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Light plane crashes in SA's South East


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IMG_0231.JPG.993ba9953ed4b15b5d41af47dfb36886.JPG Very sad...

 

This article shows a wierd takeoff, may have been trying to get back to runway. Also shows wreckage

 

soz, the links playing up...

 

Go to google news and the Australian article

 

 

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TV saying it was an angel flight, if so it may get CASA going again as they tried to curtail Angelflight a few years ago when a fatal angel flight occurred in Victoria.

I was just reading the ATSB report on FaceBook of the Jan 2016 Piper PA-28 VH-PXD where four were unfortunately lost in a poor visibility crash of the south coast Vic just west of Port Phillip Heads and it went on to mention a couple of others including the one I think you're talking about. I was out with CFI just recently in some poor conditions and I can see how things can go pear shaped very quickly. He made comment that he was pleased with the way I handled things and the choices I made in those conditions. I hope I never stop making good decisions.

A sad day, condolences to family and friends.

 

 

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Very sad to hear. A pilot volunteering to help a family - doing something for another

 

Thoughts are with all there.

 

Having owned a restaurant in Mt Gambier for nearly 20 years I have seen some unusual weather there.

 

 

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Yes. Looks like a high speed impact near vertical. Not survivable. Angel flight. Yes. Who knows what CASA will do about that. Very sad. It would be over quickly. Nev

 

 

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I'm very saddened to hear of, and see the results of this crash. I'm also amazed at the massive destruction of the aircraft as a result of what appears to be an almost vertical dive into the ground.

 

One has to wonder if the weather really did have a major bearing on this crash - although the last minute or two of the indicated flight path certainly doesn't look like someone who knew exactly where they were, and where they were going.

 

 

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Only guessing but may have had a carb icing issue/engine problem due to the moisture around the airport at the time trying to get back to airport going by the flight track

 

ATSB with cover all avenues

 

 

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Spatial disorientation kills!! How many times do we have to see aircraft wreckage like this to learn that those that don't have the correct ratings or aircraft stay out of fog and low cloud regardless of circumstances... my thoughts are with those that have to live with the consequences of these loved souls lost.

 

 

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IF the engine's running and the nose is pointing straight down you go fast, fast. We don't know the cause but the result is there to see..

 

When rated pilots give warning of dire consequences if you get disorientated, we get accused of embellishing the skill (making it up) and that Instrument flying must be easy as EVERYONE knows which way is DOWN.. I stress again I'm not wanting to make assumptions as to the cause here. But there's a regular loss of planes in the "No visibility" GA environment. Nev

 

 

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The news media have reported delays to commercial traffic at the time, and on another forum someone reported a Rex doing a missed approach.

 

Someone claimed that the Met report at the time was visibility 3400 metres and overcast at 200 feet. If correct, that would make it an IFR flight requirement.

 

 

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A Tobago is the type of plane that would be IFR equipped, and You don't buy one of those as a first plane. I'm guessing that the pilot was IFR rated. Isn't that a requirement for pilots who volunteer to carry out this sort of flight for the charity involved?

 

OME

 

 

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A Tobago is the type of plane that would be IFR equipped, and You don't buy one of those as a first plane. I'm guessing that the pilot was IFR rated. Isn't that a requirement for pilots who volunteer to carry out this sort of flight for the charity involved?OME

He and the aircraft could be IFR rated.

Not sure about the requirement, the one which went down at Horsham was flying VFR from memory.

 

 

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From my research I believe that the cause of the collision was medical related, Pilot was 78yr, yes conditions were foggy, Even delaying RPT traffic.

 

Im sure the TB-10 is IFR rated, Pressure of situation and conditions may have led to a medical episode . Hope to hear answers on this investigation.

 

Please note that this is my opinion only as I am not a licensed air crash investigator.

 

 

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