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Hi Guys,

 

Just a quick one, how many hours at average do people do in the air for their RPL and PPL. Also how many hours before first solo?

 

Just wanting to get an idea as I've been told virtually no one does it in the minimum required hours.

 

Cheers in advance

 

 

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About the only way to minimise the number of hours before first solo is to

 

  1. Organise to take a block of holiday leave in Autumn when the weather tends to be more stable.
     
     
  2. Before Autumn hit the theory books and complete all necessary pre-solo exams.
     
     
  3. Come Autumn, book three flights per day with your flight training organisation: 0900, 1200, 0300.
     
     
  4. Be sure to take wholesome food and drink so that you can replenish and rehydrate after the morning and midday flights.
     
     
  5. Take every opportunity between those flights to sit in the same type of aircraft and go over your previous lesson in thought and deed.
     
     
  6. Try to avoid aviation horror stories and ill-informed hangar talk. Trust your books, your instructor and your instruments.
     
     

 

 

If you follow this regime, you should be solo close to the minimum hours. Any variation will depend on your own degree of brain/hand/feet coordination.

 

It's not rocket science. Orville went solo on the first day he tried powered flight.

 

OME

 

 

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About the only way to minimise the number of hours before first solo is to

  1. Organise to take a block of holiday leave in Autumn when the weather tends to be more stable.
     
     
  2. Before Autumn hit the theory books and complete all necessary pre-solo exams.
     
     
  3. Come Autumn, book three flights per day with your flight training organisation: 0900, 1200, 0300.
     
     
  4. Be sure to take wholesome food and drink so that you can replenish and rehydrate after the morning and midday flights.
     
     
  5. Take every opportunity between those flights to sit in the same type of aircraft and go over your previous lesson in thought and deed.
     
     
  6. Try to avoid aviation horror stories and ill-informed hangar talk. Trust your books, your instructor and your instruments.
     
     

 

 

If you follow this regime, you should be solo close to the minimum hours. Any variation will depend on your own degree of brain/hand/feet coordination.

 

It's not rocket science. Orville went solo on the first day he tried powered flight.

 

OME

Haha I like your enthusiasm but unfortunately the most I'll be able to do is one hour a week, that's why I've been told it may be more likely to take around 40 hours to get my RPL.

 

 

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One lesson each fortnight saw me solo after 23 hours.

 

Then 5 solo hours, a couple of dual refreshers and the certificate (similar to RPL) in 30.7 hours.

 

I enjoyed taking a year to get the certificate.

 

 

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Haha I like your enthusiasm but unfortunately the most I'll be able to do is one hour a week, that's why I've been told it may be more likely to take around 40 hours to get my RPL.

You asked for the range of hours before first solo. If you want to reach that milestone, then you will have to work at it. If you say you can do one hour a week, supposedly on weekends, why can't you swing it for 2 hours? (Money matters aside). If you cannot swing it for Item 3 above, make sure that you complete Item 2 before your first lesson, and do as much of Item 5 as you can - it's free.

 

Flying is just like driving a car. It's practice, practice, practice.

 

OME

 

 

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One lesson each fortnight saw me solo after 23 hours.Then 5 solo hours, a couple of dual refreshers and the certificate (similar to RPL) in 30.7 hours.

 

I enjoyed taking a year to get the certificate.

Yeah nice, you must have been a natural getting it in that many hours!

 

 

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I am not a natural.

 

Just enjoy the training for its intrinsic fun!

 

It's like anything, difficult at the start but then it clicks.

 

My father went solo in similar time (only a little longer but don't have his log book near me) and he's 70!

 

 

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Don't be to concerned with how long it will take you to solo. Enjoy the experience.

 

I also was only able to swing about a lesson a week, and it took me 30hours to get to solo. Part of that was cancellations due to weather, other commitments on a weekend, both of which help you lose your flow.

 

But looking back one of my problems was performance anxiety. I thought that I had to be at a certain stage by a certain amount of hours and when I didn't reach those milestones at a certain number of hours I would doubt my ability (crosswind was my achellies heel) and that would make for a average lesson the next week.

 

The biggest thing was to have supportive instructors. After a frustrating lesson I actually got a phone call from the CFI who gave me a big of a pep talk telling me to hang in there, and sure enough about 3-5hours later I was solo.

 

 

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Just went through the logbook this is for my RPC: Solo 6.3hrs, solo training area 15hrs and flight test at 20.7 hrs. Everyone is different dont worry just enjoy it and it will be easy.

 

 

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  • 2 months later...
I also was only able to swing about once a week, and it took me hours to get to solo. Part of that was cancellations due to weather, other commitments on a weekend, both of which help you lose your flow.

But looking back one of my problems was performance anxiety..

Oh dear! Performance anxiety. No matter how many times she says, "It's OK, love. I understand.", it's always in the back of your mind the next time.

 

 

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Oh dear! Performance anxiety. No matter how many times she says, "It's OK, love. I understand.", it's always in the back of your mind the next time.

Bit left field there...

 

 

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It's not rocket science. Orville went solo on the first day he tried powered flight.OME

He had spent a couple of decades before throwing hang gliders off cliffs, and then later that day Wilbur tried the same thing and crashed it.....

 

As for going solo, there are so many variables that decide how long that takes. Having sent people solo, I can tell you that your instructor will know before you. Ultimately the solo standard is all about being consistently safe, your circuits don't have to be perfect.

 

 

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First gold nugget of information I got from the hangar person at my school...don't bother comparing yourself to anyone else. You will be good at some parts of the training and not so good at other parts so just enjoy yourself.

 

 

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Have to agree with most posters- highly variable as to when people are ready to solo. Also highly variable as to when schools send people solo.

 

I've heard some horror stories of schools who send people solo before they can do any of the emergency procedures adequately. Just a single go or demonstration at the procedures and off the student goes. If a problem happens the student is flying hopeless. All in the name of being able to tell prospective students they can teach in minimum time to save money.

 

 

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