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As a thought... could you use a CA glue (superglue) to fix the gussets to the frame members for transport? The gussets could have undersized holes drilled (or laser cut or punched) in them and all the builder would need to do it is match drill to the frame member underneath and then ream out to the final size, no debuting needed. Because the glue is only holding the frame together for transport there would be less need for a high level of quality control, the loads in service would be transferred through the rivets. The frames could be build on a jig in the factory to ensure accurate alignment and placement of the members.

 

 

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Ah, there is the problem. Pushups. I never do them. Better to stress your heart with a good Cabernet Sauvignon.   Good to hear from you Bex.

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As a thought... could you use a CA glue (superglue) to fix the gussets to the frame members for transport? The gussets could have undersized holes drilled (or laser cut or punched) in them and all the builder would need to do it is match drill to the frame member underneath and then ream out to the final size, no debuting needed. Because the glue is only holding the frame together for transport there would be less need for a high level of quality control, the loads in service would be transferred through the rivets. The frames could be build on a jig in the factory to ensure accurate alignment and placement of the members.

And the more you build on the factory floor and assemble the higher the cost.

If Bex is targeting a very low cost kit the builder really is going to have to do most of the assembly.

 

Match drilled is good.

 

Temporary assembly or full Assembly in the factory of substantial components is not going to work.

 

 

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Good ideas are always welcome.

 

A lot of thought goes into each step how one can achieve this build with;

 

a/ No previous knowledge.

 

b/ A drill, hacksaw and riveter.

 

c/ Not much space.

 

Please note this is a jigless, self aligning build, built on any reasonable flat'ish workbench or floor if you still got young limbs!

 

Example; You see that center fixture plate above, flat sides "A" are an alignment tool, as are the edges of the holes "B", it works a treat. Sit the plates on top of the tubes, use these aligning aids and drill through the pre-lasered holes. Clean and rivet.

 

It really is that easy.

 

1328116961_align1.jpg.07c95a63d41c86695108937d1bf873c5.jpg

 

860186644_align2.jpg.fa1e4c10b0ba5917a25ca2291a5223a5.jpg

 

The thicker support plates have the correct sized hole, while the thinner aluminium sheets have pilot holes only, or else the drill wanders and ovals a full sized hole.

 

.

 

 

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Here is another example used,

 

A pre-laser holed and folded "U" channel, or 90 degree fold otherwise, is supplied and you merely pop your tubes into the 90 degree corners accordingly, add your cross braces, drill, clean and rivet.

 

115240571_align3.jpg.4b6e01fe667b063235c9d4638f513f08.jpg

 

1081303126_align4.jpg.7904ae2d8fb98522bf3e2b4f444f2b78.jpg

 

 

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Temporary assembly or full Assembly in the factory of substantial components is not going to work.

My glue suggestion was as an alternative to welding where by definition the frame needed to be factory assembled at least in part.

 

Getting the balance right between what is done by the builder and what is done by the kit maker is a big part of a successful kit. By trialing assemblies and practising on real parts Bex is likely to get the balance right.

 

 

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Hi BexSomething you might want to look into is that the kit must meet the FAA's 51% rule if you wish to sell the kits in the USA and other places

FWF, instruments paint etc don't count I believe

 

Cheers

See the linked doc, Appendix 8 to calculate.

 

https://www.eaa.org/en/eaa/aviation-communities-and-interests/homebuilt-aircraft-and-homebuilt-aircraft-kits/how-to-build-an-airplane/selection-articles/~/media/68622b08072841d6b76c8cc7c3d51be0.ashx

 

 

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the kit must meet the FAA's 51% rule if you wish to sell the kits in the USA

Thanks Allan, indeed everything is aimed at exactly that, appreciate your comment.

 

There is certainly confusion about what the 51% rule means but believe I have a handle on it and fitting the bill accordingly so that the builder will be proficient and capable on 50%+ of the build processes in order to obtain his Repairman's Certificate for that craft.

 

 

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The Tucano is currently undergoing the FAA 51% approval to be listed as an approved kit. Flying Legend has set up an office/warehouse in Texas and the first part of the process was to provide a complete kit unassembled which is inspected, once an OK is received the quick build kit is next and checked off against the FAA approved checklist which is the same as the AC in Australia.

 

As I understand it its a detailed and structured process but well worth a manufacturer obtaining as it is recognized worldwide.

 

Why do this - to have your kit can be delivered in the highest state of assembly just look a a RV7 quick build and other new products that a placing their hopes in that process, the market is geared to quick build in the USA and most likely the rest of the world.

 

 

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The Tucano is currently undergoing the FAA 51% approval to be listed as an approved kit.just look a a RV7 quick build and other new products that a placing their hopes in that process,

Yes worthy of note it is an option, a valuable one but not a requirement.

 

Yup you can build your RV7 in as little as 3 years rather than 5 - not quite my idea of "quick build".

 

Good luck with yours, the part fuse looked good at Narromine last year. One of the best looking craft out there.

 

 

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Well the rear sides are just about done and the front corners are getting close.

 

Glad I decided to split them, the smaller sizes are damn convenient on the work bench.

 

75263800_newsides2017.jpg.f7cb309f2df50cc4f4c2661706976437.jpg

 

 

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Well did some optimising over the weekend and did some weight checks, appears I've knocked 6 kgs out of, I was expecting a couple so has come as a pleasant surprise.

 

Putting it all together again now.

 

B1.jpg.8ed9ccfd58adff36c45a49203bc1f249.jpg

 

 

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Well did some optimising over the weekend and did some weight checks, appears I've knocked 6 kgs out of, I was expecting a couple so has come as a pleasant surprise.Putting it all together again now.

 

[ATTACH=full]47529[/ATTACH]

Bex with the fuselage frames changing from the curvy ones you had before, to a straight line from rear cabin to tailpost, does that mean your turtledeck will now be a single half cone rather than the double-angle one you had previously?

 

 

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Bex with the fuselage frames changing from the curvy ones you had before,

Not a straight line, still curvy.

 

That's not very nice Alan......

Obviously a joke, no prob here.

 

 

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So finished these sides this morning, and started screwing, ok riveting, the rear half together.

 

This involved first joining the tail, then merely bringing the halves together to the roll cage, clamp, drill through the lasered pilot holes, clean and rivet. All self aligning and self jigging without measuring anything.

 

I am extremely pleased with the ease and speed they go together, not to mention the result.

 

One of the good things is that now the entire rear half, and entire front halves of the fuse will be able to be built independent of each other and bought together at a later stage as required.

 

There are homebuilders who lack building or bench space, and this will be ideal for them.

 

Marty, as there are no rear half central laterals installed yet, that's why there's little "curvy" at the moment. Those laterals will push it out further in the middle.

 

1238995850_RH1.jpg.837cac3013759f0fbf76d4dcd8a304b8.jpg

 

121901098_RH2.jpg.17615222519ea0f524802806904772b6.jpg

 

1697495395_RH4.jpg.385608a7e4990ef3636974b6a290a352.jpg

 

753584013_RH3.jpg.6b1fecd013b710baafd52e2c64e5a311.jpg

 

1188994994_RH5.jpg.24ea5df07668d3678acff70eb564f232.jpg

 

 

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My 4 year old daughter asks "Why don't the people have any bodies?"I was going to ask why they look p*ssed off, maybe it's because of that!

Because they can't respect the weight limits for ULMs in France if they have bodies ;)

 

 

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