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old man emu

Rare Aviation Books

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old man emu

I happened upon this little shop while I was having a walk around the Barangaroo Park at Darling Harbour, Sydney. It sells aviation related books. The ones I looked at were mostly from World War One and were letters and reminiscences of pilots. There were a number of other categories, but I was short on time and could not explore everything. Not being in a position to buy anything, I didn't ask about prices, but he did tell me that he sold an original manual for a Clerget engine for $150, which I think is a reasonable price for an rare antique book.

 

The owner, Marshall SILVER told me he that his wares range from the WW1 period to about 1939. They seem to be mainly from the USA (I think he is an American).

 

If you are looking for a rare book you can contact him on 0448 488 407 or by email at marshall@rareaviationbooks.com. If you are in The Rocks, the shop is at 8 Argyle Place, Millers Point. I'd call before going there on the weekend, just to see if they are open.

 

OME

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Neil_S
I happened upon this little shop while I was having a walk around the Barangaroo Park at Darling Harbour, Sydney. It sells aviation related books. The ones I looked at were mostly from World War One and were letters and reminiscences of pilots. There were a number of other categories, but I was short on time and could not explore everything. Not being in a position to buy anything, I didn't ask about prices, but he did tell me that he sold an original manual for a Clerget engine for $150, which I think is a reasonable price for an rare antique book.

 

The owner, Marshall SILVER told me he that his wares range from the WW1 period to about 1939. They seem to be mainly from the USA (I think he is an American).

 

If you are looking for a rare book you can contact him on 0448 488 407 or by email at marshall@rareaviationbooks.com. If you are in The Rocks, the shop is at 8 Argyle Place, Millers Point. I'd call before going there on the weekend, just to see if they are open.

 

OME

 

Hi OME,

 

Sounds like my kind of shop! Sadly I am not really able to drop in as I live in Melbourne, but it is added to my list if I am up that way (will have to make some excuse to my wife for going there....)

 

Cheers,

Neil

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Maj Millard

Yes thanks for that info OME........sounds like my kind of shop also......I have an extensive collection of rare books of the same period...also collected whilst living in the U.S. I'm sure I have some your friend would like.

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bexrbetter

Years ago I gave my father a nice set of WW2 servicing handbooks; hydraulics, landing gear, fuse etc. for a variety of craft, interesting stuff.

 

Next time I mention I'm going back to Oz, someone remind me and I'll scan them and share.

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Maj Millard
Years ago I gave my father a nice set of WW2 servicing handbooks; hydraulics, landing gear, fuse etc. for a variety of craft, interesting stuff.

 

Next time I mention I'm going back to Oz, someone remind me and I'll scan them and share.

Old aviation books are great....I have one written in 1909.....it's mostly rubbish ..they were just guessing.

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bexrbetter

So Maj, Friday night and a few ports?

 

I have no idea what you are on about.

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Maj Millard

Happy to give you some examples.....

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bexrbetter
Happy to give you some examples.....

 

I have no idea what does your post has to do with mine?

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old man emu

I was about to add something to this thread when I read the last few posts... and had to pause a moment in remembrance.

 

That having been done, I was contacted by the owner of the bookshop and he said that he might place an advertisement on this site. So send him an email, or drop into the shop if you are in The Rocks, Sydney.

The ad will help Ian keep running the site, and will keep a small business running in Sydney.

 

OME

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facthunter

I have been very fortunate in having a friend who has lent me a large amount of aviation and mechanically related information. The older Gnome and Rhone rotary engines (where the engine rotates around a stationary crankshaft) would on average only do about four hours before requiring attention to the small spring loaded valves sited in the pistons, and they only did about 1200RPM, but had lots of torque. Nev

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onetrack

OME - I haven't read it, but there's a review in the link below - and a very lengthy interview with Ron, from 2003, on the Australians at War, Film archive site ...

 

Aircrew Book Review: A Gremlin On My Shoulder - Ron Cundy DFC, DFM, MID

 

William Cundy | Australians at War Film Archive

 

I can't find any record of his death, obituary, or funeral - so I have to presume he's still alive. That would make him 96 next month, and one of the very few surviving WW2 pilots.

 

His full name is William Ronald Cundy, but his preferred name is Ron. His Service Number is 402732. His Dad was a Gallipoli veteran and a Captain.

 

I had to chuckle at his retelling of the episode where a bloke he knew altered his RAAF career recommendation from "O" for Observer, to "P" for Pilot, just with a stroke of a pen!

Talk about how one stroke of a pen could alter your life completely.

 

This came about because Ron was really keen to become a pilot, but the RAAF initial interviewer didn't consider he was good enough, so he marked him down merely for Observer.

Must have been a tough job in those trying times, trying to sort out those who would make top pilots and those who wouldn't.

The character requirements were just as important as the natural piloting skills.

In my many years of training people to operate machines, it's surprising how some people seem to lack initial aptitude, and are slow to learn, but they eventually become first class operators.

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