insistence that I get a check up, I was diagnosed with prostate cancer at age 64, the cancer was aggressive but thankfully we got it early and had it removed.Please, please, please get a regular check up after the age of 40 yrs, yes I did state 40.

Alan. (A very thankful survivor).

G'day Guernsey, I am happy you're a survivor! Thanks for the advice for us all (...well, er, apart from the female aviators here who have no prostates to check).

 

The prostate test is somewhat invasive but, when it is all said and done, it is a few minutes of discomfort for potentially many extra years to one's life. Weigh it up and it is clearly worth it.

 

 

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If I may, Ian would be so pleased to see that his life has not been totally in vain. To know that we have reached all of you with our message is of great comfort. There are many treatments for prostate cancer now and more being developed with research. Please remember to also make sure YOU get the results of your tests, dont just assume the GP will get back to you if something is wrong. Please keep this conversation going, and beyond this forum would be even better!

 

I thank you all warmly for your sympathy and support.

 

Gay

 

 

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My father was diagnosed with prostrate cancer earlier this year. He lives with us and for years I have been hearing the dribbles and have been pushing him to get regular tests. He finally got tested and sure enough he had it. He had a PET scan and luckily it had gone no where else especially considering how long I think he has had it. Prostrate cancer like many others does not actually kill you what actually kills you is when the cancer cells spin off and get into your liver or kidneys, lungs/brain etc that is what actually kills you.

 

They did not take my dad's prostrate out they had 3 gold pellets injected into his prostate which they use as targets and he went every day 5 days a week for 9 weeks for targeted radiation also before this they slide like a contraceptive stick into him below his stomach under the skin and he has some special pills he had to take during this time this took around 3 months then he had the radiation. There are many more successful methods of treatment now not like before so do not be afraid of them. My dad who is 78 seems to have gotten though this quite ok although the last week of radiation drained him a lot be he seems to be back to his best again. I have been tested regularly every 12 months since I was 40 and urge every man to get it done. if you do happen to have issues then the treatments now are much better and very successful do not be afraid of this incidious slow acting/growing silent asassin the success rates are extremely high now

 

 

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