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Marty d's CH-701 build log


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It worked!!!!!   I just popped the lower cowl out of the mould.  It came straight out, no sticking, no lumps and bumps and divots.  (Well maybe a couple of minor divots!)   Decided

*YAWN* I need sleep...   Tired but happy.    

I am building a Zodiac 650 and I opted for the 3M Carbon fibre wrap.  I also created a dash overlay that I broke up into several dash sections.  Still a few bits to go though.

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Nice job...you know of course that is the main strength in the design.its actually supplied completed like that from ICP for the Savannah kits because it is the core of the main structure

Thanks... no stress then!! Yeah Zenith supply them completed too, also the wing mainspars. Anything solid riveted I think.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

From the cheap inferior 701 copy thread (otherwise known as a Savannah) ..

 

Interesting, the CH701 doesn't have any SS rivets (to my knowledge!)

I seem to remember seeing different Marty a few weeks ago going through those plans I mentioned I got. I could be wrong but I swear there was a handful in a few strategic spots so be wary.

 

 

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You'd have to be nuts or know nothing about metallurgy to use ss rivets (or any ss fasteners) with aluminium.

 

If you need a stronger pull rivet you'd use monel (cupro-nickel) preferably with an electrical insulation medium like Duralac but that's not absolutely essential unless it's to be immersed in seawater.

 

It's standard procedure in yacht fittings for 50+ years ... but put ss and aly together and the aly will start corroding immediately.

 

 

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From the cheap inferior 701 copy thread (otherwise known as a Savannah) ..

 

I seem to remember seeing different Marty a few weeks ago going through those plans I mentioned I got. I could be wrong but I swear there was a handful in a few strategic spots so be wary.

I don't think there are. I've been poring over the plans for 7 years and I can't recall ever seeing any rivets other than Avdel Avex 1/8" and 5/32", and solid aluminium.

 

This article specifically mentions the corrosion problem with SS so it would seem unlikely that he'd include them.

 

Aircraft Construction, Riveted Joints (Part 2 of 2)

 

 

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No problem Marty, ears still ringing from an 18 hour trip sitting up the back of 2 x A330s, memory not to be trusted.

 

Go with the people who know when it comes to riveting, the US Military;

 

https://www.recreationalflying.com/tutorials/scratchbuilder/MIL-R-47196A.pdf

 

As per 3.5, my 20+ year old wing that I just stripped with the zinc chromate is like brand new, despite all of the rivets being stainless steel, I can certainly understand Heintz avoiding them from a retail perspective though, there's no way you could trust people to do the required prep.

 

 

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I've just visited Marty's 701 manufacturing facility. He's very good at those solid rivets, too. If you guys need any solid riveting done, I'm sure Marty would ace it for you in no time flat.

 

I'm very impressed with your project Marty. It's coming along very nicely.

 

 

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  • 2 months later...

Been a while but progress is slowly being made!

 

The front fuselage is now complete (ignoring little things like firewall, seats, cabin frame, instrument panel etc...)

 

Actually ran out of 1/8" rivets when nearly done, that's 5,500 of them used. Found a local supplier which was lucky.

 

459966235_FrontFuselage-complete-frontview.jpg.676c3f53d83758745f24dc28c991f994.jpg

 

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911641227_FrontFuselage-complete-undersideview2.jpg.a1dd180cb90bb46345b11018009c13af.jpg

 

 

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How many hrs have you logged on the build mate?Cheers

Absolutely no idea. I probably should have recorded them but have never bothered. Started when my eldest son was 2 and he's 9 now.

 

 

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Absolutely no idea. I probably should have recorded them but have never bothered. Started when my eldest son was 2 and he's 9 now.

That's 61,322 hours for the log so far, then.

 

It shows the big difference between scratch built and kit built!

 

 

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Marty, you'd only shock yourself if you kept an accurate log of the hours. All labours of love consume an inordinate amount of time, you simply just can't say you'll have a project finished in "X" amount of hours.

 

We have a local saying about mechanical repair/restoration/construct operations. "Double the number and go to the next highest unit".

 

That means, you look at a job and say to yourself, "Ahh, that's easy! That'll only take 10 mins!" It eventually takes 20 hours before you actually finish it.

 

You look at a more sizeable job and think, "We'll, I guess we can knock that off in a couple of weeks". The more sizeable job then ends up taking four months to complete.

 

You take on a project, stating, "I'll have this knocked over in six months!". The project ends up taking 12 years to finish. You get my drift? 003_cheezy_grin.gif.c5a94fc2937f61b556d8146a1bc97ef8.gif

 

 

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Next bit requires me to get the cabin frame welded up. I've got all the chrome moly for it, so have made a 3D view of the frame plus a wooden jig (90x35 framing pine) to hold everything in place.

 

If anyone else is scratch building, I can't upload the SKB file here, but PM me and I'll email it to you. Feel free to use it, but please double-check all dimensions first.

 

SketchUp is available for personal use as a free download.

 

1356161423_CabinFrame.jpg.567c351ff05b574932171a72cda75573.jpg

 

1333952543_CabinFrame2.jpg.5fef7b0d825767c9782fc4c4f76eb7ae.jpg

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

Hey marty those wing mount U sections you have made on the cabin frame. Are they made from Chrome Molly?...the Savannahs are made from stainless steel then welded to the chrome moly frame

 

 

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Hey marty those wing mount U sections you have made on the cabin frame. Are they made from Chrome Molly?...the Savannahs are made from stainless steel then welded to the chrome moly frame

Umm? As I understand it stainless must never be welded to CRMO because the joint will be very brittle. I'm no metallurgy expert but that's what research indicates ...
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Definitely not SS Mark... plans call for 0.080" 4130 plate for the U brackets and that's what they are. Yes they need to be welded too - hope there's enough top and bottom to weld to, they only protrude about 2mm.

 

 

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mine has a lot of rust internally

How do you get a lot of rust internally in your frame? Does it have a lot of openings which allow moisture and salt to enter?I would have thought a frame fully sealed against any moisture ingress would have been an important part of any airframe design, where metal that is prone to corrode is used.
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How do you get a lot of rust internally in your frame? Does it have a lot of openings which allow moisture and salt to enter?I would have thought a frame fully sealed against any moisture ingress would have been an important part of any airframe design, where metal that is prone to corrode is used.

That is a good question.

How can such corrosion be prevented?

 

 

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