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First solo in Nebraska about 6 weeks ago. If you get that far I kept saying what a shitty landing. Pat told me the landing was fine. Just felt like I bounced high and in reality it was about 150mm. I have since sorted the flare.

 

 

I seem to have this sorted. Somehow it works now with same cut and paste as above .

 Only thing I can think of is time after I posted to YouTube allowed it to link.

 

Interesting thing is no radio contact. USA don’t seem to contact their student pilot. I guess it’s a controversial topic. If I’d had Pat on the radio it would have been as much distraction as help. I had to focus totally on getting it right without help or possibly distraction. 

 

 

 

 

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This is my first Solo, yes I had to add the song from Top Gun so don't ask! 🤣🤣 I'm in my new to me Tecnam P96 and loving it. 

Watch an AG pilot for a while Nev, somebody doing solid fert

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 They don't want to distract you. Every flare is different. You can't just "time " it. If you are a bit slow the flare will be shorter of perhaps won't work well at all.. Have fun. You are paying for it. Nev

 

 

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If it's not pretty to watch, you just don't show anyone. Nev

 

That’s true. 

 

With regard to pressure.....The recording didn’t cause me pressure. I’d filmed 150 hours of tv (well, potential tv footage with Grand Designs) That had moments where we had producer, executive producer, sound, logistics (very attractive logistics), 2 camera men and a drone crew. I ignored all that or tried to ignore to keep the show real. 

 

 

When Pat (CFI ) and I reviewed Gopro he said “wow, if I’d seen this I’d not have worried” I had seen a few solo youtube Clips prior to mine. I figured if it can help anyone through theirs then it’s worth filming and publishing. First solo almost as much pressure as Checkride. It should all be fun as Pat kept telling me. My first moment of real fun was on a solo cross country and climbing through scattered cloud. 

 

 

Madison South Dakota flying school was also fun. A lot of young pilots studying and flying together. They were mainly getting endorsements or commercial. Great learning environment. The gyro below flew 5 times at Madison. Engine failed 4 of the 5 before it never flew again. I was thinking it’s a record for failures and what mad bastard kept trying!

 

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  • 3 months later...

Happened yesterday.

 

the first solo was euphoric,

interesting mix of nerves and being consciously calm - taking my time and checking everything as taught.

the flight was serene. landed (with a slight bounce) and felt such a mixture of emotions and energy

 

the second solo later in the day was more interesting...

puncture in the Tyre as I taxied back to drop off the instructor.

was able to get a second Jabiru out the hangar to do the solo part. can really pick up on the differences when you fly planes back to back

 

then got a radio call from the instructor after my first touch and go - to reverse the circuit on downiwind as there had been a change of wind on the ground.

nailed the landing, one of the best Ive done

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Guest Machtuk

Happened yesterday.

 

the first solo was euphoric,

interesting mix of nerves and being consciously calm - taking my time and checking everything as taught.

the flight was serene. landed (with a slight bounce) and felt such a mixture of emotions and energy

 

the second solo later in the day was more interesting...

puncture in the Tyre as I taxied back to drop off the instructor.

was able to get a second Jabiru out the hangar to do the solo part. can really pick up on the differences when you fly planes back to back

 

then got a radio call from the instructor after my first touch and go - to reverse the circuit on downiwind as there had been a change of wind on the ground.

nailed the landing, one of the best Ive done

 

Congrats, now you will be financially challenged for life..lolol

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Seeing the exciting threads in this forum prompted me to go back into the deep dark history of my logbook to look for prompters to remind me more about my first solo because I am old now in years and honestly cannot remember the finer details. It was on April 22nd 1974 in a Cessna 172 at Ardmore airport in Kiwiland. The log book entry did not help much as there is not much room to make many remarks and I was more of a conservative nerd in those days:) It just says "FIRST SOLO".

 

I wholeheartedly relate to the other common threads on this thread that the lighter weight was very noticeable on climb out and more concentration needed on landing as it floated a little down the strip. Ardmore was and I suppose still is a very busy airport with 6 or 7 in the circuit not uncommon so I was busy. Yes I was very happy and it is the quintessential moment or realisation that one actually can fly (& land ) a plane. Of course it was just a small achievement relative to learning to hopefully become a safe and proficient pilot.

 

It does however more interestingly bring up the question about training in those days compared to now because I was surprised to see that I went solo in 3.95 hrs. Certainly now it seems especially in LSA solos seem to be around the 8,9,10 even 20 hour mark. I do believe my solo time was about normal in those days.

Does it depend on the "difficulty " of the aircraft type to fly & land i.e a GA in a 172 vs LSA in a J120 Jab or has the syllabus requirement changed since those days?

I dont know but I do know that I have talked with many student pilots at airfields still not solo after a lot of hours such as above and I also know the jabiru for example can be difficult to land compared to the much heavier 172 as I have about 90 hours in the small original Jabs .

 

  • Anyone shed some light on this? Is RAAus training in very light aircraft contributing to this?
  • Anyone have data?
  • Are flight schools more greedy?
  • Has the proficiency requirements changed?

 

For comparison the first 8 flights totalling 3.95 hours consisted of TIF, effect of controls, climbing and descending, medium & climbing turns, stalls, circuits, more circuits, and more circuits. [Total circuit time 2.05 hrs]

 

By the way FYI, I see in my log my cost per hour was $11.00 per hr dual!!!!!!!!!!!...............................Wish it was more like that to fly these days:cheezy grin:

 

 

Regards.

