Jump to content

Best Way to get a Commercial License


Recommended Posts

HI I have an 18 year old nephew who may be interested in getting his commercial license. Just wandering what is the best, cheapest (in that order of priority) way to go about this. He is about 2 hours from Adelaide and has TIF booked at Parafield to take soon. We also have access to an RAAus flight school within 20 km Would he be better off to get some hours up locally? Will the RAAus hours be recognised later on? Should he just bight the bullet and do the travelling? I remember seeing related threads but could not find them after a quick look. Thanks in advance.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Two ways to commercial. One is the integrated course which is a min of 150 hours, basically full time in GA aircraft only and can be done at YPPF in a couple of the schools.

 

The other requires 200 hrs with 100 hrs in command. Half the 200 hrs can be RAAus. Self study will save money. Probably the cheaper option in the long run. Suggest RAAus certificate first to see if he has the aptitude, drive and interest to commit more money.

 

Cheers

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Just wandering what is the best, cheapest (in that order of priority) way to go about this.

The military, excellent training, the latest & best training aircraft, training is very cheap i.e. FREE & in actual fact they pay you.

 

On the downside being in the military is not for everybody, training is tax payer funded therefore failure rates very high, you must progress at the rate that is expected otherwise you get scrubbed, also its a 12 year commitment once you graduate, he'll be early 30's & looking very good for the airlines if thats what he wants.080_plane.gif.36548049f8f1bc4c332462aa4f981ffb.gif

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 2
  • Caution 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

What HF said is spot on.

 

My suggestion would be to do some RA time as well, just enough to get the hang of it as the hours may not be of short term benefit depending on training choice and jobs applying for. All experience is of benefit in the long run.

 

The integrated courses can be good depending of the flight school, and ground school classes may suit some better but exactly the opposite is true of the non integrated courses so it's really about choosing a good school to fit the applicant. I did an integrated course and learnt a lot that of 'non technical skills ' that have helped me through the industry, basically just professionalism stuff.

 

Benny is correct regarding the military, with appropriate grades, commitment, and youth it will ensure he will become a good pilot if he stuck it through.

 

Only bit of advice is whatever route is taken outside of the RAAF, remember it's 'your' money being spent..

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dont forget perserverance, enthusiasm and dedication - (disregarding the expense) its a long road - but strangely rewarding ......... all at the same time

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
The military, excellent training, the latest & best training aircraft, training is very cheap i.e. FREE & in actual fact they pay you.On the downside being in the military is not for everybody, training is tax payer funded therefore failure rates very high, you must progress at the rate that is expected otherwise you get scrubbed, also its a 12 year commitment once you graduate, he'll be early 30's & looking very good for the airlines if thats what he wants.080_plane.gif.36548049f8f1bc4c332462aa4f981ffb.gif

Lad I know did exactly that. He's just about due to come out, having flown the B737 on VIP and other tasks. Should walk straight into a decent job. Beats the hell out of flying clapped out Navajos on parcel runs and that sort of thing.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

In regards to the military option, there is one thing to remember. If you make it in, you'll be a military officer first and a pilot second. Meaning the needs of the ADF come before flying. So if he's keen to serve as well as fly, then that's good. But if not, that is if it's just about wanting to fly, then focus on the civilian side of things.

 

As said before start with some RA Aus flying then head down a 200hr CPL (more flexible and cheaper in the long run)

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
In regards to the military option .... you'll be a military officer first and a pilot second..... head down a 200hr CPL (more flexible and cheaper in the long run)

Yep, some years back talking to a friend he said that his job was to weed out the Hornet pilots from the fighter pilots.

Also consider that more than just a CPL is required to get a job.

 

Having lived in the USA with contacts in aviation there I'd consider training in the USA - cost of a nominal 250 hr course providing twin IFR too plus travel and accommodation is an interesting comparison. Wouldn't contemplate it without getting advice from someone I trusted who was familiar with the school (that comment applies generally).

 

 

  • More 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

As he's 18, and by the sound done a TIF, I would highly recommend taking a year or so of lessons if it's financially an option?

 

Reality is a being 18, time is very much on his side, but knowing himself may not be. Whether Joining the military or spending $100k on getting a commercial licence, it's a really huge commitment either way. Now is also an interesting time for integrated courses. The gov just changed the VET-FEE system to VET student loans and most schools I know that used the old system honestly don't know what their status will be when the 6 month period expires; they're still waiting to see. If he's not self-funding, that's a huge wait and see!

 

If it were my son, and knowing just how much we all changed between the ages of 18 and say... 24 or whatever, I would fully encourage and support his dream, but encourage him to take it slow - at the end of the day every hour he flies now is experience in the bank when/if he takes an integrated course, and an extra hour of total time when he's applying for his first job.. also encourage the ground school side of things. :)

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Has he looked into cadetships?

 

I am in the process of sorting out all the same questions, self fund my license? or Cadetship?

 

I've decided RAAus is the best way to go to gain some hours and see if I have the aptitude for it all....(the commitment and enthusiasm is most definetly there!!).

 

I'm steering towards a commercial career, not looking at a military career, but that's up to your nephew!

 

So in my opinion RAAus is great place to start, it's cost effective and the hours all count!

 

And as for money, RAAus offer scholarships to help get your certificate so he could apply for one to gain some hours but not spend his money.

 

Jayke

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...