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Flying Lesson #10 - Entering & Departing the Circuit | Class G | Video


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This is my favorite flying lesson so far! For all the student pilots out there, I think you'll find this lesson really helpful as the instructor shares his recommendations and some good tips for entering and departing the circuit:

 

 

 

 

Do you guys depart the circuit on climb or wait until clear of the circuit before climbing out? How about joining the circuit - what's your preferred method?

 

 

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Do you guys depart the circuit on climb or wait until clear of the circuit before climbing out? How about joining the circuit - what's your preferred method?

 

Opening a can of worms with that question! Another great vid mate

 

 

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I was taught that you do not climb nor descend in the circuit, except when actually taking off and landing. When joining and on downwind you should maintain circuit height until the base turn. The only exception I can think of is departing straight out from the runway, when you maintain the runway heading and centreline until you are 1500' AGL.

 

 

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CAAP 166-1(3)

 

Departing the circuit area

 

6.4.1. Aircraft should depart the aerodrome circuit area by extending one of the standard

 

circuit legs or climbing to depart overhead. However, the aircraft should not execute a turn to fly against the circuit direction unless the aircraft is well outside the circuit area and no traffic conflict exists. This will normally be at least 3 NM from the departure end of the runway, but may be less for aircraft with high climb performance. In all cases, the distance should be based on the pilot’s awareness of traffic and the ability of the aircraft to climb above and clear of the circuit area...... Bob

 

 

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Logically the departing traffic should not conflict with arriving traffic. Some overflying will happen with arriving traffic but the "older" idea of departing from the ARP or aerodrome centre, "over the top" should be consigned to history, I would suggest. Your departure time can be derived abeam of after joining track allowing for the time/distance elapsed/ covered. Operating to a flight plan it's assumed you will be on track inside 5 miles, There is the 3 miles before turning in one of the circuit legs to think of and a very powerful plane may easily come into conflict with an overflying one, at 1500 ft AGL if the climb isn't adjusted. Nev

 

 

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Wow..Cool video.. Im sure if anybody posted videos of instruction, we would find people disagree with lots of detail.

 

there are a few things I would argue are not the norm..But I wont. All though I have to say.. Initial actions in an engine failure is certainly NOT Carby, fuel pump attitude.

 

Enjoy the training mate. Great fun the jabs :)

 

 

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This is my favorite flying lesson so far! For all the student pilots out there, I think you'll find this lesson really helpful as the instructor shares his recommendations and some good tips for entering and departing the circuit:

 

 

 

Hey RJW, I would highly recommend getting a copy of the Visual Flight Rules Guide (VFRG) It is a great summary of all the flight rules you need when flying in an easy to read and well set out format.
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Moorabbin's ERSA entry has the following, so I guess they want you to climb. Suggestion above re grabbing a copy of the VFRG is a good one.

 

DEPARTURES

 

4.4. VFR ACFT departing into Class G airspace must depart the CTR on an extended leg of the circuit.

 

4.5. Departure altitude - climb to 2,000FT AMSL or higher, cloud permitting.

 

 

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Wow..Cool video.. Im sure if anybody posted videos of instruction, we would find people disagree with lots of detail.there are a few things I would argue are not the norm..But I wont. All though I have to say.. Initial actions in an engine failure is certainly NOT Carby, fuel pump attitude.

Enjoy the training mate. Great fun the jabs :)

Glad you like the video. I find it interesting and helpful listening to other peoples point of views. Quite often Ill go back to my instructor and have a chat about some of the points of views raised in these discussion. Loving the training so far... cheers!

 

 

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Hey RJW, I would highly recommend getting a copy of the Visual Flight Rules Guide (VFRG) It is a great summary of all the flight rules you need when flying in an easy to read and well set out format.

Ive already got it! One thing is to read all the theory but I only really start to understand something once I start to put it into practice. For example, one interesting point raised in the above video was when I had to rejoin crosswind - it would have been easier to turn left to re-position (circuit direction was right) but ended up turning right to re-position because all turns must be made in the circuit direction.

 

 

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Nice one Rich, instructor told me today next nice day out he'll send me out to do some solo departure and re-joining practice, said I shouldn't get lost 002_wave.gif.62d5c7a07e46b2ae47f4cd2e61a0c301.gif003_cheezy_grin.gif.c5a94fc2937f61b556d8146a1bc97ef8.gif

 

 

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Nice one Rich, instructor told me today next nice day out he'll send me out to do some solo departure and re-joining practice, said I shouldn't get lost 002_wave.gif.62d5c7a07e46b2ae47f4cd2e61a0c301.gif003_cheezy_grin.gif.c5a94fc2937f61b556d8146a1bc97ef8.gif

I'd be worried if you did! Area solo is probably next on my list too... looking forward to just flying around and enjoying the experience.... solo!

 

 

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.... and a very powerful plane may easily come into conflict with an overflying one, at 1500 ft AGL if the climb isn't adjusted. Nev

Yeah I don't think the aircraft joining mid-field crosswind as I was taking off for departure quite expected me to pass underneath him on my upwind leg, level at circuit altitude a few months back! I had him sighted at all times but I could almost see him going "what the.......?"

 

 

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