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Others may disagree but IMO there is no such thing as a "beginners trike" Trikes vary by manufacturer, flight parameters, wings, engine, etc but none are marketed as a beginners aircraft. I did my training in an Airborne 912 with a Streak then Arrow wing and then went on to buy an Air Creation Tanarg.

 

It was within my budget and suited the type of flying I intended to persue - touring. So for what its worth you should make the decision as to which trike based on budget and intended use.

 

 

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Others may disagree but IMO there is no such thing as a "beginners trike" Trikes vary by manufacturer, flight parameters, wings, engine, etc but none are marketed as a beginners aircraft. I did my training in an Airborne 912 with a Streak then Arrow wing and then went on to buy an Air Creation Tanarg.It was within my budget and suited the type of flying I intended to persue - touring. So for what its worth you should make the decision as to which trike based on budget and intended use.

Thanks

 

 

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A trike is a 2 axis machine and as such is a bit simpler in some ways to learn to fly than a 3 axis aircraft. Don't be fooled though, handled wrongly, a 2 axis machine can kill just as quickly.

 

As Skeptic said, the wing's the thing. Generally, the strutted wings require a bit more care to fly than the kingpost wings, and in my experience, strutted wings are a bit heavier on the controls.

 

Definitely take your instructor's advice on which wing would be good for your experience and ability. I learned to fly on an XT912 with a cruze wing. The trim speed of the Cruze wing was about 48-50kts when set the trim was set to the fast setting.

 

 

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A trike is a 2 axis machine and as such is a bit simpler in some ways to learn to fly than a 3 axis aircraft. Don't be fooled though, handled wrongly, a 2 axis machine can kill just as quickly.As Skeptic said, the wing's the thing. Generally, the strutted wings require a bit more care to fly than the kingpost wings, and in my experience, strutted wings are a bit heavier on the controls.

Definitely take your instructor's advice on which wing would be good for your experience and ability. I learned to fly on an XT912 with a cruze wing. The trim speed of the Cruze wing was about 48-50kts when set the trim was set to the fast setting.

Thanks

 

 

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Bugsy:

 

You asked for advice on the Redback. IMO, If you can stretch the budget a bit, go for the four stroke trike (I think it is the Outback). Two stroke engines require more care and attention to maintenance than four stroke engines and for a beginner, it's one (big) less thing to have to come to terms with. If you already have good knowledge of two stroke engine maintenance, disregard the above.

 

Happy flying, blue skies and tailwinds to you.

 

 

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Bugsy:You asked for advice on the Redback. IMO, If you can stretch the budget a bit, go for the four stroke trike (I think it is the Outback). Two stroke engines require more care and attention to maintenance than four stroke engines and for a beginner, it's one (big) less thing to have to come to terms with. If you already have good knowledge of two stroke engine maintenance, disregard the above.

 

Happy flying, blue skies and tailwinds to you.

Great, thanks.

It was suggested that I do some lessons first to get the feel and some familiarisation which would help me decide on what's best for me. Good advise me thinks. Just thought that having my own would reduce the training costs considerably and get me familiar with my own trike. Maybe do some training and look at purchasing when I get a a bit of experience and complete my training might be the way to go.

 

 

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Not sure where you live, but I would be getting in touch with Peter at Yarrawonga Flight Training as he currently has Airborne, P&M Aviation and Air Creation trikes in his hangar. 2 stroke, 4 stroke and many different wings. I'm sure he would arrange a TIF and provide sound advice

 

 

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Not sure where you live, but I would be getting in touch with Peter at Yarrawonga Flight Training as he currently has Airborne, P&M Aviation and Air Creation trikes in his hangar. 2 stroke, 4 stroke and many different wings. I'm sure he would arrange a TIF and provide sound advice

Fraser Coast

 

 

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Fraser Coast

I'm guessing you're probably doing your training at Hervey Bay. Also worth calling Dave Cookman in Noosa (HGFA), and also speak to Crezzi (John Cresswell RA Aus) at Caboolture for second and third (not in any particular order) opinions. You can never have too much advice. Just follow what you think is right (generally where the majority agree). Dave was my instructor and I also did some flying with Crezzi. Both solid, honest guys.

 

 

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Make sure your intended instructor is willing to teach in your trike...........some maybe unwilling to do so and prefer their own.

 

Maybe get him to view it before purchase if possible.

 

Low hour 4 stroke rotax trikes are virtually selling for the price of the engine these days....very good value for long term ownership.

