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I was paying 2-2.20/l. Where did you see it at 1.43??No, its at the Sherman Municipal Airport in Sherman, TX.

A mighty long time ago ... when fuel there wasn't much more than in Kuwait IIRC.

 

I missed the point anyway, the sign wasn't Fuel 'up here', it meant Fuel-up here ... too early in the morning I guess.

 

 

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According to this http://www.ppp.shell.com/prices.aspx 100LL is $1.85 per litre (plus ~ $0.04 excise and 10% GST) in most places around the major cities in Australia. Convertng US gallons to litres and an exchange rate of $AU1 = $US0.70, the price in Texas is $AU 1.50. Sherman is a stone's throw from Dallas.

 

OME

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
Are we allowing for the US gallon being smaller than Imp. Nev

There's about half a litre difference between the imperial and the US gallon so it's quite significant once you're looking at tankfulls.

 

 

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Avgas here seems to be running around $1.96 at YSWH (Sunday) and $2.06 at YWGT and YSHT (last week).

 

That USD price equates to about $1.40 per litre which is around 30% less than we are paying.

 

Kaz

 

 

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Yep, our 44 gal drums are what the Yanks refer to as 55 gal drums. 200 litres.

I think you'll find that in America they're 50 gallon drums, not 55 gallons. There's pretty close to 4lt to a US gallon hence 4x50=200lts.

 

An Imperial gallon is 4.54lts. 44 Imp gallons x 4.54 = 200lts.

 

Gladly their fuel and ours both have the same SG otherwise we'd really be up the creek ...

 

 

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I think you'll find that in America they're 50 gallon drums, not 55 gallons. .

Nup, 55 gallons, theirs are 208 litres, ours are 200. a small difference, but it can be significant.

 

That 8 litre difference can get lost in the packaging, and they're close enough to stack and be handled together. I think for convenience sake in international transport that the common 44 gallon drums are often just 55 US gallon drums not quite filled to the US mark. A bit like 2x4 is not precisely 2x4 but usually rather 50x100 +/- sawmill slack and warpage.

 

 

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Diesel is quite a bit cheaper than petrol in NZ, generally diesel is about 3/4 the price of petrol.

 

Conversely, in Oz, diesel is usually a bit dearer than petrol. I wonder why? Diesel fuel is "cruder" than petrol and supposedly a bit easier and cheaper to make from crude oil.

 

Are people in Australia getting ripped off with their diesel prices?

 

 

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Several factors have contributed to the diesel price rise. According to NRMA

 

The main reason for diesel being consistently more expensive than standard unleaded petrol is that most diesel is sold under contract to fleet operators, mainly for heavy vehicles. This means the volume sold at your local service station is low, leaving retailers little incentive to discount.

 

Also previous Government regulations allowed diesel to contain 500 particles per million of sulphur. This has recently been adjusted to allow only 50ppm resulting in the production costs of diesel and unleaded petrol being quite similar.

 

Diesel prices are also kept high by demand in Asia, where most transport uses diesel.

 

Many Australians holidaying in New Zealand come back wondering why diesel is significantly cheaper there than it is here. However, Trans-Tasman diesel prices cannot be compared, as diesel in NZ is not taxed at the point of sale. Rather, diesel vehicle owners are required to pay a Road User Charge (RUC) in distance travelled slots, making the actual cost of the journey much more expensive than it appears at the bowser.

 

 

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Several factors have contributed to the diesel price rise. According to NRMAThe main reason for diesel being consistently more expensive than standard unleaded petrol is that most diesel is sold under contract to fleet operators, mainly for heavy vehicles. This means the volume sold at your local service station is low, leaving retailers little incentive to discount.

Also previous Government regulations allowed diesel to contain 500 particles per million of sulphur. This has recently been adjusted to allow only 50ppm resulting in the production costs of diesel and unleaded petrol being quite similar.

 

Diesel prices are also kept high by demand in Asia, where most transport uses diesel.

 

Many Australians holidaying in New Zealand come back wondering why diesel is significantly cheaper there than it is here. However, Trans-Tasman diesel prices cannot be compared, as diesel in NZ is not taxed at the point of sale. Rather, diesel vehicle owners are required to pay a Road User Charge (RUC) in distance travelled slots, making the actual cost of the journey much more expensive than it appears at the bowser.

When I moved to NZ, I decided to make one of my cars a diesel car. I can tell you that it is significantly cheaper to run a diesel car despite the relatively minimal RUC you mentioned. GST is still payable on diesel as well so it is not tax free.

 

 

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Yeah, but while it has GST and a bunch of general snatch and grab taxes, it doesn't have about 40c of tax per litre of roading maintenance targeted tax that petrol does.

 

91 was at 203.9c this morning as I went past the BP in Rolleston, I think I saw a MTA phamplet once that showed for every $1 you pay for petrol, the govt gets around 60c and the petrol company makes a profit of around 2c. the rest is oil and refining and transport overhead.

 

So at current prices, every litre you pump into your car, you're giving the govt $1.20 in revenue, but diesel they only get about 80c.

 

 

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Yeah, but while it has GST and a bunch of general snatch and grab taxes, it doesn't have about 40c of tax per litre of roading maintenance targeted tax that petrol does.91 was at 203.9c this morning as I went past the BP in Rolleston, I think I saw a MTA phamplet once that showed for every $1 you pay for petrol, the govt gets around 60c and the petrol company makes a profit of around 2c. the rest is oil and refining and transport overhead.

 

So at current prices, every litre you pump into your car, you're giving the govt $1.20 in revenue, but diesel they only get about 80c.

Much of the collected funds are excises and road taxes which represents the wear and tear of the roads that cars use. The more you travel, the more roads you wear out and the more fuel you buy to pay for those roads. And this is where it gets pretty unfair for boaties and aviators: there is no water in the harbour, nor air in the air to wear out. But still, boaties and aviators are paying big road taxes on the fuel they buy.

 

 

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But you CAN claim the roading tax back every year...

 

Farmers hooning around on quad bikes can build up a big tax overpayment that way and there are at least three companies advertising in the rural papers trying to get farmers to use their rebate filing services...

 

 

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And of course if you use diesel in an aircraft there are no Road User Charges - add that to the economy of a diesel and its a no-brainer - provided you can fit a diesel engine and still stay under the weight limits - eh Charlie?

 

 

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Remember the 3 + 3 fuel levy that was applied to fuel in New South Wales years ago? It was a three cent levy which was to be applied for three years and the revenue was for road works. I'm sure that it was never revoked and I can't think of how long ago that was because since then I've developed Old Timers' Disease.

 

OME

 

 

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And of course if you use diesel in an aircraft there are no Road User Charges - add that to the economy of a diesel and its a no-brainer - provided you can fit a diesel engine and still stay under the weight limits - eh Charlie?

If you use an auto diesel engine, you could raid a 2 stroke oil metering device off a twin tank (oil + petrol separate) 2 stroke scooter and run it on jet-A with 2 stroke oil as a lubrication agent. Fill it with diesel and you can just close off the metering device.

 

I understand pure Jet-A is too "Dry" for the seals and pump clearances which rely on road diesel for lubrication.

 

 

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