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Nazi Autogyro towed by U-Boats


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sounds like the pilot was a brave man; among other things had a parachute, but it was only 400ft up, probably not enough.

"There was an emergency procedure, however, by which the pilot could jettison the blades and rotor hub. When the rotor assembly separated, it automatically opened a parachute attached to both the machine and the pilot. The pilot then released his safety belt and the aircraft dropped into the sea, leaving the pilot descending alone by parachute."

 

If it was automatic opening and he'd just jettisoned the rotor, it may have had enough time.

 

 

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"There was an emergency procedure, however, by which the pilot could jettison the blades and rotor hub. When the rotor assembly separated, it automatically opened a parachute attached to both the machine and the pilot. The pilot then released his safety belt and the aircraft dropped into the sea, leaving the pilot descending alone by parachute."If it was automatic opening and he'd just jettisoned the rotor, it may have had enough time.

Wot? It was a gyro, not a brick!

 

Drop the tow cable and it could descend into the ocean at a perfectly acceptable rate. Given that it was flying at about 20-25 knots in use it would have been a doddle to ditch at low speed.

 

 

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yes the autogiro would probably be a double edged sword ................ you could see further but others could see you from further afar as well ?

 

 

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From what I have read most of the time the U-Boat let go the cable when an enemy aircraft or vessel was sighted and dived ...... bugger the pilot!

Like I said. If the gyro dropped the cable, the pilot could expect to land fairly gently. Much easier than dealing with a parachute from 400 ft

 

 

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The article in the first post misses the great quote supposedly from a wartime report which states ' .....deploying a parachute as they departed which enabled him to descend into the sea still seated in the simple tubular fuselage. He then released his seat straps and drowned in the normal way'. That was quoted from the brilliant book, now sadly out of print I'd guess, 'The Secret War' by Brian Johnston (BBC).

 

Paul

 

 

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I think I got my copy years ago from Abebooks. If they're still around it may be worth a try. The book was to accompany the BBC series of the same name, which you can watch on 'YouTube'.

 

 

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