 

One near my hangar has been for sale for a couple of years. All the covers, head gear etc, owned by ex RAAF bloke......

 

He's getting older and wants to go 3 axis....

 

As they go for 80 grand plus new, I couldn't believe he wanted less than half that for it.......and still no takers....

 

 

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Hi Bugsy,

 

lots of good advice already, my experience is that I changed from 3 axis to trikes during training, completing about 2.5 hours before I decided to purchase my own trike through my instructor, Peter McLean who sourced it via Airborne. I have an Edge Classic powered by a Rotax 582 with a Streak wing, it was second hand with very low hours and affordable for me. I learnt in this trike, soloed and have had many great hours of flying and memories in it but in the the 5 - 6 years I have owned it the value has fallen dramatically, something Peter did warn me about at the time, simply because every one now wants a 4 stroke powered aircraft and it would seem that 2 stroke powered trikes are all but obsolete.

 

Earlier you said that "It was suggested that I do some lessons first to get the feel and some familiarisation which would help me decide on what's best for me. Good advise me thinks." Yes, from my experience, good advice indeed, your next comment: "Just thought that having my own would reduce the training costs considerably and get me familiar with my own trike," was how I thought and it's sort of right with regard being familiar with your own trike but from a cost perspective, yes training was cheaper having my own trike but now to change over to something more suited to touring as I would like to do, meaning something like an XT 912, Tarnarg or Quik R is cost prohibitive for me as there is just no value in the Edge any more and I am basically starting over once again or sticking with the trike I have.

 

"Maybe do some training and look at purchasing when I get a a bit of experience and complete my training might be the way to go." Great comment! in hindsight I would have done things differently, now that I have had the chance to fly in some different trikes under different wings, my experience has made me more aware that rushing in is not always the best idea.

 

Don't skimp on training, find the very best instructor in your area, one you can relate with and feel very comfortable being around, then learn everything they teach you, take it in and enjoy the experience, it a great time, I still look back on that phase of my training with great pleasure and knowing that Peter is still only a phone or radio call away is always good to have in the back of my mind. Pick their brain, ask questions and alway remember, there are no dumb questions, your life depends on knowing as much as possible about every aspect of every flight you make. Then, when it comes time to make your purchase, you will have the knowledge to make a purchase that suits you best, according to what you know you want in an aircraft. All the best for the future, Ross

 

 

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Hi Bugsy,lots of good advice already, my experience is that I changed from 3 axis to trikes during training, completing about 2.5 hours before I decided to purchase my own trike through my instructor, Peter McLean who sourced it via Airborne. I have an Edge Classic powered by a Rotax 582 with a Streak wing, it was second hand with very low hours and affordable for me. I learnt in this trike, soloed and have had many great hours of flying and memories in it but in the the 5 - 6 years I have owned it the value has fallen dramatically, something Peter did warn me about at the time, simply because every one now wants a 4 stroke powered aircraft and it would seem that 2 stroke powered trikes are all but obsolete.

Earlier you said that "It was suggested that I do some lessons first to get the feel and some familiarisation which would help me decide on what's best for me. Good advise me thinks." Yes, from my experience, good advice indeed, your next comment: "Just thought that having my own would reduce the training costs considerably and get me familiar with my own trike," was how I thought and it's sort of right with regard being familiar with your own trike but from a cost perspective, yes training was cheaper having my own trike but now to change over to something more suited to touring as I would like to do, meaning something like an XT 912, Tarnarg or Quik R is cost prohibitive for me as there is just no value in the Edge any more and I am basically starting over once again or sticking with the trike I have.

 

"Maybe do some training and look at purchasing when I get a a bit of experience and complete my training might be the way to go." Great comment! in hindsight I would have done things differently, now that I have had the chance to fly in some different trikes under different wings, my experience has made me more aware that rushing in is not always the best idea.

 

Don't skimp on training, find the very best instructor in your area, one you can relate with and feel very comfortable being around, then learn everything they teach you, take it in and enjoy the experience, it a great time, I still look back on that phase of my training with great pleasure and knowing that Peter is still only a phone or radio call away is always good to have in the back of my mind. Pick their brain, ask questions and alway remember, there are no dumb questions, your life depends on knowing as much as possible about every aspect of every flight you make. Then, when it comes time to make your purchase, you will have the knowledge to make a purchase that suits you best, according to what you know you want in an aircraft. All the best for the future, Ross

Good stuff Ross, Thanks!

 

 

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