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Mine took 11.4 hours and included incipient spins & low flying as well as everything Skydog mentioned. Total number of flights was 14 with 9 of these being circuits. Several were flapless and also with EFATOs on all legs & before takeoff. After first solo there was about 5 hours of solo circuit consolidation with the first 1 or 2 with an instructor & the rest solo with the number increasing to 7 by the end. It was at a fairly busy Hamilton airport (NZ) so radio work had to be correct with the odd international flight so orbits were ordered every now & again. When first flying in Australia I was quite astounded at the poor use of correct radio phraseology and long winded calls with a lot of extra information only useful to the caller. Still happens all the time in CTAF and is quite annoying.

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Guest Machtuk

Mine took 11.4 hours and included incipient spins & low flying as well as everything Skydog mentioned. Total number of flights was 14 with 9 of these being circuits. Several were flapless and also with EFATOs on all legs & before takeoff. After first solo there was about 5 hours of solo circuit consolidation with the first 1 or 2 with an instructor & the rest solo with the number increasing to 7 by the end. It was at a fairly busy Hamilton airport (NZ) so radio work had to be correct with the odd international flight so orbits were ordered every now & again. When first flying in Australia I was quite astounded at the poor use of correct radio phraseology and long winded calls with a lot of extra information only useful to the caller. Still happens all the time in CTAF and is quite annoying.

 

I have to agree on the part re poor R/T procedures. It's a pet hate of mine in Australia, the amateur and superfluous chit chat that pervades a lot of CTAF dromes on W/E's!

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  • 2 weeks later...

I learned in a Cessna 170A. My mates thought I was nuts to learn in a tailwheel aircraft but that's what they did years ago so.... First suggestion to solo by my CFI as he was stepping out of the plane was for me to give it the gas. I wasn't ready that day. A few days later I was and after my second landing to a full stop I was so excited I lost count so I did two more landings disobeying his request for three. I now have about 350 hours of tailwheel time and 10 of nose dragger. So, I need some transition training!

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It's better to do T/W from the start I think, if that's what you will be flying. When I did it there were no tricycle geared planes. Later I got the job of converting a few tricycle pilots onto the DH82. One "Jet only" fellow never got solo (with me anyhow). Single engined Jets have no tendency to turn with power application. I doubt his feet ever got much activity.. I'm a bit with Yenn . I'm used to 3 pointing T/W planes unless the wind is gusty and you have to pin them on. Hardly anyone seems to do that these days. Nev

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Wheelers do seem to be the norm now but there is nothing nicer to watch that a well executed 3 pointer. I think that a lot of newer T/W pilots aren't very good at it so stick with wheeling.

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You use a lot more of the runway when you wheel them on. I think 3 point is easier. The tail is going to have to come down at some point. If your tailwheel steers properly, having the stick right back makes it useful earlier. Not in strong winds or gusts though. Probably sensible people don't fly then. But.... Nev

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First solo was a interesting one, had been doing all my training in a J170. Had my mind set that my first solo would be around the 15hour mark. The day started with the J170 out for service so opted to try the J230 with the guidance of the instructor assuming it would just be some circuit training given I was at about 12.5 hours. After about 3 circuits the instructor asked me to do a full stop and proceeded to tell me time for your first solo.

 

Never thought I would be so soon in the training and had no idea would be in the faster more powerful J230. Though looking back it was a great lesson in keeping cool and just fly the plane. I thinking I would have been more stressed if it had know it was coming.

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I'm a bit ambivalent about the "spring it on you before you've had time to stress out' philosophy. . There's no need to do it in minimum time. Good dual is always a learning process and you should be feeling quite comfortable with the circuit and going around. I see solo more as consolidation and sometimes over a longer period a deterioration (corner cutting) process happens with some, that will need picking up on. Your early ab initio training is not making you the complete pilot. It's a sound BASE to develop more skills on further training.. You keep learning all your flying life if you are smart. If you aren't very smart and think you know pretty much all there is to know, you may well become a liability. Nev

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  • 6 months later...

I remember Grade 1 instructor telling me to trust him if he tells me that I'm ready for my 1st solo. So I trusted him:) Did everything by the book, smooth landing, very happy cheered when landed.. 2nd solo I used whole 1335m runway, too soft on brakes.. 3rd solo landed on the grass, actually pushed by the xwind, but all good :) But I really got the feeling of being a Pilot after 2nd Nav, 250nm with 3 takeoffs and 3 landings to a never landed before aerodrome. Massive confidence boost and at that was the point I convinced myself that I am a Pilot :) Cheers

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  • 4 months later...

 

This is my first Solo, yes I had to add the song from Top Gun so don't ask! 🤣🤣 I'm in my new to me Tecnam P96 and loving it. 

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On 23/02/2020 at 5:37 PM, facthunter said:

You use a lot more of the runway when you wheel them on. I think 3 point is easier. The tail is going to have to come down at some point. If your tailwheel steers properly, having the stick right back makes it useful earlier. Not in strong winds or gusts though. Probably sensible people don't fly then. But.... Nev

I disagree nev, if you put them on the spot you want then buggar all distance difference. There is very little difference in speed between tailwheel just above the surface and touching. 

People flying tailwheel aircraft for a living usually tailwheel low landing, generally try to spare the tailwheel.

One reason for a full three point landing would be if you were VERY limited in your landing distance. Not as if runway distance is limited in most cases. 

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A lot of the wheelers I've seen lately are quite tail high when the touchdown occurs so are therefore quite fast. If you are slow and hold the tailwheel on the ground it can't bounce and is steerable with the tailwheel itself. This is the technique with small rudder, fast planes. Nev

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